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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1995
She was supposed to be rubble by now, this once-mighty warship moored at a watery chop shop in South Baltimore.With most of her armored flight deck peeled away, and her weapons and electronics long gone, the USS Coral Sea seems easy prey for torch-wielding workers swarming over the huge gray carcass.But the fighting lady refuses to go quietly, or easily, to her fate: being turned into automobiles, bathroom pipes or microwave ovens."This is not a rusting hulk," says Kerry Ellis, owner of Seawitch Salvage in Fairfield.
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NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2003
ABOARD THE USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Eastern Mediterranean - A breeze is blowing at 3 knots off the port bow, a black-and-yellow screen on the bridge indicates. The aircraft carrier, doing 14 knots in the hazy sea, is positioning itself to launch a wave of 13 fighter jets on a training mission. An officer orders an adjustment in the direction of the aircraft carrier. "Left five degree rudder," he says. "Left five degree rudder, aye, sir," the helmsman replies. Five stories below, on the flight deck, helmeted crews dressed in red, yellow, green and purple shirts are making last-minute checks to the aircraft.
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NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON and GARLAND L. THOMPSON,Garland L. Thompson is an editorial writer for The Sun | May 4, 1991
Jacksonville, Florida. -- Now I know what it feels like to be shot from guns. Here's what it sounds like: ''W-w-w-wree-ee-ee-yyoooush-sh-sh-sh!''Seagoing fighter pilots, bomber crews and submarine hunters hear that sound and feel the giant hand of acceleration mash them into their seats every time they whoosh away from an aircraft carrier.My turn to feel the smash of the catapult came last weekend, during a three-day tour of the USS Forrestal. R.Adm. Walter Davis, former head of the Washington Navy District and now commander, Carrier Group Six, invited several journalists to come see life on a modern warship.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 4, 2001
ABOARD THE USS PELELIU -- Now they were cruising into the wind, four steel gray Harrier jets on the flight deck armed with bombs scrawled with messages such as "Made in USA," work crews arranged in a single file on a steel drag strip, other flight crews and workers perched eight decks high, taking in the scene with videocameras, flashing photos for posterity. Yesterday, after weeks of training and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in near seclusion, the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit came out of the shadows and went publicly to war against terrorism.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 4, 2001
ABOARD THE USS PELELIU -- Now they were cruising into the wind, four steel gray Harrier jets on the flight deck armed with bombs scrawled with messages such as "Made in USA," work crews arranged in a single file on a steel drag strip, other flight crews and workers perched eight decks high, taking in the scene with videocameras, flashing photos for posterity. Yesterday, after weeks of training and supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in near seclusion, the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit came out of the shadows and went publicly to war against terrorism.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 10, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - An aircraft carrier at war is a steel platform for the attack planes that thunder off its flight deck. It is also a floating city with people like Goose from San Diego, who toils in its belly assembling ordnance and says his job is "putting bombs on terrorists' foreheads." In this city, Curt from Cottage Grove, Ore., regulates steam valves that power the launch catapult; he works in a room where the thermometer never dips below 99 degrees. The job of a petty officer from New York is to kneel at the front wheel of a 69,000-pound jet that is revving, screeching and girding for war, to make sure it is hooked into a catapult.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 24, 1999
They grew up in suburban Baltimore and graduated a year apart at the U.S. Naval Academy, two midshipmen enduring a regimented life in the same huge stone dormitory. Now, they are warriors cloistered below deck on an aircraft carrier in the Adriatic Sea.Praying.For Chris and Aaron, fighter-bomber pilots on the carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, their first combat mission began on an early-April night in the closet-sized chaplain's office one level below the flight deck.The senior pilots were the first chosen for combat, launching into the inky blackness and arcing toward targets in Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By Russell Working and Russell Working,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2003
ABOARD THE USS THEODORE ROOSEVELT, Eastern Mediterranean - A breeze is blowing at 3 knots off the port bow, a black-and-yellow screen on the bridge indicates. The aircraft carrier, doing 14 knots in the hazy sea, is positioning itself to launch a wave of 13 fighter jets on a training mission. An officer orders an adjustment in the direction of the aircraft carrier. "Left five degree rudder," he says. "Left five degree rudder, aye, sir," the helmsman replies. Five stories below, on the flight deck, helmeted crews dressed in red, yellow, green and purple shirts are making last-minute checks to the aircraft.
