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NEWS
July 30, 2012
When former Gov.Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.proposed bringing slots to Maryland during his term in office, his most vocal critic wasMartin O'Malley, who called it the Devil's work because it would be a tax on the poor that encouraged them to try to win their way out of poverty. Mr. O'Malley and his allies made sure the issue never came to a vote. But after being elected governor, Mr. O'Malley changed his tune. Gambling is now everywhere: the lottery, Keno and multi-state games have saturated the poorest areas of the state.
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NEWS
By Samantha Iacia, For The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2013
Date: Oct. 26, 2013 Her story: Grace Katherine "Katie" Beach, 28, grew up in Catonsville. She is an accountant at the Social Security Administration office in Woodlawn. Her parents, Mary Lou and Tom Beach, live in Catonsville. His story: Joseph "Joe" Benson, 29, grew up in Carney. He is an economist at the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services, also in Woodlawn. His mother, Charlotte Benson, lives in Parkville, and his father, Rodney Benson, lives in Washington, D.C. Their story: Katie and Joe met in October of 2008 when mutual college friends introduced them at the Claddagh Pub in Canton.
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NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2009
If the term "festivus" was used instead of "Super Bowl" by the Baltimore Ravens in the 2000-2001 season, what did the word mean when a group of players from that season threw a party called Flip-Flop Festivus? By the looks of things at HarborView's Tabrizi's restaurant, it meant a great summer shindig. More than 200 people in Hawaiian shirts, sundresses - and yes, plenty of flip-flops - browsed a silent auction, chowed down on a variety of hors d'oeuvres, and sampled choices at a rum tasting station.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | November 20, 2012
The Ravens caught a big break when the NFL overturned Ed Reed's one-game suspension on appeal Tuesday and instead imposed a $50,000 fine for his third violation of the league's player safety rules over the past three seasons. Reed will be able to practice this week and play in Sunday's game in San Diego, and the Ravens will not be missing a third key starter in the defensive secondary against the pass-happy San Diego Chargers. So, all's well that ends well, right? Not necessarily.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | July 29, 2008
IN THE city, it is only acceptable for a man to wear flip-flops if he has just come from a pedicure and he's still damp. But seriously, folks, flip-flops are for the beach or maybe for washing the car or spaniel. They are not the next big thing. They are the last sad thing on the road to stylistic surrender," writes GQ's Glenn O'Brien. Royal undies Now we don't want to be telling the Victoria's Secret folks how to run their amazing business, but it wouldn't hurt if they took some thin, snazzy, young models and put them into Queen Victoria's bloomers.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2004
One day last July, Mary Stanton was waiting for a Mass to begin at Baltimore's Cathedral of Mary Our Queen when a little boy ran up and hugged her. His name was John Gaver, then 8 years old, the youngest of five Ukrainian orphans adopted by Barbara Gaver, a Mount Washington child and family counselor. Stanton, a religion teacher, became fast friends with the Gaver family. So when it came time for Stanton's sophomore classes at Mount de Sales Academy, a girls school in Catonsville, to do a Lenten service project, she suggested raising money for the orphanage where John and his sister, Lana, had lived in squalid conditions.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | July 23, 2005
IF OPPRESSIVELY HOT and muggy weather wasn't clue enough, there was a sure sign of summer this week in the news out of Washington. Call it the Sandal Scandal - a flap that arose after a White House photograph of Northwestern University's national championship women's lacrosse team revealed four of the athletes posed next to President Bush were wearing flip-flops. Relatives of the students were aghast when they saw the pictures posted on the Internet. They feared the footwear might be interpreted as a sign of disrespect to perhaps the most formal venue in the nation.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Wellington and Elizabeth Wellington,McClatchy-Tribune | July 20, 2008
We all know how burning, muggy summers can tempt us into making questionable style choices for the office: bare legs, cleavage-baring tops, flip-flops, and probably the biggest offense of all - wearing shorts in the cubicle. So this week, as the temperatures climb to the 90s, humidity in tow, we should pay special attention to our workplace attire. It can be the difference between spending the rest of the day in company-paid air-conditioning or trudging back home in the heat to try your luck again.
NEWS
July 6, 2009
Calcium supplements have no effect on weight, study says People who eat more dairy products have lower weights and seem to lose weight more easily, several observational studies published in recent years have suggested. But new research - perhaps the best study to date on the issue - found that calcium supplements have no effect on weight. The study involved 340 obese or overweight adults, most of whom were women. They were assigned to take either 1,500 milligrams of calcium or a placebo with meals for two years.
