Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFlintstones
IN THE NEWS

Flintstones

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 29, 1994
As crowds flock to "The Flintstones," one of the blockbuster summer movies that opens this weekend, they will guffaw at the garage-door opening lizard, the pigasaurus garbage disposal, the lobster lawn mower and other conveniences of life in fictional Bedrock.But don't laugh: It is we who are the modern, Stone Age family. We're still teetering on the precipice of the next technological revolution. Most of the experts agree they don't know where CD-Roms and interactive cable and virtual reality and "cyberchat" are going to lead us, or more accurately, where we are going to lead all of it. But they agree that life at the beginning of the 21st century will be much different from life at the end of the 20th.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | April 28, 2000
"The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas" is a tired piece of hackery, made only slightly less distasteful by a couple of inspired moments from supporting player Alan Cumming as a Modern Stone Age rock star. The live-action movie has preserved none of the punning humor or "Honeymooners" homages of the original Hanna-Barbera cartoon; instead, it seems to serve chiefly as an excuse for its makers to pocket a quick buck. Perhaps the most useful thing to emerge from a recent screening came from a youngster who midway through the movie began idly bopping himself on the forehead with an empty plastic soda bottle.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | May 27, 1994
It started a few nights ago, a horrible dream that left me shaken and sweat-soaked and obsessing about . . . the Flintstones.They were all there in the dream: Fred and Wilma, Betty and Barney Rubble and all their annoying kids and grinning domesticated dinosaurs, chasing me with flaming torches and yelling "Yabba-dabba-doo!" as we traversed some prehistoric suburban hell.And everywhere overhead there were huge, billowing clouds of smoke from a thousand pot-bellied cavemen grilling big, greasy bronto-burgers.
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2000
His recruiting trails have taken him from South Dakota to New Hampshire to tiny Shellman, Ga., in search of top-notch talent. There are, however, a few places Florida coach Billy Donovan, one of the most tireless recruiters in college basketball, will not go to find a player. Two of them are Los Angeles, where UCLA is, and Durham, N.C., home of Duke. So he goes to such places as Mitchell, S.D., where he found starting forward Mike Miller. "We try to pick guys that we feel would want to leave their geographic region or have to leave their geographic regions," Donovan said.
FEATURES
By Lynne Bumpus-Hooper and Lynne Bumpus-Hooper,Orlando Sentinel | June 10, 1994
If it has a Flintstone on it, in it or near it, you can probably find it in Karen Lee's Flintstones Room.We're talking wall-to-wall Bedrock here in this corner of Cocoa Beach, Fla.Collecting the trinkets, gadgets, dolls, toys and food products emblazoned with Wilma, Fred, Barney and Betty has been a way of life for the 32-year-old exercise specialist at Wuesthoff Hospital in Rockledge since she was 5."I think the first thing I got was a jelly jar glass. 'The Flintstones' used to come on every Monday at 7 p.m., and it was the highlight of my life," Ms. Lee said as she was giving a tour of her personal archive.
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | June 1, 1994
Most days, Fred Flintstone digs up rocks at the Slate & Co. quarry.But over the Memorial Day weekend, he struck gold.Confounding pundits who pegged it as more of a mega-flop thaa mega-hit, the live-action big-screen version of "The Flintstones" set off a sensational $37.2 million box-office avalanche over the four-day holiday weekend, according to industry estimates. That tops the previous Memorial Day weekend champ, "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade," which made $37.03 million in 1989.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday | April 28, 2000
"The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas" is a tired piece of hackery, made only slightly less distasteful by a couple of inspired moments from supporting player Alan Cumming as a Modern Stone Age rock star. The live-action movie has preserved none of the punning humor or "Honeymooners" homages of the original Hanna-Barbera cartoon; instead, it seems to serve chiefly as an excuse for its makers to pocket a quick buck. Perhaps the most useful thing to emerge from a recent screening came from a youngster who midway through the movie began idly bopping himself on the forehead with an empty plastic soda bottle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 27, 1994
The forces that drive big American studio movies -- the need for an instantly recognizeable product that transcends age, class and sex barriers; and the potential for ancillary marketing tie-ins -- may have made "The Flintstones" inevitable. But they didn't have to make it so enjoyable.Sure, it's more of a corporate statement sponsored by the stockholders of MCA Inc. and McDonald's than an actual movie. Sure, it's got an IQ of 54, a plot that would have seemed skimpy in the original half-hour TV cartoon format, and enough bad puns on the word "stone" to throw a rock at. But it also yields certain delights unattainable anywhere else on the landscape: John Goodman as Fred Flintstone, giving as much to "Yabba-Dabba-Doo" as Olivier gave to "To be, or not to be: that is the question"; and Elizabeth Taylor, tied up and dumped on a bearskin rug.The best thing about the movie is the movie.
