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BUSINESS
By JIM COATES and JIM COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 20, 2006
My computer freezes up a lot when I run the Microsoft Flight Simulator program. I will be flying and without rhyme or reason the video freezes while the sound continues to "fly on," including the engine sounds and the air traffic control chatter. I cannot "unfreeze" the video and must perform a "crash reboot" by shutting off the computer and restarting. I get the "fatal error" info box and I am attaching a copy of a recent data block. The errors all seem to be similar for each lockup. I have sought help through Microsoft and eMachines without resolution.
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2013
The runway at Martin State Airport fell away as the distant Baltimore skyline popped into view. A hint of turbulence jittered the pilot's seat during a banking maneuver that filled the cockpit windshield with the vast blueness of the Chesapeake Bay. After a quick series of adjustments and a moment of indecision came the satisfying thump of wheels touching down. It felt mighty good to be back on the ground. But then again, the student never left. At Middle River Aviation, instructors can teach the fundamentals of flight in an airplane or in a new full-motion simulator that pitches and rolls in every direction - even straight into a death spiral.
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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | August 10, 1999
Inside Room H-132 at Catonsville's community college sits the sprawling runway complex at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.Starting this fall, students will take off and land from there using a $20,000 flight simulator. Along the way, these would-be pilots will encounter fire in their plane's cockpit, run out of fuel and be forced to land under foggy conditions.To deal with such hair-raising emergencies, however, students will only have to step outside the simulator and solve problems with their professor.
BUSINESS
By JIM COATES and JIM COATES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 20, 2006
My computer freezes up a lot when I run the Microsoft Flight Simulator program. I will be flying and without rhyme or reason the video freezes while the sound continues to "fly on," including the engine sounds and the air traffic control chatter. I cannot "unfreeze" the video and must perform a "crash reboot" by shutting off the computer and restarting. I get the "fatal error" info box and I am attaching a copy of a recent data block. The errors all seem to be similar for each lockup. I have sought help through Microsoft and eMachines without resolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2001
When Dan DiBacco was a child, he loved to build World War II model airplanes. "My uncles were pilots during the war and they used to tell me stories," says the 39-year-old software engineer for a Santa Clara, Calif., company. Today DiBacco designs and "builds" his own planes in a virtual world where he and others can download aircraft through the Internet and fly them on their PC screens. Their community revolves around Microsoft's Combat Flight Simulator 2, last year's entry in a long line of flying programs from a software giant better known for its operating system, word processor, spreadsheet and antitrust convictions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2001
Every time I fly on a passenger jet, I dream of being in the cockpit. In reality, I just want to be in control so I won't feel so helpless if things go poorly. Wilco Publishing puts you in control, all right, with "767 Pilot in Command" ($40), a PC flight simulator with a twist: You learn how to deal with the kinds of in-flight emergencies that sometimes crash jumbo jets. Released as an add-on to Microsoft's "Flight Simulator 2000," Pilot in Command lets you experience an engine fire, depressurization, wind shear and several other emergencies while flying the 767-300.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL STROH and MICHAEL STROH,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1999
Ensign Herb Lacy was in trouble.True, he'd fulfilled a lifelong dream by making it into the Navy's highly competitive flight school, but now he was competing with classmates who had already taken private flying lessons -- or even held a pilot's license.Lacy, who had never flown, needed an edge. He found it in an unlikely place: a computer game.By the time he squeezed into a real cockpit for the first time, Lacy had logged nearly 50 hours on Microsoft's Flight Simulator 98, a version of the oldest, most popular PC simulation on the market.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | August 11, 1993
In another move to return MicroProse Inc. to profitability, the computer game maker yesterday laid off about 25 employees from its Hunt Valley headquarters.A terse announcement released yesterday evening said the reduction of its U.S.-based staff was part of MicroProse's "ongoing restructuring plans" and that the remaining 150 employees in Hunt Valley would continue operations there. MicroProse has more than 300 employees worldwide.The announcement did not specify the number of layoffs, but sources within the company said the number was about 25.Vice President Gerard R. Blair said last night he does not expect further layoffs at Hunt Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2000
Joystick system offers realistic feel for flight simulators In piloting your flight simulator games on the PC, it would be difficult to find a better product than the X36 Flight Control System. Saitek's $99.95 package comes in two parts, a joystick and a throttle/rudder controller. The joystick is the primary steering device. It also has a safety switch that can be flipped down for launching missiles. The other device is for precise speed control and operating the plane's rudder. Taken together, the joystick and throttle/rudder controller are among the best available, although becoming comfortable with them might take awhile for novices.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 2001
KABUL, Afghanistan - A flight simulator computer program, a list of flight schools in the United States and documents describing chemical, biological and nuclear warfare and referring to the al-Qaida organization were found yesterday in two houses littered with paper. Some of the documents - in addition to 19 highly advanced French-made Milan antitank missiles discovered Thursday - were in a house that belonged to the Ministry of Defense of the former Taliban government. Other documents were found in a private residence two miles away in the same upscale district of Kabul.
