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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | March 21, 2007
Jack Morrison Goss, a decorated Air Force veteran who flew in World War II and Korea and later served aboard Air Force One during three presidential administrations, died Sunday of heart failure at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The Forest Hill resident was 85. Mr. Goss was born in Bar Harbor, Maine, and raised there and in Washington. "His father was an interior decorator who worked in Bar Harbor for the Rockefellers, Pulitzers and J.P. Morgan," said his daughter, Jacqueline G. Leach of Bel Air. His interest in aviation began as a youngster when his father, a pilot and World War I veteran, took him to an airport to watch planes take off and land.
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NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
In its forced retirement, the Boeing DC-10 sits just off a main runway at BWI Marshall Airport, a grim reminder of the slim margin between a successful landing and a tragic one. Stripped of its logos, engines and usable parts, the wide-body jet - once a chartered troop carrier - now serves as a training platform for firefighters, paramedics and police officers. Rescuers hope that in its second life, the plane can help save human lives. No one died four years ago in the violent landing of World Airways Flight 8535.
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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 15, 1993
Eugene Martin Livermore Jr., 30, a master sergeant in the U.S. Air Force Reserve, Desert Storm veteran and flight instructor for a Frederick company, died Wednesday with a student in a plane crash near Walkersville.At the time of his death, Mr. Livermore was working with student John Francis Joyce, 54, of Rockville, in a single-engine Cessna 152 owned by Control Aero Corp. of Frederick.The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.Mr. Livermore and his wife of five years, the former Debra J. Snyder, had lived in Mount Airy for the last 3 1/2 years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2011
William Clay Pannill, a World War II veteran and retired crane operator who during his 40-year career worked on many significant Baltimore-area construction projects, died Friday of dehydration at Carroll Lutheran Village in Westminster. He was 92. Born in Raccoon Ford, Va., the son of a steam shovel operator and a homemaker, he was raised on the family farm in Culpeper, Va., and was a graduate of public schools. In an unpublished biographical sketch, Mr. Pannill wrote that growing up on a rural farm in Virginia during the Depression of the 1930s was "pretty rough.
NEWS
By Blaine Taylor | November 24, 1990
FIFTY YEARS AGO tomorrow, the very first B-26 Martin Marauder flew its inaugural flight from the field of the Glenn L. Martin Co. at Middle River.According to J. K. Havener, author of the book ''The Martin B-26 Marauder'' and a pilot with 50 B-26 combat missions during World War II, ''From the day of its inception, the plane was a controversial aircraft design. Critics charged that it possessed no margin of safety for crew members and was difficult to fly. Heavily armed and ruggedly built, the Marauder, however, was a fearsome adversary, and actual combat losses to Marauder units were fewer than those suffered by heavy-bomber groups.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2011
William Clay Pannill, a World War II veteran and retired crane operator who during his 40-year career worked on many significant Baltimore-area construction projects, died Friday of dehydration at Carroll Lutheran Village in Westminster. He was 92. Born in Raccoon Ford, Va., the son of a steam shovel operator and a homemaker, he was raised on the family farm in Culpeper, Va., and was a graduate of public schools. In an unpublished biographical sketch, Mr. Pannill wrote that growing up on a rural farm in Virginia during the Depression of the 1930s was "pretty rough.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
In its forced retirement, the Boeing DC-10 sits just off a main runway at BWI Marshall Airport, a grim reminder of the slim margin between a successful landing and a tragic one. Stripped of its logos, engines and usable parts, the wide-body jet - once a chartered troop carrier - now serves as a training platform for firefighters, paramedics and police officers. Rescuers hope that in its second life, the plane can help save human lives. No one died four years ago in the violent landing of World Airways Flight 8535.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1997
About two dozen planes crashed at South Carroll High School yesterday. No one was hurt, if you don't count bruised egos.Northrop Grumman Corp. engineers Peter A. Stenger and Eric Spears spent the day talking to students about what they do for a living, then had students tackle an engineering problem: Design and build a trigger launcher for a foam glider, using only the inexpensive household materials supplied in manila envelope kits.A contest followed to see whose plane went the farthest in a straight path.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 2001
