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Flint Gregory Hunt

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By Kate Shatzkin | July 6, 1997
We stood before the death chamber, in a stuffy little room where we had come from another stuffy little room in the middle of the night.With the sureness of a voting-booth screen, a beige curtain snapped back. The reporter next to me lifted his pen from his pad and crossed himself.In front of us was Flint Gregory Hunt, only it was not the Flint Gregory Hunt I had interviewed two weeks before. That man, scheduled to die for the murder of Baltimore police Officer Vincent Adolfo, was animated, outspoken, shifting in his chair as emotions of all kinds crossed his face.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | July 6, 1997
We stood before the death chamber, in a stuffy little room where we had come from another stuffy little room in the middle of the night.With the sureness of a voting-booth screen, a beige curtain snapped back. The reporter next to me lifted his pen from his pad and crossed himself.In front of us was Flint Gregory Hunt, only it was not the Flint Gregory Hunt I had interviewed two weeks before. That man, scheduled to die for the murder of Baltimore police Officer Vincent Adolfo, was animated, outspoken, shifting in his chair as emotions of all kinds crossed his face.
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NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1997
Flint Gregory Hunt does not plan to go gentle into that good night.As the hour of his execution approaches, scheduled for the week of June 30, he does not want to be seen going peacefully, to have the calm death that lethal injection can convey.He wants his passing to be ugly, in the gas chamber, where he thinks it will look like "murder."In an interview yesterday at the Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center -- "Supermax" -- in East Baltimore, Hunt spoke of his remorse, his anger, and occasionally, his fear.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1997
Karen Adolfo's hate is finally leaving her.She will never forgive Flint Gregory Hunt for gunning down her husband, Baltimore police Officer Vincent J. Adolfo, nearly 12 years ago. But as she watched Hunt die by lethal injection early yesterday, the uncontrollable "ugly" feelings that have twisted her heart for all that time began to flow away as surely as the deadly drugs entered the killer's bloodstream."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1997
Karen Adolfo's hate is finally leaving her.She will never forgive Flint Gregory Hunt for gunning down her husband, Baltimore police Officer Vincent J. Adolfo, nearly 12 years ago. But as she watched Hunt die by lethal injection early yesterday, the uncontrollable "ugly" feelings that have twisted her heart for all that time began to flow away as surely as the deadly drugs entered the killer's bloodstream."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | June 9, 1996
A BLACK MAN SHOT a white police officer during a robbery and was sentenced to death. Fighting to save his life, he came forward with numbers, with perhaps the most respected study yet, that showed that the race of his victim -- white -- made it much more likely statistically that he would end up facing the electric chair than any other characteristic of his crime.The man was Warren McCleskey, and in 1987 he came close to convincing the U.S. Supreme Court he should not be executed. But the court voted, 5-4, that unless McCleskey had proof of discrimination in his own case, he had no constitutional right to escape the death penalty.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | June 26, 1997
The American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland and several prominent Marylanders petitioned the governor yesterday to stay the execution of Flint Gregory Hunt, pending study of racial disparity in use of the death penalty.One dozen opponents of the execution stated in the petition that Maryland applies the death penalty to African-Americans more often than it does to others. They noted the December 1996 recommendation by a governor's task force that the state examine why this is the case.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court yesterday declined to hear Flint Gregory Hunt's appeal challenging his death sentence for killing a Baltimore policeman six years ago.The Baltimore man contended in his appeal that the jury saw him wearing leg irons throughout the sentencing phase and was prejudiced against him because of that.He also argued that the jury was told improperly about two letters he had written from prison that talked about possible ways to escape.Hunt was convicted of killing, with two gunshots, Officer Vincent Adolfo during a struggle in a Baltimore alley Nov. 18, 1985.
NEWS
June 22, 1997
Flint Gregory Hunt was married yesterday at the Supermax prison in Baltimore, across the street from the Maryland Penitentiary where he is to be executed in the gas chamber next week.The Muslim ceremony was attended by Hunt's mother, sister, son and six corrections officials, said Leonard A. Sipes Jr., a state prisons spokesman.Sipes said that by law, he could not identify the bride.After the 15-minute ceremony, Hunt hugged his new wife and was taken back to his cell in the state's most secure prison.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | June 25, 1997
Gov. Parris N. Glendening announced yesterday he was rejecting condemned killer Flint Gregory Hunt's second petition for clemency -- one day after it was submitted.Lawyers for Hunt, who is scheduled to die in the state's gas chamber next week for the 1985 killing of Baltimore police Officer Vincent J. Adolfo, submitted a 28-page petition Monday on their client's behalf. They argued that the governor should consider that jurors in Hunt's case were not given the option of sentencing him to life without parole, and that a task force has recommended studying in detail whether racial disparities exist in the application of capital punishment in Maryland.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1997
Flint Gregory Hunt does not plan to go gentle into that good night.As the hour of his execution approaches, scheduled for the week of June 30, he does not want to be seen going peacefully, to have the calm death that lethal injection can convey.He wants his passing to be ugly, in the gas chamber, where he thinks it will look like "murder."In an interview yesterday at the Maryland Correctional Adjustment Center -- "Supermax" -- in East Baltimore, Hunt spoke of his remorse, his anger, and occasionally, his fear.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | June 9, 1996
A BLACK MAN SHOT a white police officer during a robbery and was sentenced to death. Fighting to save his life, he came forward with numbers, with perhaps the most respected study yet, that showed that the race of his victim -- white -- made it much more likely statistically that he would end up facing the electric chair than any other characteristic of his crime.The man was Warren McCleskey, and in 1987 he came close to convincing the U.S. Supreme Court he should not be executed. But the court voted, 5-4, that unless McCleskey had proof of discrimination in his own case, he had no constitutional right to escape the death penalty.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | June 2, 1996
When the Rev. Jesse L. Jackson emerged from his 30 minutes of jail-house prayer and reflection with the convicted police killer Flint Gregory Hunt on Thursday, a man quietly asked him, "What did Hunt talk about?""Let's go over here," Jackson said, peering beyond his little circle of supporters to a spot about 20 yards north, where television cameras and microphones were waiting in the twinkly sunlight.Jackson's media people had set a press conference for 11 o'clock. Since Jackson had airplaned in for his meeting with Hunt, and since he'd arrived a little late, it was remarkable how he was now emerging right on time for all the gathered news media.
NEWS
By Stacey Patton | July 8, 1997
FLINT GREGORY HUNT is finally dead. For weeks we waited for his execution, getting to know him through his desperate efforts to save his own life.What happens now? Hunt's family will bury him. Officer Vince Adolfo's widow, 12 years later, says she will get on, finally, with her life. Protesters will drop their signs and return to their normal lives.There are no more appeals. The final rejections have been issued. The waiting is over.As Hunt ate his last meal and said his final goodbyes, what went through his mind?
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