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Flo

NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 30, 1998
SHE WAS a vision of speed and power, glamour and beauty. Of which, the last two were the most surprising. One does not expect to come across dazzle and loveliness in the world of track and field. It's a fish-out-of-water surprise, not unlike a red rose found blooming among wildflowers at the side of the road.Me, I was never a big fan of the sport. But I'd always pause -- you simply had to pause -- when Florence Griffith Joyner was running. Not just because she won races and set records, but because she did so with long, painted nails, sexy track suits, and a silky mane flowing behind her, all serving to accentuate a compelling native beauty.
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SPORTS
By JOHN POWERS and JOHN POWERS,BOSTON GLOBE | September 22, 1998
It wasn't so much the gold medals, which she won in triplicate. It wasn't so much the times, which some people found literally unbelievable. It was the style -- racy and edgy and undeniably glam.Florence Griffith Joyner, who died of an apparent heart seizure yesterday at 38, was a race car done up in Day-Glo, a sprinter who stopped the show merely by spreading her polished six-inch nails on the starting line.FloJo was fluorescent. She turned up for the world championships in a clingy bodysuit that might have been borrowed from the Cat Woman's closet.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | January 8, 1992
WASHINGTON -- They are linked forever by their gold medals and the Joyner name. The difference is, Florence Griffith Joyner represents track and field past, while Jackie Joyner-Kersee continues to define track and field present.Flo Jo, 31, was one of a kind -- those one-legged outfits, those nails! -- but she retired after winning three gold medals in the 1988 Olympics. JJK, 29, intends to compete in Barcelona this summer and Atlanta in 1996, winning the heptathlon and long jump over and over again.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | May 9, 1991
DOMINICK DUNNE is the thinking person's Jackie Collins. H invites you along on a scandal-tinged, sex-laced romp with the lowlifes that make up our upper classes but proves to be such an insightful and witty tour guide that you don't feel at all guilty about making the trip.He skewered New York in "People Like Us." Now it's Los Angeles in "An Inconvenient Woman," a four-hour ABC production that runs Sunday and Monday nights at 9 o'clock on Channel 13 (WJZ).Your narrator is none other than a successful author who is in Hollywood to help turn his book into a movie.
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