NEWS
By Andrew Zajac and Andrew Zajac,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 2, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The pistol-packing pilot was supposed to be the last line of defense against a terrorist who managed to get into a cockpit. But now, more than two years after Congress sanctioned a training program to deputize aviators and allow them to carry guns in the cockpit, it is believed that only about 5,000 -- a little more than 5 percent of the estimated 95,000 commercial pilots in the country -- are armed while they fly. Pilot advocacy groups...
NEWS
June 9, 2007
James Nicholas Baccala, a retired maintenance worker and Vietnam veteran, died Wednesday of a stroke at his home in Fort Myers, Fla. The former Severna Park resident was 60. Mr. Baccala was born in Baltimore and raised on Exeter Street in Little Italy. He attended Brooklyn Park High School. He enlisted in the Navy in 1964 and served aboard the carrier USS Coral Sea as a member of the ship's flight-deck crew. After returning to Baltimore, he earned his General Educational Development certificate from Anne Arundel Community College.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 10, 2001
ABOARD THE USS CARL VINSON - An aircraft carrier at war is a steel platform for the attack planes that thunder off its flight deck. It is also a floating city with people like Goose from San Diego, who toils in its belly assembling ordnance and says his job is "putting bombs on terrorists' foreheads." In this city, Curt from Cottage Grove, Ore., regulates steam valves that power the launch catapult; he works in a room where the thermometer never dips below 99 degrees. The job of a petty officer from New York is to kneel at the front wheel of a 69,000-pound jet that is revving, screeching and girding for war, to make sure it is hooked into a catapult.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 24, 1999
They grew up in suburban Baltimore and graduated a year apart at the U.S. Naval Academy, two midshipmen enduring a regimented life in the same huge stone dormitory. Now, they are warriors cloistered below deck on an aircraft carrier in the Adriatic Sea.Praying.For Chris and Aaron, fighter-bomber pilots on the carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt, their first combat mission began on an early-April night in the closet-sized chaplain's office one level below the flight deck.The senior pilots were the first chosen for combat, launching into the inky blackness and arcing toward targets in Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1995
She was supposed to be rubble by now, this once-mighty warship moored at a watery chop shop in South Baltimore.With most of her armored flight deck peeled away, and her weapons and electronics long gone, the USS Coral Sea seems easy prey for torch-wielding workers swarming over the huge gray carcass.But the fighting lady refuses to go quietly, or easily, to her fate: being turned into automobiles, bathroom pipes or microwave ovens."This is not a rusting hulk," says Kerry Ellis, owner of Seawitch Salvage in Fairfield.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON and GARLAND L. THOMPSON,Garland L. Thompson is an editorial writer for The Sun | May 4, 1991
Jacksonville, Florida. -- Now I know what it feels like to be shot from guns. Here's what it sounds like: ''W-w-w-wree-ee-ee-yyoooush-sh-sh-sh!''Seagoing fighter pilots, bomber crews and submarine hunters hear that sound and feel the giant hand of acceleration mash them into their seats every time they whoosh away from an aircraft carrier.My turn to feel the smash of the catapult came last weekend, during a three-day tour of the USS Forrestal. R.Adm. Walter Davis, former head of the Washington Navy District and now commander, Carrier Group Six, invited several journalists to come see life on a modern warship.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 23, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Navy has reassigned the first female pilot qualified to fly combat missions from an aircraft carrier because she had problems landing on the ship, Navy officials confirmed yesterday.Lt. Shannon Workman, 28, of Cumberland, Md., has returned to a Navy command in Norfolk, Va., from her assignment as an EA-6B pilot aboard the aircraft carrier Eisenhower in the Adriatic Sea because of performance problems, Cmdr. Stephen Pietropaoli, a Navy spokesman, said.Navy officials were quick to point out that a male pilot in the same EA-6B squadron, Lt. Gerald DiLeonardo, was ordered off the ship for the same reason.
NEWS
By Fred Tannenbaum and Tom Fredrickson and Fred Tannenbaum and Tom Fredrickson,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 9, 2000
NEWPORT NEWS, Va. - The motion alarms on Newport News Shipbuilding's huge gantry crane began blaring their familiar "BEE-OOOH, BEE-OOOH" warning as it set about another chore. Dangling from the crane's tentacles of thick steel cables was another piece of the shipyard's 29th aircraft carrier, the Ronald Reagan, named for the former president. It was a preassembled rectangular section of the flight deck, with a V-shaped channel called a "cat trough." The German-made gantry, fittingly called Goliath and one of the world's largest, gingerly carried the section to another part where helmeted workers waited to apply finishing touches before it was to be added to the ship.
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