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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
A fighter jet that crashed off Chincoteague Island in Virginia this month was recovered in pieces from more than 100 feet below the ocean's surface during a 15-day salvage operation that ended this week, according to the Navy. Among the salvaged wreckage was the jet's flight data recorder, which could reveal more information on how the aircraft went down. The D.C. Air National Guard pilot of the F-16C Falcon, based out of Joint Base Andrews in Prince George's County, survived the accident after ejecting and being rescued by the Coast Guard.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Nearly a month after Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 vanished, a team of Maryland engineers detected the pings from a flight data recorder that narrowed the search area to a more manageable yet still vast swath of the Indian Ocean. Working from an Australian warship involved in the search, a crew of nine from Phoenix International in Prince George's County deployed a U.S. Navy listening device to the depths of the ocean in the hunt for a signal from the doomed jetliner's black box. Tapped by the Navy to assist Malaysian, Chinese and Australian officials in the search, the team and their equipment had flown from an office and warehouse in Largo nearly two weeks earlier.
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NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2001
Investigators said preliminary inspections yesterday revealed no immediate signs of engine failure behind the crash of American Airlines Flight 587, which killed more than 260 people when it dived into a waterfront neighborhood of New York City on Monday morning. After inspecting the engines for cracks, missing pieces and disintegration, National Transportation Safety Board member George Black Jr. said there was "no evidence of any sort of internal failure of the engine. They all seem to be in one piece."
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
A fighter jet that crashed off Chincoteague Island in Virginia this month was recovered in pieces from more than 100 feet below the ocean's surface during a 15-day salvage operation that ended this week, according to the Navy. Among the salvaged wreckage was the jet's flight data recorder, which could reveal more information on how the aircraft went down. The D.C. Air National Guard pilot of the F-16C Falcon, based out of Joint Base Andrews in Prince George's County, survived the accident after ejecting and being rescued by the Coast Guard.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 3, 1994
MERRILLVILLE, Ind. -- The American Eagle plane that crashed Monday night took an unexplained dip to the right, recovered, dipped again and turned upside down just before it plunged to the ground, killing all 68 people aboard, the chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said at a briefing last night.Data from the cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorder from Flight 4184 showed that the plane began descending probably in response to instruction radioed to the pilots from the ground.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 1999
Navy searchers said yesterday that they had definitively determined the location of the flight data recorder and the cockpit voice recorder from EgyptAir Flight 990.The discovery is essential in learning why the Boeing 767 plummeted into the Atlantic Ocean off New England early Sunday, killing all 217 people aboard.Investigators provided further details last night about the aircraft's final moments. Once something went wrong, they said, the twin-engine jet began a tortured and ever-faster descent that exceeded 660 mph. Radar sweeps tracking the aircraft's plunge from Nantucket Island show that in the last 37 seconds of its flight, the plane twisted away from its assigned northeast heading in a long, right-hand turn.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 14, 1996
MIAMI -- Recovery teams scored a success in their struggle against the Everglades yesterday, pulling from the mire the flight data recorder of ValuJet Flight 592, which crashed and disappeared into the marsh Saturday.Evidence was mounting that the DC-9 disintegrated as it plunged nose first into the ground. Investigators said the plane apparently fell 7,500 feet in its last 40 seconds.In the third day of the search, workers found no sizable pieces of the fuselage. Instead, crews found only small parts of the bodies of the 109 people who died -- but not an identifiable victim.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Nearly a month after Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 vanished, a team of Maryland engineers detected the pings from a flight data recorder that narrowed the search area to a more manageable yet still vast swath of the Indian Ocean. Working from an Australian warship involved in the search, a crew of nine from Phoenix International in Prince George's County deployed a U.S. Navy listening device to the depths of the ocean in the hunt for a signal from the doomed jetliner's black box. Tapped by the Navy to assist Malaysian, Chinese and Australian officials in the search, the team and their equipment had flown from an office and warehouse in Largo nearly two weeks earlier.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | November 20, 2000
SEATTLE - Federal investigators now believe a critical part of Alaska Airlines Flight 261's tail-control mechanism broke off in flight, making it impossible to pull the jet out of its sudden, fatal dive. The Boeing MD-80, en route from Puerto Vallarta, Mexico, to San Francisco and then Seattle, crashed into the Pacific Ocean in January, killing all 88 aboard. Analyzing information from the jet's flight data recorder, a National Transportation Safety Board investigator has found that the only way Flight 261 could have tumbled into its final dive was if a part called the end stop - intended as a fail-safe device to keep the plane's horizontal stabilizer intact - broke off in flight.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 27, 1996
SMITHTOWN, N.Y. -- Radar records show that TWA Flight 800 apparently continued to fly for at least 24 seconds after the cataclysmic event that doomed it, raising the possibility that some of the passengers and crew may have been alive in the last horrifying seconds before the crippled jet broke apart in a fireball, investigators said yesterday.The radar information does not give a clue as to whether the cockpit crew had any functioning controls to work with after the plane was disabled at 13,700 feet by either a mechanical problem, a bomb or a missile -- investigators still do not know which.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2001
Investigators said preliminary inspections yesterday revealed no immediate signs of engine failure behind the crash of American Airlines Flight 587, which killed more than 260 people when it dived into a waterfront neighborhood of New York City on Monday morning. After inspecting the engines for cracks, missing pieces and disintegration, National Transportation Safety Board member George Black Jr. said there was "no evidence of any sort of internal failure of the engine. They all seem to be in one piece."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 1999
Navy searchers said yesterday that they had definitively determined the location of the flight data recorder and the cockpit voice recorder from EgyptAir Flight 990.The discovery is essential in learning why the Boeing 767 plummeted into the Atlantic Ocean off New England early Sunday, killing all 217 people aboard.Investigators provided further details last night about the aircraft's final moments. Once something went wrong, they said, the twin-engine jet began a tortured and ever-faster descent that exceeded 660 mph. Radar sweeps tracking the aircraft's plunge from Nantucket Island show that in the last 37 seconds of its flight, the plane twisted away from its assigned northeast heading in a long, right-hand turn.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 14, 1996
MIAMI -- Recovery teams scored a success in their struggle against the Everglades yesterday, pulling from the mire the flight data recorder of ValuJet Flight 592, which crashed and disappeared into the marsh Saturday.Evidence was mounting that the DC-9 disintegrated as it plunged nose first into the ground. Investigators said the plane apparently fell 7,500 feet in its last 40 seconds.In the third day of the search, workers found no sizable pieces of the fuselage. Instead, crews found only small parts of the bodies of the 109 people who died -- but not an identifiable victim.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 3, 1994
MERRILLVILLE, Ind. -- The American Eagle plane that crashed Monday night took an unexplained dip to the right, recovered, dipped again and turned upside down just before it plunged to the ground, killing all 68 people aboard, the chairman of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said at a briefing last night.Data from the cockpit voice recorder and the flight data recorder from Flight 4184 showed that the plane began descending probably in response to instruction radioed to the pilots from the ground.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 23, 1995
As federal investigators convene a weeklong hearing in Pittsburgh today, they have little progress to report on the crash of USAir Flight 427 in September.After five months of investigating a plane crash, the National Transportation Safety Board usually comes up with something telling.That hasn't happened in the case of the Sept. 28 crash.The Boeing 737 jetliner rolled suddenly to the left and plunged 5,000 feet to the ground as it approached Pittsburgh International Airport, killing all 132 people on board.
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