NEWS
By RICHARD A. SERRANO and RICHARD A. SERRANO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 10, 2006
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- He never could fly right. In practice sessions with his instructor, Zacarias Moussaoui couldn't keep the plane level. He was bad at banking, always turning the plane too sharply. When they entered a heavy traffic pattern, he would tense up. He wouldn't focus. His instructors told him that he was a disaster, that he never would fly. And yet when he was arrested by the FBI and suspected of being a terrorist, he grew angry and kept telling the agents over and over to hurry their investigation "because I've got to get back to flight school."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2002
Two years after switching careers to follow his dream of becoming a commercial pilot, Mark Yingling, 30, of Springfield, Va., is just a few months away from earning the right to charge for his services. Christopher Crews, 17, of Brooklyn Park was playing with model rockets and radio-control planes five years ago. Now, he has logged more than 65 hours of flight time and passed the exams to be licensed as a private pilot. His goal is to get his commercial rating within two years and earn the bachelor's degree in aviation required of commercial airline pilots.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 2001
KABUL, Afghanistan - A flight simulator computer program, a list of flight schools in the United States and documents describing chemical, biological and nuclear warfare and referring to the al-Qaida organization were found yesterday in two houses littered with paper. Some of the documents - in addition to 19 highly advanced French-made Milan antitank missiles discovered Thursday - were in a house that belonged to the Ministry of Defense of the former Taliban government. Other documents were found in a private residence two miles away in the same upscale district of Kabul.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2001
When Dan DiBacco was a child, he loved to build World War II model airplanes. "My uncles were pilots during the war and they used to tell me stories," says the 39-year-old software engineer for a Santa Clara, Calif., company. Today DiBacco designs and "builds" his own planes in a virtual world where he and others can download aircraft through the Internet and fly them on their PC screens. Their community revolves around Microsoft's Combat Flight Simulator 2, last year's entry in a long line of flying programs from a software giant better known for its operating system, word processor, spreadsheet and antitrust convictions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2001
Every time I fly on a passenger jet, I dream of being in the cockpit. In reality, I just want to be in control so I won't feel so helpless if things go poorly. Wilco Publishing puts you in control, all right, with "767 Pilot in Command" ($40), a PC flight simulator with a twist: You learn how to deal with the kinds of in-flight emergencies that sometimes crash jumbo jets. Released as an add-on to Microsoft's "Flight Simulator 2000," Pilot in Command lets you experience an engine fire, depressurization, wind shear and several other emergencies while flying the 767-300.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2001
There was a Toys R Us across the street, but all the kids were lined up outside Annapolis Mall yesterday for the newest toy in town: the U.S. Air Force Experience. Who could blame them? A real F-16 Fighting Falcon on display in the parking lot lured them to the high-tech recruiting exhibition that rolled into this Navy town Tuesday. Inside the huge trailer, the show aimed for its audience with giant video screen presentations, computer kiosks and a fleet of F-16 flight simulators that dared them to pilot a high-speed virtual mission.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2002
Two years after switching careers to follow his dream of becoming a commercial pilot, Mark Yingling, 30, of Springfield, Va., is just a few months away from earning the right to charge for his services. Christopher Crews, 17, of Brooklyn Park was playing with model rockets and radio-control planes five years ago. Now, he has logged more than 65 hours of flight time and passed the exams to be licensed as a private pilot. His goal is to get his commercial rating within two years and earn the bachelor's degree in aviation required of commercial airline pilots.
BUSINESS
By Steve Auerweck and Steve Auerweck,Staff Writer | April 5, 1993
Super Strike Eagle elevates MicroProseHunt Valley-based MicroProse Software Inc. says its first mission into 16-bit video game territory is off to a solid start.An initial order of 50,000 copies of Super Strike Eagle for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System sold out in March, and another production run is on order for this quarter.MicroProse has a licensing deal with Asmik Corp., a division of Sumitomo Corp., for distribution of Super Strike Eagle in Japan. Asmik will also convert Civilization to the Super Nintendo system; Asmik will sell the cartridge in Japan, and MicroProse will sell it in the rest of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Washington and Kevin Washington,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2000
When I reviewed a trio of World War II combat flight simulations for the PC two years ago, I had one minor disappointment: All three sat you in fighters in the European Theater. Last month, Microsoft released "Combat Flight Simulator 2: WWII Pacific Theater," which rectifies the imbalance. It's a smart move to attract those of us who remember with fondness the movie "Midway" and the NBC television show "Baa Baa Black Sheep," both of which appeared in the 1970s and featured fighter combat in the Pacific.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2000
Joystick system offers realistic feel for flight simulators In piloting your flight simulator games on the PC, it would be difficult to find a better product than the X36 Flight Control System. Saitek's $99.95 package comes in two parts, a joystick and a throttle/rudder controller. The joystick is the primary steering device. It also has a safety switch that can be flipped down for launching missiles. The other device is for precise speed control and operating the plane's rudder. Taken together, the joystick and throttle/rudder controller are among the best available, although becoming comfortable with them might take awhile for novices.
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