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NEWS
January 19, 2002
George Welch Lacey III, a pilot and flight instructor, died Jan. 12 in an automobile accident on Route 152 in Fallston when his vehicle was struck by a truck that had crossed the center line. He was 54 and lived in Parkton. He was the owner and operator of Dayflight, a Parkton air-charter service. He also was a certified flight instructor. He had been a special agent for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Baltimore and volunteered in its Bald Eagle Project to protect endangered birds.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Richard A. Lowndes, a flight instructor and master picture framer, died June 15 of complications after heart surgery at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. The former Riderwood resident was 61. The son of a Maryland National Bank executive and a fine-arts appraiser, Richard Arden Lowndes was born in Baltimore and raised on Springway Road in Riderwood. He used his middle name of Arden. Mr. Lowndes was a great-grandson of Lloyd Lowndes Jr., who was elected Maryland governor in 1896.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
Richard A. Lowndes, a flight instructor and master picture framer, died June 15 of complications after heart surgery at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. The former Riderwood resident was 61. The son of a Maryland National Bank executive and a fine-arts appraiser, Richard Arden Lowndes was born in Baltimore and raised on Springway Road in Riderwood. He used his middle name of Arden. Mr. Lowndes was a great-grandson of Lloyd Lowndes Jr., who was elected Maryland governor in 1896.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
A mechanical problem forced a police helicopter pilot to make an emergency landing on the football field of a local high school in Columbia on Thursday night, a maneuver that caused "significant damage" to the aircraft but injured no one, according to Howard County Police. About 11:07 p.m., the pilot and three flight officers were responding to a police call when the undetermined problem occurred, police said. The pilot, a tenured officer and certified flight instructor, "spotted Wilde Lake High School nearby" using night-vision goggles and performed the emergency landing in the field, which sustained minimal damage.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | October 12, 2006
OAKLAND, Calif. --Oakland Athletics third baseman Eric Chavez was at home preparing for last night's Game 2 of the American League Championship Series when he saw a television report that a private plane had crashed into a 50-story New York apartment building. He dismissed the news as another nameless, faceless tragedy, then he headed to McAfee Coliseum. When he entered the home clubhouse, he learned that the dead pilot was New York Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle, a former Athletics teammate and friend of Chavez's, someone he and his wife often had dinner with in 2001 and 2002.
NEWS
January 1, 2006
Nicholas R. "Buddy" Rosewag Jr., a World War II flight instructor and telephone company engineer who became a farmer in middle age to fulfill a lifelong dream, died Dec. 24 at his home outside Ellicott City after a heart attack. He was 84. Born in Arbutus, he grew up in Berwyn and graduated from Hyattsville High School in 1937. Shortly after, he began working for C&P Telephone Co. before joining the Army in 1940. Mr. Rosewag spent nearly three years in the Army Air Forces as a flight instructor, and married Margaret Ann Joyce in 1943 while stationed in Florida.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 8, 1994
OPA-LOCKA, Fla. -- It didn't matter that the pilots couldn't speak English. Or that they couldn't fly.Pilot wannabes who found their way to Ernesto Arancibia, an Opa-locka flight instructor, and Edward McCorvey, a retired NTC Federal Aviation Administration safety inspector, needed only one thing, the federal investigators said: money.The men, longtime flying buddies, allegedly helped people who wouldn't have passed the FAA flight exam buy the pilot's certificate of their choice, Assistant U.S. Attorney Robert J. Bondi said.
NEWS
March 4, 1991
Services for Carsten Sierck Brinkmann, a stunt airplane pilot and aerobatics instructor, will be at 1 p.m. tomorrow at the Witzke Funeral Home, 1630 Edmondson Ave. in Catonsville.Mr. Brinkmann, who was 74, died of heart failure Friday at his Catonsville home.Born in Baltimore, he attended Catonsville High School. He served as a pilot with the U.S. Navy from 1942 to 1946.After the war, he worked in construction before he became a full-time flight instructor -- first independently, and then for Frederick Aviation, an aircraft sales and services company at Frederick Airport.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 20, 1992
She works out of an office not much bigger than a closet.The job forces her to work long hours, live close by and -- most important -- calm the nerves of white-knuckled students about to whirl themselves and their tall, red-haired instructor into the sky.Her nickname is "Goose."She is Charmienne Hughes, a helicopter flight instructor and owner of Triad Aviation Inc., a one-woman operation that offers aerial photography, surveys and sightseeing from a leased helicopter at the Carroll County Regional Airport.
