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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2011
Employees at Carefirst BlueCross BlueShield, the region's largest insurer, can work from home several days a week. Hunt Valley-based McCormick & Co. lets some full-time spice plant employees work four-day weeks. And in the "flexible workplace" of Harris-Kupfer Architects in Baltimore, employees' kids can tag along to the office, where they curl up on the lounge couch to play video games on snow days. However they define it, more companies in Maryland and beyond have adopted flexible workplace policies.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Note to Brian Matusz and T.J. McFarland: It's not personal. The Orioles released their roster for the American League Division Series on Thursday morning and a couple of the team's left-handed mainstays are going to spend the next several days in a cheerleading role. That's not because of anything they did or didn't do during the regular season. It's because the Detroit Tigers are such a heavily right-handed-hitting team that there won't be very many opportunities for manager Buck Showalter to match up using his lefties in the middle and late innings.
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NEWS
February 17, 2005
THE NEW secretary of education, Margaret Spellings, is sending some welcome signals that her department may take a more pragmatic approach than that of her predecessor in implementing the No Child Left Behind law. In some recent appearances and interviews, Ms. Spellings has let it be known that states seeking at least some flexibility in the onerous law may find more sympathy at the department, instead of having to complain to Congress. She's not flinching on NCLB's core strategy of annual assessments, but Ms. Spellings is right to try to work with states to iron out differences.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Tina Bahadori says a career at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has given her the chance to achieve something that 25 years in the private sector didn't offer: a legacy. Bahadori's years working for consulting, advocacy and lobbying firms brought her success and money. But as national program director for the EPA's chemical safety and sustainability research, she says, she's effecting change. "There is nothing more rewarding and legacy-building as a scientist who works in the environmental and public health arena," said Bahadori, a chemical and combustion engineer with degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
When city or county firefighters have a family event or unexpected obligation pop up on a workday, their solution is familiar to most shift workers: They find a colleague willing to trade hours. But for the roughly 10,000 firefighters employed by the federal government at places such as the Naval Academy and Fort Meade, law limits the ability to swap shifts — a restriction that they say causes them to miss birthdays, graduations and personal emergencies. And so the small federal firefighting force — including about 350 in the Baltimore-Washington region — is again pushing Congress to grant them the same flexibility to alter schedules that their local counterparts have had for decades under the Fair Labor Standards Act. "There are things you miss, like when your child has a play, or some sort of activity," said Trenton Massenberg, 47, a fire captain at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | January 31, 2007
As much as we want flexibility in our jobs, we seem to be burdened by our doubts. Would I appear less committed? How would it affect my career? What would my colleagues think? Such ambiguity continues to exist even though many companies allow employees to work flexible hours, telecommute and take an extended break to raise children or take care of other personal business. This perk is considered one way to attract and retain the best people. A new survey shows the dilemma many workers face.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,United Feature Syndicate/Contributing Writer | October 6, 1992
Greater flexibility can enhance your overall athletic performance.Longer muscles -- a sign of flexibility -- can generate greater force on a joint. As a result, you can throw farther, lift heavier, jump higher and run faster. The best way to improve your flexibility is through slow, deliberate stretching movements that increase your range of motion.Rapid or bouncy stretching can be dangerous; it places too much tension on the muscle being stretched. It's also usually ineffective because it triggers the involuntary stretch reflex, which contracts the very muscle you are trying to relax.
FEATURES
By Deborah L. Jacobs and Deborah L. Jacobs,CHRONICLE FEATURES | April 21, 1996
Take Our Daughters to Work Day, coming up on April 25, gives lots of folks the warm fuzzies. This annual event, which the Ms. Foundation for Women started in 1993, shows little girls that their parents have a life outside the house. Ideally, kids will get the message that they, too, can have a working life someday.Trouble is, the well-meaning occasion turns many offices into playgrounds and sidesteps a serious question: How can people who are going through so much career upheaval themselves teach their daughters -- and sons -- workplace survival?