NEWS
By Frank Rich | June 3, 1994
IT WASN'T the Devil who made me do it. I had no choice. If you were with your kids over the long Memorial Day weekend and they were dying to go to the movies and everyone was eager to get out of the house before cabin fever turned lethal, then you, too, made your way to "The Flintstones." It was the only new "family" movie at the multiplex for the holiday.This is why "The Flintstones" took in a record $37.5 million last weekend, and it is also why those millions of ticket buyers went back to school or work on Tuesday a bit more bummed out than usual.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | June 1, 1994
The Memorial Day weekend opening of "The Flintstones" was a major box-office success, which partly justifies tonight's TV schedule, which anticipated that favorable reaction by scheduling several positively prehistoric entertainment options. ABC begins presenting new episodes of its "Dinosaurs" sitcom, TBS has "Weird Al" Yankovic presenting old "Flintstones" cartoons in a format called Mastodon Theatre, and MTV presents an episode of "Unplugged" starring Tony Bennett.* "Dinosaurs." (8-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By Bob Kudelka and Bob Kudelka,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 10, 1994
Flintstones. Meet the Flintstones. They live in North Myrtle Beach, S.C.That's what it says in the Horry Telephone Cooperative and GTE phone books. They each have a listing for Dean O. Flintstone, living on Seaview Street in North Myrtle Beach."
FEATURES
By Lynne Bumpus-Hooper and Lynne Bumpus-Hooper,Orlando Sentinel | June 10, 1994
If it has a Flintstone on it, in it or near it, you can probably find it in Karen Lee's Flintstones Room.We're talking wall-to-wall Bedrock here in this corner of Cocoa Beach, Fla.Collecting the trinkets, gadgets, dolls, toys and food products emblazoned with Wilma, Fred, Barney and Betty has been a way of life for the 32-year-old exercise specialist at Wuesthoff Hospital in Rockledge since she was 5."I think the first thing I got was a jelly jar glass. 'The Flintstones' used to come on every Monday at 7 p.m., and it was the highlight of my life," Ms. Lee said as she was giving a tour of her personal archive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gary Graff and Gary Graff,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | June 3, 1994
We don't just watch movies anymore. We listen to them, too.Movie soundtracks have become a big deal in the music biz -- so big that the No. 1 album in the country this week is the modern rock-laden soundtrack to "The Crow." It's joined in the Top 10 by "Above the Rim."Five other soundtracks are among Billboard's Top 100 albums; "The Bodyguard," which is at No. 54, notches its 79th week on the chart.This trend warms the hearts and ledgers of executives in Hollywood and the music industry. A big soundtrack generates more revenue for the film's bottom line.
NEWS
By Frank Rich | June 3, 1994
IT WASN'T the Devil who made me do it. I had no choice. If you were with your kids over the long Memorial Day weekend and they were dying to go to the movies and everyone was eager to get out of the house before cabin fever turned lethal, then you, too, made your way to "The Flintstones." It was the only new "family" movie at the multiplex for the holiday.This is why "The Flintstones" took in a record $37.5 million last weekend, and it is also why those millions of ticket buyers went back to school or work on Tuesday a bit more bummed out than usual.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | June 1, 1994
The Memorial Day weekend opening of "The Flintstones" was a major box-office success, which partly justifies tonight's TV schedule, which anticipated that favorable reaction by scheduling several positively prehistoric entertainment options. ABC begins presenting new episodes of its "Dinosaurs" sitcom, TBS has "Weird Al" Yankovic presenting old "Flintstones" cartoons in a format called Mastodon Theatre, and MTV presents an episode of "Unplugged" starring Tony Bennett.* "Dinosaurs." (8-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | June 1, 1994
Most days, Fred Flintstone digs up rocks at the Slate & Co. quarry.But over the Memorial Day weekend, he struck gold.Confounding pundits who pegged it as more of a mega-flop thaa mega-hit, the live-action big-screen version of "The Flintstones" set off a sensational $37.2 million box-office avalanche over the four-day holiday weekend, according to industry estimates. That tops the previous Memorial Day weekend champ, "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade," which made $37.03 million in 1989.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | May 27, 1994
THE FLINTSTONES: MUSIC FROM BEDROCKOriginal Motion Picture Soundtrack (MCA 11045)THE FLINTSTONES: MODERN STONE-AGE MELODIESOriginal TV Show Soundtrack (Rhino 71649)Forget about Fred and Barney. If you really want to gauge how deeply the Flintstone phenomenon is ingrained on the American psyche, sing a few bars of "Meet the Flintstones" and see how many people join in. Even more impressive is the consistent quality of the other music featured on the original TV show. Skim through "The Flintstones: Modern Stone-Age Melodies," and odds are you'll know half the songs by heart, from the zippy "Car Hop Song" to the dippy "Open Up Your Heart and Let the Sun Shine In."
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | May 30, 1994
"The Flintstones," a live-action version of the cartoon, opened Friday. So what's new? Nothing, really. Seems as though we've seen and heard everything before, in some way, shape or form, from TV shows to movies and even to obnoxious beer commercials in which the perseverance of some pop forms is celebrated in tiresome conversation. Ginger or Mary Ann? Does it really matter?Well, maybe it does. Some things (including "Gilligan's Island," by the way, which is on tap for the big screen with Adam Sandler as Gilligan)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.