NEWS
March 4, 1991
Carsten Sierck Brinkmann, a stunt airplane pilot and aerobatics instructor, died of heart failure Friday at his Catonsville home. He was 74.Services for Mr. Brinkmann will be at 1 p.m. tomorrow at the Witzke funeral establishment, 1630 Edmondson Ave. in Catonsville.Born in Baltimore, he attended Catonsville High School. During World War II, he served as a Navy pilot from 1942 to 1946.After the war, he worked in construction before he became a full-time flight instructor -- first independently, and then for Frederick Aviation, an aircraft sales and services company at Frederick Airport.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2012
Herman G. "Hank" Tillman Jr., a retired Air Force colonel and pilot who flew in World War II, Korea and Vietnam and was one of Maryland's most decorated veterans, died Sunday of liver failure at his Chester home. He was 89. He was born in his immigrant grandparents' Anne Arundel County farmhouse, and later moved with his family to a home at Pontiac Avenue and Sixth Street in Brooklyn. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1940, he attended the Johns Hopkins University at night and worked at Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s engineering department during the day. "As a kid, he was fascinated with flying.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | November 18, 2009
Frank A. Sass Jr., a retired Federal Bureau of Investigation special agent supervisor and longtime Monkton resident, died Nov. 3 from complications after cardiac surgery at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 87. He was born and raised in Dubuque, Iowa. After graduating from Dubuque High School in 1940, he began his college studies at the University of Dubuque. He left college in 1942 and joined the Army Air Corps, where he was trained as a flight instructor. Mr. Sass spent the war years instructing pilots and ferrying B-17 Flying Fortresses and other aircraft, some bullet-ridden from combat, to other U.S. air bases.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | October 12, 2006
OAKLAND, Calif. --Oakland Athletics third baseman Eric Chavez was at home preparing for last night's Game 2 of the American League Championship Series when he saw a television report that a private plane had crashed into a 50-story New York apartment building. He dismissed the news as another nameless, faceless tragedy, then he headed to McAfee Coliseum. When he entered the home clubhouse, he learned that the dead pilot was New York Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle, a former Athletics teammate and friend of Chavez's, someone he and his wife often had dinner with in 2001 and 2002.
NEWS
By Melanie Lefkowitz and Melanie Lefkowitz,Newsday | October 12, 2006
NEW YORK -- A single-engine airplane owned by New York Yankees pitcher Cory Lidle sputtered out of the hazy skies and slammed into the side of an exclusive Manhattan apartment tower yesterday, killing Lidle and a flight instructor but miraculously leaving no one in the building seriously hurt. The fiery crash 30 floors above the street sent panicked residents and passers-by running as smoke, fire and aircraft parts rained down to the street. It evoked still-fresh flashbacks to Sept. 11, 2001, and sparked fears of terrorism across the city.
NEWS
By RICHARD A. SERRANO and RICHARD A. SERRANO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 10, 2006
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- He never could fly right. In practice sessions with his instructor, Zacarias Moussaoui couldn't keep the plane level. He was bad at banking, always turning the plane too sharply. When they entered a heavy traffic pattern, he would tense up. He wouldn't focus. His instructors told him that he was a disaster, that he never would fly. And yet when he was arrested by the FBI and suspected of being a terrorist, he grew angry and kept telling the agents over and over to hurry their investigation "because I've got to get back to flight school."
NEWS
January 1, 2006
Nicholas R. "Buddy" Rosewag Jr., a World War II flight instructor and telephone company engineer who became a farmer in middle age to fulfill a lifelong dream, died Dec. 24 at his home outside Ellicott City after a heart attack. He was 84. Born in Arbutus, he grew up in Berwyn and graduated from Hyattsville High School in 1937. Shortly after, he began working for C&P Telephone Co. before joining the Army in 1940. Mr. Rosewag spent nearly three years in the Army Air Forces as a flight instructor, and married Margaret Ann Joyce in 1943 while stationed in Florida.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | October 20, 1993
Bert J. McCausey Jr., a retired Linotype operator, illustrator and writer, died of pneumonia Sept. 26 at the Winchester, Va., Medical Center.The 80-year-old former Brooklyn resident moved to Woodstock, Va., in 1985 after retiring in 1976 from the composing room of The Sun, which he had joined in 1960. He had worked at the News-Post and Baltimore American from 1950 to 1960.He was born in Charleston, Ark., and attended school there. He also attended Oklahoma A&M College and the Maryland Institute of Art.He joined the Marines in 1934 and was a rifle instructor at Parris Island, S.C., with the 5th Marines.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1996
Two years ago, Jim Mathis, an 18-year-old senior at Towson Catholic High School, became the youngest pilot ever to fly solo across the country. But he said his parents didn't let him get into the cockpit until he was old enough to get a pilot's license.The Federal Aviation Administration should be so wise, Mr. Mathis said. The FAA's minimum age for a pilot's license is 16.It might have saved the life of 7-year-old Jessica Dubroff, her father and her flight instructor.Children who are not old enough to drive a car, Mr. Mathis said, should not be allowed to fly an airplane.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
Flying an airplane isn't exactly like driving a car, but it is more similar than you might think. Taking the controls of a Cessna 172 SP - a four-seat, single-engine airplane - in Maryland skies feels pretty familiar, despite the altitude and the speed. The trip was an introductory flight lesson by Freeway Airport near Bowie. For $60, the airport's flight school will tuck a novice pilot (meaning someone with no experience whatsoever) and a friend into a tiny airplane and send them up with a flight instructor for a 30-minute joyride.
NEWS
January 19, 2002
George Welch Lacey III, a pilot and flight instructor, died Jan. 12 in an automobile accident on Route 152 in Fallston when his vehicle was struck by a truck that had crossed the center line. He was 54 and lived in Parkton. He was the owner and operator of Dayflight, a Parkton air-charter service. He also was a certified flight instructor. He had been a special agent for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Baltimore and volunteered in its Bald Eagle Project to protect endangered birds.
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