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Flight 93

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By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2005
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - Johncie and Ronald Guerin have just driven five hours from their home in Charleston, W.Va. They've come to place two lawn ornament angels here at the site dedicated to the memory of the 40 passengers and crew members of United Airlines Flight 93 who died Sept. 11, 2001, when their hijacked jet slammed into the ground. One of their angels stands upright. The other is prone and oozes what looks like water. "I don't know where the moisture came from," Johncie, 56, says in a gravelly voice.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | July 6, 2008
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - I made my long-delayed Flight 93 pilgrimage a week before July 4 this year. This is where the United Airlines plane crashed on 9/11. It's the final resting place of 40 passengers and crew, some of whom apparently overwhelmed a group of terrorists - in all likelihood saving lives and national treasure in Washington, D.C., the terrorists' target destination. I've always marveled at the story: the image of ordinary people accepting what surely they feared would be a fatal challenge.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | July 6, 2008
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - I made my long-delayed Flight 93 pilgrimage a week before July 4 this year. This is where the United Airlines plane crashed on 9/11. It's the final resting place of 40 passengers and crew, some of whom apparently overwhelmed a group of terrorists - in all likelihood saving lives and national treasure in Washington, D.C., the terrorists' target destination. I've always marveled at the story: the image of ordinary people accepting what surely they feared would be a fatal challenge.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Paul Greengrass, the British writer-director of the excitingly intelligent big-screen docudrama United 93, looks and sounds like a campus star from 35 years ago. He's got the shaggy hair, the furry, resonant voice and the Russian-revolutionary spectacles, and he cuts the right profile, tall and shambling yet also broad-shouldered and sturdy. He combines inner fire with lucidity and an air of ongoing challenge, like a guest speaker who'd fill a hall and leave his crowds stomping for more.
NEWS
By RICHARD A. SERRANO and RICHARD A. SERRANO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 13, 2006
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- The government completed its case against Zacarias Moussaoui yesterday with its most chilling piece of evidence, a tape from the cockpit of United Airlines Flight 93 that recorded the terrorists overwhelming the pilots on Sept. 11, 2001, slashing their throats and praising Allah before crashing the jet into a Pennsylvania field. The 32-minute recording begins at 9:31 a.m. with terrorists forcing the two pilots at knifepoint to give up control of the aircraft. Apparently dragged outside the cockpit, the pilots can be heard begging for their lives.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
Kenny Nacke never planned to run in today's New York City Marathon, but fate intervened. Nacke's brother Louis, who was known as Joey to his family, was on United Airlines Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001, when it went down near Shanksville, Pa. Now Nacke, and 17 others who had family on that flight, have joined together to become "The Family Runners." They have trained for seven months and will run this marathon in tribute to the ones they lost. "Anything I can do to keep his memory alive for his sons and my children, I'll do," said Nacke, who lives in Dundalk and is an officer with the Baltimore County Police Department's K-9 unit.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 24, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Paul Greengrass, the British writer-director of the excitingly intelligent big-screen docudrama United 93, looks and sounds like a campus star from 35 years ago. He's got the shaggy hair, the furry, resonant voice and the Russian-revolutionary spectacles, and he cuts the right profile, tall and shambling yet also broad-shouldered and sturdy. He combines inner fire with lucidity and an air of ongoing challenge, like a guest speaker who'd fill a hall and leave his crowds stomping for more.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - The FBI held back its agents in August from opening a criminal investigation of a man who investigators now suspect was meant to be the 20th hijacker in the Sept. 11 attacks, a senior Justice Department official said yesterday. Zacarias Moussaoui, 33, a French citizen of Moroccan descent, was arrested Aug. 17 on immigration charges after he tried to learn how to fly large jet aircraft, but expressed no interest in mastering how to take off or land. Senior officials at FBI headquarters rejected requests from agents in Minneapolis for a wider investigation on two occasions, even after a French intelligence agency warned the bureau in a classified two-page cable Aug. 27 that Moussaoui held "Islamic extremist beliefs."
NEWS
By ARTHUR HIRSCH and ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
For all their horror, the images of Sept. 11, 2001, give at least some distance, taken as they were from the ground looking up at the smoldering towers, from across the Hudson, from too far away to look into the faces of those enduring unimaginable suffering. The recorded voices, however, are all in close-up. The strangeness of that day has faded and once-shocking photographs have grown familiar, but these voices on tape, these words in transcripts take us to places where the cameras never went.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin, Childs Walker and Alec MacGillis and Jennifer McMenamin, Childs Walker and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - A United Airlines 757 carrying 45 people crashed in a grassy field yesterday morning - moments after a 911 caller on the jet told a local emergency dispatcher, "We are being hijacked! We are being hijacked!" Flight 93 was en route from Newark, N.J., to San Francisco when it went down about 10 a.m. near an overgrown strip mine about 35 miles from the Maryland line. Pennsylvania state police said they did not expect to find any survivors. The jet was the last hijacked plane to crash in yesterday's horrific assault on U.S. targets.