HONOLULU -- "This guy just killed us." That was Lt. Shane Osborn's first thought as the tail of the Chinese F-8 jet fighter sliced into the far left engine of his lumbering Navy surveillance plane two weekends ago, he said yesterday. "The plane just snap-rolled," Osborn said, describing how his huge aircraft heeled more than 130 degrees to the left, nearly turning over, and then plunged 7,500 feet. "I remember looking up and seeing water." He and several members of the Navy crew spoke at a dawn news conference here at Hickam Air Force Base, giving crew members' first public account of the collision.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2001
Investigators said preliminary inspections yesterday revealed no immediate signs of engine failure behind the crash of American Airlines Flight 587, which killed more than 260 people when it dived into a waterfront neighborhood of New York City on Monday morning. After inspecting the engines for cracks, missing pieces and disintegration, National Transportation Safety Board member George Black Jr. said there was "no evidence of any sort of internal failure of the engine. They all seem to be in one piece."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | March 21, 2007
Jack Morrison Goss, a decorated Air Force veteran who flew in World War II and Korea and later served aboard Air Force One during three presidential administrations, died Sunday of heart failure at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The Forest Hill resident was 85. Mr. Goss was born in Bar Harbor, Maine, and raised there and in Washington. "His father was an interior decorator who worked in Bar Harbor for the Rockefellers, Pulitzers and J.P. Morgan," said his daughter, Jacqueline G. Leach of Bel Air. His interest in aviation began as a youngster when his father, a pilot and World War I veteran, took him to an airport to watch planes take off and land.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2001
Investigators said preliminary inspections yesterday revealed no immediate signs of engine failure behind the crash of American Airlines Flight 587, which killed more than 260 people when it dived into a waterfront neighborhood of New York City on Monday morning. After inspecting the engines for cracks, missing pieces and disintegration, National Transportation Safety Board member George Black Jr. said there was "no evidence of any sort of internal failure of the engine. They all seem to be in one piece."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 15, 2001
HONOLULU -- "This guy just killed us." That was Lt. Shane Osborn's first thought as the tail of the Chinese F-8 jet fighter sliced into the far left engine of his lumbering Navy surveillance plane two weekends ago, he said yesterday. "The plane just snap-rolled," Osborn said, describing how his huge aircraft heeled more than 130 degrees to the left, nearly turning over, and then plunged 7,500 feet. "I remember looking up and seeing water." He and several members of the Navy crew spoke at a dawn news conference here at Hickam Air Force Base, giving crew members' first public account of the collision.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | April 22, 1997
About two dozen planes crashed at South Carroll High School yesterday. No one was hurt, if you don't count bruised egos.Northrop Grumman Corp. engineers Peter A. Stenger and Eric Spears spent the day talking to students about what they do for a living, then had students tackle an engineering problem: Design and build a trigger launcher for a foam glider, using only the inexpensive household materials supplied in manila envelope kits.A contest followed to see whose plane went the farthest in a straight path.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 15, 1993
Eugene Martin Livermore Jr., 30, a master sergeant in the U.S. Air Force Reserve, Desert Storm veteran and flight instructor for a Frederick company, died Wednesday with a student in a plane crash near Walkersville.At the time of his death, Mr. Livermore was working with student John Francis Joyce, 54, of Rockville, in a single-engine Cessna 152 owned by Control Aero Corp. of Frederick.The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash.Mr. Livermore and his wife of five years, the former Debra J. Snyder, had lived in Mount Airy for the last 3 1/2 years.
NEWS
By Blaine Taylor | November 24, 1990
FIFTY YEARS AGO tomorrow, the very first B-26 Martin Marauder flew its inaugural flight from the field of the Glenn L. Martin Co. at Middle River.According to J. K. Havener, author of the book ''The Martin B-26 Marauder'' and a pilot with 50 B-26 combat missions during World War II, ''From the day of its inception, the plane was a controversial aircraft design. Critics charged that it possessed no margin of safety for crew members and was difficult to fly. Heavily armed and ruggedly built, the Marauder, however, was a fearsome adversary, and actual combat losses to Marauder units were fewer than those suffered by heavy-bomber groups.
NEWS
May 15, 1996
Rodney D. Koelbel, a Baltimore native and retired Air Force senior master sergeant, died Saturday at a hospital in Pensacola, Fla., of a stroke. He was 50 and lived in Shalimar, Fla.He retired from the Air Force in 1991, ending a 26-year career as a test flight engineer, and joined Crestview Aviation Co. in Pensacola, where he was involved in conversion of the Lockheed Hercules aircraft for industrial use.Services for Mr. Koelbel, a 1963 graduate of St....
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