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NEWS
October 22, 2013
In a recent story about implementing the Common Core standards, reporter Liz Bowie quoted Baltimore County School Superintendent Dallas Dance as saying of the new curriculum: "We are building the plane as we fly it, but let's be clear; our passengers are safe" ( "Teachers complain about access to new curriculum Sept. 23). Seriously? It sounds like the pilots are being expected to fly without a flight plan or an operations manual. Kim Vicchio, Catonsville
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NEWS
October 22, 2013
In a recent story about implementing the Common Core standards, reporter Liz Bowie quoted Baltimore County School Superintendent Dallas Dance as saying of the new curriculum: "We are building the plane as we fly it, but let's be clear; our passengers are safe" ( "Teachers complain about access to new curriculum Sept. 23). Seriously? It sounds like the pilots are being expected to fly without a flight plan or an operations manual. Kim Vicchio, Catonsville
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SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | October 4, 1995
NEW YORK -- They were in Texas on Sunday, Seattle on Monday and here yesterday after flying all night across the country on a rollicking team charter.Talk about sleepless in Seattle."When did you get in?" someone asked Lou Piniella, manager of the Seattle Mariners, before Game 1 of his team's divisional series against the New York Yankees last night at Yankee Stadium."We got to the hotel around 4 in the morning," Piniella said some 12 hours later in his office, pulling hard on a cigarette and contemplating a shave.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | February 21, 2009
INDIANAPOLIS - Rex Ryan never met a quarterback he didn't think he could rattle. Never faced an offense he didn't believe he could confuse. Never drew up a blitz he wasn't confident would work. The new coach of the New York Jets is no introvert. Ask him about playing in the AFC East and he doesn't give you a politically correct answer. "I'd rather focus on what they're up against," Ryan said yesterday, addressing the national media during the NFL scouting combine. "We're going to have a team that's a physical football team.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | May 13, 2001
If you're one of the millions of Americans planning to travel by air this summer, here's a tip from the travel experts: DON'T wait until the last minute to make your arrangements! Order your cyanide pills NOW. Yes, it's a stressful time for air travelers. To understand why, let's look at some statistics: * This summer, U.S. airlines will operate 310,000 flights carrying 73 million passengers, no two of whom will pay the same fare. * Of these 310,000 flights, 82 percent are expected to experience delays classified by the airlines as "significant," defined as "longer than two days."
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2003
US Airways Group Inc. is scheduled to emerge from bankruptcy tomorrow after having shed almost 17,000 employees, 128 airplanes and $2.1 billion in debt in what is being hailed as a textbook restructuring that could serve as a model for the teetering aviation industry. The airline will emerge under the control of the Retirement Systems of Alabama, which provided a critical $500 million in financing during the company's restructuring and will invest $240 million in the company once it leaves bankruptcy.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2002
After viewing a presentation last night about proposed flight plans out of Baltimore-Washington International Airport, Howard County officials said they would push for an option that would reduce airplane noise for nearly 45,000 Maryland residents - most of them in Howard County. The federal government has final say over the flight plans, but "if we get enough support, they will have to listen," said Del. Shane Pendergrass, a Howard Democrat. "People are already suffering [because of noise]
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2003
Federal Aviation Administration investigators said yesterday that the pilot of the small plane that ran out of fuel and crashed into woods in White Marsh Sunday afternoon told air traffic controllers he was low on fuel about 20 minutes before the Cessna 172 went down. The pilot, who circled the area for about an hour because controllers couldn't find his flight plans, could have declared an emergency and landed before he was out of fuel, aviation officials and experts say. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating why controllers didn't give the pilot approval to land sooner and whether the pilot had properly filed his flight plans.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford | April 2, 2000
US Airways finally appeared to be putting its labor problems behind it last week after reaching a last-minute agreement with its 10,000 flight attendants. The tentative five-year pact marks the last hurdle for the recently troubled operation, which has operated in the red for three quarters. The airline, which still has the highest costs per mile in the industry, has cut some expenses by forming its low-fare subsidiary, MetroJet, and it has fixed the computer problems and resolved the maintenance schedule delays that troubled it earlier this year.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
Variations in the rules for flying in restricted airspace allowed the pilot whose plane crashed Sunday in White Marsh to take off from Martin State Airport but not land there a few hours later, an aviation expert said yesterday. Questions about why the pilot, 41-year-old Dale Roger of Lutherville, wasn't given clearance to land surfaced after he ran out of fuel waiting for the OK from air traffic controllers. But the crash also highlighted the complicated procedures pilots must follow as a result of the Sept.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