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,Sun Reporter | August 26, 2007
A LOT HAS BEEN SAID ABOUT HOW "THE YOUNG FOLK" COME IN TO THE OFFICE THESE DAYS. They've got on flip-flops (Tsk!) and their legs are bare (Gasp!). Their bellies or tattoos show. What is to come of the world? Some etiquette advisers would rather the newest entrants into the corporate world dress the way they do: in jackets and blouses, pearls and pantyhose. But we think there's a new way to dress in the workplace -- flip-flops notwithstanding. It combines the casualness of youth with the propriety of the office, and it looks great.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | September 27, 2012
After the team's season-opening win against the Cincinnati Bengals, the Ravens made a change in their depth chart, leapfrogging Dennis Pitta over Ed Dickson as the starting tight end. The promotion has played out on the field, where Pitta has garnered more playing time than Dickson. Pitta played 43 of 61 snaps, 50 of 69 and 42 of 72 in games against the Bengals, Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots, respectively. Over the same span, Dickson played 38, 40 and 39 snaps. Pitta has developed into quarterback Joe Flacco's favorite target.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2012
His mother's death 16 years ago came as a sudden shock to Sean Hull. Even more distressing was the family's discovery that Ida Hull had suffered in silence for years with sarcoidosis, a debilitating, often fatal disease that frequently attacks the lungs. "I made up my mind that I would do something for her and in her memory," said Hull, 47, a banker and NCAA college basketball official. "I am working in her spirit to fight this disease. " Proceeds from the fourth annual Flip-Flop Festivus Saturday at the Four Seasons hotel in Harbor East will help continue research into what the medical community calls an under-recognized disease.
NEWS
July 30, 2012
When former Gov.Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.proposed bringing slots to Maryland during his term in office, his most vocal critic wasMartin O'Malley, who called it the Devil's work because it would be a tax on the poor that encouraged them to try to win their way out of poverty. Mr. O'Malley and his allies made sure the issue never came to a vote. But after being elected governor, Mr. O'Malley changed his tune. Gambling is now everywhere: the lottery, Keno and multi-state games have saturated the poorest areas of the state.
NEWS
July 5, 2012
Remember in March, when former senator Rick Santorum got a lot of grief for saying that Mitt Romney was the "worst Republican" in the country to challenge President Barack Obama on health care reform? Well, turns out he was right. That was evident Wednesday when former governor Romney decided he couldn't leave well enough alone and, in a CBS television interview, declared Mr. Obama's individual health care insurance mandate was a tax. That directly contradicted what his campaign had been saying on the subject for two days and left the Republican in the uncomfortable position of having to explain why his own version of health care reform in Massachusetts, which also carried a mandate and a similar penalty, was somehow not a tax. The candidate's logic is, to put it kindly, nuanced.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | May 3, 2012
What's that you say? You don't hear much about President Barack Obama's flip-flopping? How about: 1) the Obama reversal regarding child farm-labor regulations; 2) the president's (to quote The New York Times) "revers[ing] his two-year-old order halting new military charges against detainees at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, permitting military trials to resume with revamped procedures but implicitly admitting the failure of his pledge to close the prison camp" (March 7, 2011); 3. the president's support of former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak, followed by his throwing him under the bus?
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | April 3, 2012
Mitt Romney has been treated rather roughly, even unfairly, by the national media. Yes, in December he challenged Rick Perry to a $10,000 bet - an amount interpreted to indicate the kinds of absurd sums an out-of-touch man of Mr. Romney's wealth and status might actually bet with a friend or colleague - over a dispute about the former Massachusetts governor's position on the individual health care mandate. But clearly Mr. Romney didn't mean to actually make such a bet, or at least not for that real amount; he said it to indicate his confidence that Mr. Perry was lying about his record.
NEWS
February 14, 2007
City senior Kia Baker doesn't always show up in the box score, but she plays a vital role for the Knights, who are on their way to the Baltimore City title game for a fourth straight season. She provides leadership to a team that usually starts two freshmen and two sophomores alongside her. Baker, who also plays volleyball and softball for the Knights, has a 3.5 grade point average while carrying a challenging academic load. In college, she plans to major in sports medicine and is considering playing basketball.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2010
Noah's Compass, by Anne Tyler. Alfred A. Knopf. $25.95 "You're the only Baltimorean I know who leaves his front door unlocked," Liam Pennywell's ex-wife tells him. "Even though you've had a burglary. But then any time someone walks in you complain that they're intruding. ... Here's solitary sad old Liam, only God help anybody who steps in and tries to get close." The main character in Anne Tyler's 18th novel, Liam sometimes senses that his life is "drying up and hardening, like one of those mouse carcasses you find beneath a radiator."
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | October 30, 2011
When the governor and the legislature saved Maryland horse racing again this past spring, everybody knew it wouldn't be for the last time. But the deal was supposed to buy a few years, if not crowds at the tracks. It didn't even do that. Frank Stronach, the aging Canadian tycoon who owns the Maryland Jockey Club, is threatening to slash the racing schedule unless he gets concessions. For the crisis to be resolved, policymakers and horse breeders will need to understand what Stronach wants.
NEWS
August 22, 2011
I see that Republican candidate Michele Bachmann is now "guaranteeing" gas will be $2 a gallon if she becomes president. Wow! As anyone familiar with the free market knows, there is only one way to guarantee that gas is going to be at the price set by a politician - price controls. Even the "lefty" President Obama hasn't suggested that. That puts Michele Bachmann to the left of Obama and the Democrats in Congress, even that lefty Bernie Sanders fromVermont. So in one day, Michele Bachmann has gone from right-wing darling to the very thing she claims to hate: a socialist!
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