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By MIKE PRESTON | March 23, 2009
During Ray Lewis' news conference last week, he said he was only flirting with other teams. Flirting? If another team had offered Lewis more money than the Ravens, he would have been gone in a heartbeat. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/ ravensinsider)
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
Prior to a date with Maryland in a semifinal of the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament on April 25, Notre Dame was on the cusp of being eliminated from postseason consideration. A loss would have given the Fighting Irish a 6-6 record with only a regular-season finale against Army remaining on the schedule, and qualifying for the NCAA tournament requires at least a .500 record. But Notre Dame removed all uncertainty by edging Maryland and Syracuse for the ACC championship and earning the league's automatic qualifier for the NCAA postseason.
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FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | May 1, 1993
After more than 800 students were surveyed in experiments on flirting at California State University in Fresno, researchers came up with these interesting tidbits:* Men use eye contact and touch more than women when flirting. They are far more suggestive, give more gifts and are more likely to initiate an interaction.* When asked to rate effective flirting techniques, men think it's a great idea to send flowers to a woman. Yet women don't rate that as high as men do.* Other research, Dr. Michael Botwin says, has indicated that those dreaded pick-up lines such as "Hey, baby" or "What's your momma feed you to make you look so fine?"
NEWS
April 4, 2013
The Baltimore Orioles are back in town for their home opener on Friday, and this is the moment when newspaper editorialists generally wax poetic about baseball in spring, fathers and sons, the uncertain state of the national pastime and hope springing eternal. There's usually a bit about how baseball is like life, how you have brief moments of action but mostly it's about planning and anticipation and how even the greatest ballplayers and teams do not succeed much of the time. Oh, we could go on. References to baseball movies like "Field of Dreams" or "The Natural" are big, too. And there's usually a few jokes about how baseball relates to the politics of the day or maybe a famous quote or two. Like how Harry Truman once presciently warned the owner of the Washington Senators to look out for Richard Nixon's curve.
FEATURES
By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
Nothing says "I'm a desperate loser" quite so clearly as voluntarily going on a "Flirting Safari," other than actually saying, a desperate loser."The nearly 50 people who gathered to go on the amorous adventure at a local bookstore on a recent night seemed to realize this. Nobody wanted to sit in the front rows.For the next hour, a "relationship coach" would take the anxious yet hopeful crowd on this safari, an audience-participation seminar that promised to transform us into Kings of the Jungle of Love.
FEATURES
By Donald Munro and Donald Munro,McClatchy News Service | May 1, 1993
Fresno, Calif. -- The pinstriped shirt stands and leans forward with studied nonchalance, his belly reaching the tall bar table just before his belt. He smiles. The plaid blazer grins back, a wide, toothy smile accompanied by a throaty little laugh, and she scoots her chair an almost imperceptible distance toward him.There are others at the table in the bar this Thursday evening, but for a moment, these are the only two pairs of eyes that count. The blazer tells a joke. It's an aside, really, a trifle requiring nothing more than a chuckle in response, yet the shirt guffaws, spilling out laughter like a kid blowing bubbles.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 23, 1991
Washington -- I knew everything had changed when a male colleague walked in the office last week and greeted me with a cool, professional "Hello, Susan."My head turned in astonishment. This was a breakthrough.For four years, this man had swept into the office with a breezy, "Hi, beautiful!" There was never any chance of mistaking this for a compliment; it was the same line he used on every female with whom he had more than a passing acquaintance.But now, it seemed, the sassy salutations were to be no more.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | March 29, 1996
"Flirting With Disaster" does in fact flirt with disaster, in its very choice of forms. It's farce, one of those mad whirligigs that takes a single slightly illogical premise and punches it out toward infinity, based on the mad optimism that its creators can continue to crank and twist the plot in ever more absurd ways until it resembles a map of DNA as drawn by a chimp. But it can't just be fast and frantic. It's also got to be funny.Well, it's funny as hell and that's all there is to it.Written and directed by the frighteningly talented David O. Russell, who unleashed "Spanking the Monkey" on an unsuspecting world, this one watches as a moony, self-obsessed young man takes his wife on a cross-country odyssey in search of his real parents (he was given up for adoption)
FEATURES
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | August 12, 2006
Next time someone gives you a signal in traffic, it may not be to indicate a right turn. Or to invite you to race. Or even to express road rage. It could be the start of something romantic. The highway has become the next stop on the Internet dating scene. A free Web site, Flirtingintraffic.com, debuted six months ago as a way to link drivers who catch each other's eye. "The hook is that someone can meet you instead of never seeing you again after the light changes," said Jennifer Litz, 24, of San Antonio, Texas.