Variations in the rules for flying in restricted airspace allowed the pilot whose plane crashed Sunday in White Marsh to take off from Martin State Airport but not land there a few hours later, an aviation expert said yesterday. Questions about why the pilot, 41-year-old Dale Roger of Lutherville, wasn't given clearance to land surfaced after he ran out of fuel waiting for the OK from air traffic controllers. But the crash also highlighted the complicated procedures pilots must follow as a result of the Sept.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2003
Federal Aviation Administration investigators said yesterday that the pilot of the small plane that ran out of fuel and crashed into woods in White Marsh Sunday afternoon told air traffic controllers he was low on fuel about 20 minutes before the Cessna 172 went down. The pilot, who circled the area for about an hour because controllers couldn't find his flight plans, could have declared an emergency and landed before he was out of fuel, aviation officials and experts say. The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating why controllers didn't give the pilot approval to land sooner and whether the pilot had properly filed his flight plans.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2003
US Airways Group Inc. is scheduled to emerge from bankruptcy tomorrow after having shed almost 17,000 employees, 128 airplanes and $2.1 billion in debt in what is being hailed as a textbook restructuring that could serve as a model for the teetering aviation industry. The airline will emerge under the control of the Retirement Systems of Alabama, which provided a critical $500 million in financing during the company's restructuring and will invest $240 million in the company once it leaves bankruptcy.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2002
After viewing a presentation last night about proposed flight plans out of Baltimore-Washington International Airport, Howard County officials said they would push for an option that would reduce airplane noise for nearly 45,000 Maryland residents - most of them in Howard County. The federal government has final say over the flight plans, but "if we get enough support, they will have to listen," said Del. Shane Pendergrass, a Howard Democrat. "People are already suffering [because of noise]
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2001
The terrorist hijackings Sept. 11 that have grounded many fearful Americans have had the opposite effect on three-time Olympian Bonny Warner. Warner wanted to get back flying as soon as possible, so she requested and received her old job back as a United Airlines pilot. Warner, 39, a five-time U.S. champion in luge, is a captain who flies 737s for United. She was on a leave of absence since July to train full time for a berth as a bobsled driver in the 2002 Winter Olympics, but when terrorists hijacked four planes, including two United flights, Warner could think of nothing else but to get back into the air. "I came back to make a statement," she told The Gazette of Colorado Springs.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | May 13, 2001
If you're one of the millions of Americans planning to travel by air this summer, here's a tip from the travel experts: DON'T wait until the last minute to make your arrangements! Order your cyanide pills NOW. Yes, it's a stressful time for air travelers. To understand why, let's look at some statistics: * This summer, U.S. airlines will operate 310,000 flights carrying 73 million passengers, no two of whom will pay the same fare. * Of these 310,000 flights, 82 percent are expected to experience delays classified by the airlines as "significant," defined as "longer than two days."
SPORTS
By Andy Knobel and Andy Knobel,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2001
The terrorist hijackings Sept. 11 that have grounded many fearful Americans have had the opposite effect on three-time Olympian Bonny Warner. Warner wanted to get back flying as soon as possible, so she requested and received her old job back as a United Airlines pilot. Warner, 39, a five-time U.S. champion in luge, is a captain who flies 737s for United. She was on a leave of absence since July to train full time for a berth as a bobsled driver in the 2002 Winter Olympics, but when terrorists hijacked four planes, including two United flights, Warner could think of nothing else but to get back into the air. "I came back to make a statement," she told The Gazette of Colorado Springs.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | February 21, 2009
INDIANAPOLIS - Rex Ryan never met a quarterback he didn't think he could rattle. Never faced an offense he didn't believe he could confuse. Never drew up a blitz he wasn't confident would work. The new coach of the New York Jets is no introvert. Ask him about playing in the AFC East and he doesn't give you a politically correct answer. "I'd rather focus on what they're up against," Ryan said yesterday, addressing the national media during the NFL scouting combine. "We're going to have a team that's a physical football team.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford | April 2, 2000
US Airways finally appeared to be putting its labor problems behind it last week after reaching a last-minute agreement with its 10,000 flight attendants. The tentative five-year pact marks the last hurdle for the recently troubled operation, which has operated in the red for three quarters. The airline, which still has the highest costs per mile in the industry, has cut some expenses by forming its low-fare subsidiary, MetroJet, and it has fixed the computer problems and resolved the maintenance schedule delays that troubled it earlier this year.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1998
The Ravens went into Friday night's preseason finale against the New York Giants as the best defense in the NFL.Think about that. Suspend the cold reality that the preseason means nothing, that exhibition games are inhabited by countless players going nowhere in the big leagues, that offenses are notoriously conservative by design in August, generally tipping the scales in favor of defenses.Then, think about this. Two years ago, the Ravens came to Baltimore and unleashed one of the worst defenses in history upon the land.
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