NEWS
By RICHARD A. SERRANO and RICHARD A. SERRANO,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 13, 2006
ALEXANDRIA, Va. -- The government completed its case against Zacarias Moussaoui yesterday with its most chilling piece of evidence, a tape from the cockpit of United Airlines Flight 93 that recorded the terrorists overwhelming the pilots on Sept. 11, 2001, slashing their throats and praising Allah before crashing the jet into a Pennsylvania field. The 32-minute recording begins at 9:31 a.m. with terrorists forcing the two pilots at knifepoint to give up control of the aircraft. Apparently dragged outside the cockpit, the pilots can be heard begging for their lives.
NEWS
By ARTHUR HIRSCH and ARTHUR HIRSCH,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
For all their horror, the images of Sept. 11, 2001, give at least some distance, taken as they were from the ground looking up at the smoldering towers, from across the Hudson, from too far away to look into the faces of those enduring unimaginable suffering. The recorded voices, however, are all in close-up. The strangeness of that day has faded and once-shocking photographs have grown familiar, but these voices on tape, these words in transcripts take us to places where the cameras never went.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2005
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - Johncie and Ronald Guerin have just driven five hours from their home in Charleston, W.Va. They've come to place two lawn ornament angels here at the site dedicated to the memory of the 40 passengers and crew members of United Airlines Flight 93 who died Sept. 11, 2001, when their hijacked jet slammed into the ground. One of their angels stands upright. The other is prone and oozes what looks like water. "I don't know where the moisture came from," Johncie, 56, says in a gravelly voice.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
Kenny Nacke never planned to run in today's New York City Marathon, but fate intervened. Nacke's brother Louis, who was known as Joey to his family, was on United Airlines Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001, when it went down near Shanksville, Pa. Now Nacke, and 17 others who had family on that flight, have joined together to become "The Family Runners." They have trained for seven months and will run this marathon in tribute to the ones they lost. "Anything I can do to keep his memory alive for his sons and my children, I'll do," said Nacke, who lives in Dundalk and is an officer with the Baltimore County Police Department's K-9 unit.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 5, 2002
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. -- Until yesterday there had never been a Fourth of July parade in this borough of 245 people, a self-proclaimed "Friendly Little Town" where Main Street seems a generous name for a road with just one store. But, then, there had never been so much to celebrate. That, by and large, was the sentiment in this once-anonymous place just over the hill from the spot where an airplane hijacked by terrorists -- United Airlines Flight 93 -- smashed into a field on the morning of Sept.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
The buses carrying mourners rolled slowly into town and the people of Shanksville looked up at the windows, at the siblings and children and parents and spouses of the passengers who'd died in the crash of Flight 93. Through tinted glass the families looked back at them, and some of the townspeople wondered what to do, whether to wave or flash peace signs, salute or stand still. Some even talked about it: Would waving be inappropriate? Did a hand over the heart say enough? What gesture conveyed grief and showed gratitude and provided comfort all at once?
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
The buses carrying mourners rolled slowly into town and the people of Shanksville looked up at the windows, at the siblings and children and parents and spouses of the passengers who'd died in the crash of Flight 93. Through tinted glass the families looked back at them, and some of the townspeople wondered what to do, whether to wave or flash peace signs, salute or stand still. Some even talked about it: Would waving be inappropriate? Did a hand over the heart say enough? What gesture conveyed grief and showed gratitude and provided comfort all at once?
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 5, 2002
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. -- Until yesterday there had never been a Fourth of July parade in this borough of 245 people, a self-proclaimed "Friendly Little Town" where Main Street seems a generous name for a road with just one store. But, then, there had never been so much to celebrate. That, by and large, was the sentiment in this once-anonymous place just over the hill from the spot where an airplane hijacked by terrorists -- United Airlines Flight 93 -- smashed into a field on the morning of Sept.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - The FBI held back its agents in August from opening a criminal investigation of a man who investigators now suspect was meant to be the 20th hijacker in the Sept. 11 attacks, a senior Justice Department official said yesterday. Zacarias Moussaoui, 33, a French citizen of Moroccan descent, was arrested Aug. 17 on immigration charges after he tried to learn how to fly large jet aircraft, but expressed no interest in mastering how to take off or land. Senior officials at FBI headquarters rejected requests from agents in Minneapolis for a wider investigation on two occasions, even after a French intelligence agency warned the bureau in a classified two-page cable Aug. 27 that Moussaoui held "Islamic extremist beliefs."
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin, Childs Walker and Alec MacGillis and Jennifer McMenamin, Childs Walker and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2001
SHANKSVILLE, Pa. - A United Airlines 757 carrying 45 people crashed in a grassy field yesterday morning - moments after a 911 caller on the jet told a local emergency dispatcher, "We are being hijacked! We are being hijacked!" Flight 93 was en route from Newark, N.J., to San Francisco when it went down about 10 a.m. near an overgrown strip mine about 35 miles from the Maryland line. Pennsylvania state police said they did not expect to find any survivors. The jet was the last hijacked plane to crash in yesterday's horrific assault on U.S. targets.
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