FEATURES
April 5, 1991
Now that we know who killed Laura Palmer, the biggest mystery on TV is: What's going to happen to the flirting neighbors who share a lust for Taster's Choice coffee and, perhaps, each other?Here's the story thus far: In the first commercial, the woman is having a dinner party and goes to the man's place to borrow some coffee. In the second,one, the woman drops off a jar of the stuff to the man, who is having dinner with another woman!There's more going on here than coffee: There's a definite chemistry between the elegant, brunet woman and her rather roguish neighbor.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2012
Jason Hammel didn't arrive at Turner Field on Saturday night with many fond memories. He'd seen enough of the Braves in his three seasons in the National League. “These guys have given me nightmares, especially here,” he said. But it was here where the Orioles' 29-year-old right-hander would give his team its best pitching performance of the season. Hammel threw the best game of his seven-year career, taking a no-hitter into the seventh inning and finishing with his first complete-game shutout win. He allowed just one hit on the night - Jason Heyward's single to left with two outs in the seventh - propelling the Orioles to a 5-0 win over the Braves at Turner Field.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2012
Jason Hammel didn't begin the scoreboard watching until the end of the sixth inning Sunday afternoon. The right-hander took his seat in the Orioles dugout and thought to himself how quickly his first start of the season was going. He had thrown just 65 pitches through those six innings. He was making quick work of the Minnesota Twins with a bevy of ground-ball outs. His teammates started inching away from him on the bench. "After a while you kind of realize, 'Man, we're moving along here pretty quick.
NEWS
April 5, 2012
Now your opinion writers are masking their invective. I thought it was a new and fair Dan Rodricks in the first two paragraphs of his recent column ("Razing the JFX, lowering O's expectations," April 3) that reflected the headline. But the remainder of the column was the usual rationalization of President Barack Obama's poor health care law. Healthcare should be improved - coverage for uninsured and an extra year for kids is fine. But we don't need 2,000-plus pages to do that.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
Nearly 3,000 miles from the red-bricked neighborhoods on the banks of the Patapsco, a Baltimore native is on a sugary mission to introduce Californians to the joy that is a little cup of flavored ice on a hot summer day. She's a one-woman Baltimore snowball outreach campaign. "I felt that the West Coast was missing out," says Katie Baum, a Maryland transplant in the Bay Area who a few months ago launched Skylite Snowballs, a mobile dispensary where she sells an upscale version of the treats with a free topping of Baltimore nostalgia.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
The Howard County Council did not cut a cent from County Executive Ken Ulman's budget proposal, although members delayed voting for more than three hours Wednesday in an unsuccessful attempt to secure unanimous approval. Ulman said in a prepared statement that he kept his request conservative because he is not sure the county's fiscal picture has stabilized. He had asked for $1.56 billion in operating cash and $179.3 million for capital improvements. "The national economy has yet to provide clear evidence that recovery is under way," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2011
Rye Rye has been on the cusp of rap stardom for some time. About three years ago, the trendy, provocative rapper M.I.A. discovered the Baltimore rapper, whose real name is Ryeisha Berrain, and hooked her up with a major record deal. Last week, Rolling Stone magazine named her an artist to watch. While her long-delayed debut album, "Go! Pop! Bang!" won't be in stores until May, she has just released a a free, 18-track, downloadable mix tape, "Ryeot Powrr, to drum up support for it. The 20-year-old East Baltimore native draws from both pop music and Baltimore Club, and still loves dancing at the Paradox.
FEATURES
April 8, 1991
Now that we know who killed Laura Palmer, the biggest mystery on TV is: What's going to happen to the flirting neighbors who share a lust for Taster's Choice coffee and, perhaps, each other?Here's the story thus far: In the first commercial, the woman is having a dinner party and goes to the man's place to borrow some coffee. In the second one, the woman returns the favor by dropping off a jar of the stuff to the man, who is having dinner with another woman!There's more going on here than coffee: There's a definite chemistry between the elegant, brunet woman and her rather roguish neighbor.
FEATURES
By THE ECONOMIST | September 2, 2000
CHICAGO - Ask any unmarried, overworked middle-class person looking for love, and he or she will tell you it seems hopeless. Finding Mr. or Miss Right is harder than ever. In the 1950s, the median age of marriage for women in the United States was 20, and it was not much more for men. Most well-educated women met their husbands at university, where there was an ample supply of suitable partners. Men could do the same, or find a wife in the suburbs where they grew up, or marry a girl in the office.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | March 23, 2009
During Ray Lewis' news conference last week, he said he was only flirting with other teams. Flirting? If another team had offered Lewis more money than the Ravens, he would have been gone in a heartbeat. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/ ravensinsider)
NEWS
By Ken Kaye and Josh Frank and Ken Kaye and Josh Frank,SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL | August 28, 2006
Temporarily strengthening into the season's first hurricane yesterday, Ernesto moved toward Florida, putting the Keys under the gun and threatening to bring torrential rain, wind and tornadoes to South Florida tomorrow and Wednesday. Visitors were ordered to leave the Keys yesterday, and Gov. Jeb Bush declared a state of emergency. "It certainly looks like it's going to impact a significant portion of Florida before it's all over," said Max Mayfield, director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami.
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