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December 20, 2005
Dr. John F. Ullsperger, a retired obstetrician and gynecologist, died of cancer Thursday at his Timonium home. He was 86. Born in Baltimore and raised near Patterson Park, he attended St. James the Less Parochial School and was a 1937 Loyola High School graduate. During World War II he was an Army Air Corps flight surgeon and served in the Philippines. He earned a medical degree from the University of Maryland and practiced at St. Joseph and Mercy medical centers. In his career, until his 1987 retirement, Dr. Ullsperger delivered several thousand babies, family members said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 22, 2011
Dr. Lester Aubrey Wall Jr., a retired Baltimore internist who during his professional career personified the virtues of the old-fashioned general practitioner, died Tuesday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at a daughter's home in The Woodlands, Texas. The longtime Guilford and Towson resident was 94. The son of a banker and homemaker, Dr. Wall was born in Baltimore and raised on Kenwood Avenue. He was a 1933 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in 1937 from St. John's College in Annapolis.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | December 9, 1993
When the space mechanics repairing the Hubble Space Telescope go to work, the flight surgeon at Mission Control knows how fast their hearts are beating.He knows if they sweat, breathe heavily or laugh.What he doesn't necessarily know is whether they are tired. And the mechanics don't volunteer much about that."Fatigue has to be self-reported," said Dr. Richard T. Jennings, a NASA flight surgeon who has monitored three shuttle flights. "We'll let these guys tell us if this is too much or not."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 3, 2009
Dr. John Hamilton Allan, a retired orthopedist and flight surgeon during World War II and the Korean and Vietnam wars, died of a heart attack Saturday at his Stevenson home. He was 101. Born in Stamford, Conn., he earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University and was editor of the yearbook, The Hullabaloo. He also belonged to the Tudor and Stuart Literary Club and was 1929 class vice president. He then graduated from the Hopkins School of Medicine and did his internship at the Union Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | June 3, 2009
Dr. John Hamilton Allan, a retired orthopedist and flight surgeon during World War II and the Korean and Vietnam wars, died of a heart attack Saturday at his Stevenson home. He was 101. Born in Stamford, Conn., he earned a bachelor's degree from the Johns Hopkins University and was editor of the yearbook, The Hullabaloo. He also belonged to the Tudor and Stuart Literary Club and was 1929 class vice president. He then graduated from the Hopkins School of Medicine and did his internship at the Union Memorial Hospital.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 1992
DOTHAN, Ala. -- On a cold night during her week-long captivity in Iraq in the Persian Gulf war, Maj. Rhonda Cornum was loaded into a pickup truck with another American prisoner of war, a young male sergeant, and taken from an underground bunker to a small prison. During the 30-minute drive, an Iraqi guard kissed her repeatedly, pulled a blanket over their heads so that they would not be seen, unzipped her flight suit and fondled her breasts.Major Cornum, a 37-year-old flight surgeon and biochemist from New York, had broken both arms, smashed her knee and had a bullet in her right shoulder as a result of the downing of her Army helicopter.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 22, 2011
Dr. Lester Aubrey Wall Jr., a retired Baltimore internist who during his professional career personified the virtues of the old-fashioned general practitioner, died Tuesday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at a daughter's home in The Woodlands, Texas. The longtime Guilford and Towson resident was 94. The son of a banker and homemaker, Dr. Wall was born in Baltimore and raised on Kenwood Avenue. He was a 1933 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree in 1937 from St. John's College in Annapolis.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 23, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Navy has reassigned the first female pilot qualified to fly combat missions from an aircraft carrier because she had problems landing on the ship, Navy officials confirmed yesterday.Lt. Shannon Workman, 28, of Cumberland, Md., has returned to a Navy command in Norfolk, Va., from her assignment as an EA-6B pilot aboard the aircraft carrier Eisenhower in the Adriatic Sea because of performance problems, Cmdr. Stephen Pietropaoli, a Navy spokesman, said.Navy officials were quick to point out that a male pilot in the same EA-6B squadron, Lt. Gerald DiLeonardo, was ordered off the ship for the same reason.
NEWS
September 23, 1993
Fatal sliver:Investigators have determined that the blade of a U.S. Marine Corps attack helicopter made in Fort Worth, Texas, cracked Sept. 8 because of a sliver of metal between the blade and the protective strip of metal covering its leading edge.The crash of the Bell Helicopter Textron AH-1W, the Marines' primary attack helicopter, prompted the U.S. military to ground all 124 aircraft. In the crash, a Marine pilot and Navy flight surgeon were killed after witnesses said the craft appeared to come apart in flight and crashed at Montgomery Field in San Diego.
NEWS
October 25, 2002
Dr. Milton J. Layden, a retired psychiatrist, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Sunday at the Jewish Convalescent Home in Pikesville. He was 90, and lived in Northwest Baltimore and Guilford. He practiced on the staff of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and saw patients at his office in the Wynnewood Towers Apartments on Cold Spring Lane. He wrote Escaping the Hostility Trap, a book published by Prentice-Hall in 1977. Born in Baltimore and raised on Whittier Avenue, he was a 1930 graduate of City College, where he played on the tennis team.
NEWS
December 20, 2005
Dr. John F. Ullsperger, a retired obstetrician and gynecologist, died of cancer Thursday at his Timonium home. He was 86. Born in Baltimore and raised near Patterson Park, he attended St. James the Less Parochial School and was a 1937 Loyola High School graduate. During World War II he was an Army Air Corps flight surgeon and served in the Philippines. He earned a medical degree from the University of Maryland and practiced at St. Joseph and Mercy medical centers. In his career, until his 1987 retirement, Dr. Ullsperger delivered several thousand babies, family members said.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | December 9, 1993
When the space mechanics repairing the Hubble Space Telescope go to work, the flight surgeon at Mission Control knows how fast their hearts are beating.He knows if they sweat, breathe heavily or laugh.What he doesn't necessarily know is whether they are tired. And the mechanics don't volunteer much about that."Fatigue has to be self-reported," said Dr. Richard T. Jennings, a NASA flight surgeon who has monitored three shuttle flights. "We'll let these guys tell us if this is too much or not."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 1992
DOTHAN, Ala. -- On a cold night during her week-long captivity in Iraq in the Persian Gulf war, Maj. Rhonda Cornum was loaded into a pickup truck with another American prisoner of war, a young male sergeant, and taken from an underground bunker to a small prison. During the 30-minute drive, an Iraqi guard kissed her repeatedly, pulled a blanket over their heads so that they would not be seen, unzipped her flight suit and fondled her breasts.Major Cornum, a 37-year-old flight surgeon and biochemist from New York, had broken both arms, smashed her knee and had a bullet in her right shoulder as a result of the downing of her Army helicopter.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1995
The first woman who qualified to fly Navy combat aircraft has been reassigned to fly a cargo jet in a support squadron, Navy officials said yesterday.Lt. Shannon Workman, 28, who was removed from the USS Eisenhower in January because she had trouble landing her EA-6B radar jamming jet on the aircraft carrier, is to report in April to the Naval Air Station in Norfolk to train as a pilot on the cargo plane, said Cmdr. Kevin Wensing, a spokesman for the Atlantic Fleet.Lieutenant Workman, a 1988 Naval Academy graduate from Cumberland, was taken off the Eisenhower after officials found her carrier landings to be inconsistent.
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