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | May 10, 1996
Recognizing what it called Maryland's commitment to dTC education reform, the federal government yesterday snipped away some of the red tape surrounding state schools' use of $150 million in annual aid from Washington.The U.S. Department of Education made Maryland one of only seven states able to waive regulations governing a portion of federal aid, giving the state more flexibility in spending."Maryland has demonstrated its commitment to promoting flexibility, accountability and effective innovation in order to improve teaching and learning," said Secretary of Education Richard W. Riley in a letter announcing the designation to state Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau | March 23, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The White House task force on health care reform has decided to give states broad flexibility in carrying out reforms, an approach that could create a patchwork of different systems for controlling costs and stimulating competition, sources said yesterday."
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Going over the list of the nearly 60 players who will be in Sarasota, Fla., when major league spring training opens for the Orioles next week and trying to project the club's 25-man roster for Opening Day is a tough task. However, there are roughly 13 "locks" for the Opening Day roster. After that, there are about six players who have a better chance to make the team than not. That doesn't leave much room for everyone else, and it'd be best for two newcomers who are competing for roster spots to show they can play multiple positions in order to have a chance to crack the Opening Day roster.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Maryland's largest state workers union will ask the General Assembly to undo a Court of Appeals ruling that would erode traditional seniority protections for thousands of public employees. The state's highest court held last week that when jobs reopen after layoffs, agencies are not required to offer the positions to previous employees in order of seniority. Instead, the court said, agencies have the option of following seniority rules or recruiting employees. Sue Esty, legislative affairs director for Council 3 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, said Monday that the union will seek a legislative remedy to that decision.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | October 31, 2013
Workers may no longer have to rush to stock up on medications or glasses just to use up money in flexible spending accounts before the end of the year.  For years, any money left over in a flexible spending account has been forfeited.   The U.S. Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service announced Thursday a modification of the so-called “use-it-or-lose-it” rule. Employees now will be able to carry over as much as $500 in the account into the next year. Employers, though, have to adopt this change.
NEWS
By Deborah Agus | August 14, 2013
It is mid-morning on a recent Friday in West Baltimore, and there is a long line snaking down the street and around the corner. Why? Vendors are dispensing free heroin samples. In other areas of the city, buyers are risking arrest and drug contamination to illegally purchase buprenorphine. It is legal medication when given with a prescription. It is used to treat opioid addiction and facilitate recovery. So why buy it illegally? Not to get high as a substitute for heroin. They are using it to treat their heroin addiction.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Technology company Hope LoanPort could have signed a conventional lease for its new headquarters in Baltimore. But the nonprofit doesn't work in a conventional way. Its 10 employees live in three states. Some work at home part-time but need office space to meet with clients or review documents. Sometimes a few employees need to meet in an office to work on a presentation. And the company's growth makes it difficult to gauge when it will need more space or how much more. Hope chose a relatively new but growing option, a "flexible workplace" center.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2013
Five air traffic control towers in Maryland that had been scheduled to shut down in June as a result of federal budget cuts are now expected to remain open, lawmakers said Wednesday — easing fears that the closures could back up flights at BWI Marshall Airport. A provision tucked into a high-profile bill approved by Congress last week to end furloughs of air traffic controllers — and the flight delays they caused — also leaves more than $30 million available for towers at 149 small airports nationwide, lawmakers said.
BUSINESS
By Barbara Rose and Barbara Rose,Chicago Tribune | March 14, 2007
A year ago when employees at Citigroup Inc.'s South Dakota credit-card center were offered a chance to pick schedules that better fit their lives, Deb Qualseth jumped at the opportunity to work 10-hour days and take Fridays off. "It helps you juggle what happens outside this place," said the billing-dispute specialist. "It's made a huge difference." Historically, only a handful of professionals enjoyed control over when or where they worked. But some companies, including Citigroup, are offering greater flexibility to hourly workers with traditionally rigid schedules as a way to reduce turnover, increase efficiency or compete in tighter labor markets.
NEWS
By Jon Marino and Duke Helfand and Jon Marino and Duke Helfand,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 20, 2004
WASHINGTON - Schools will gain flexibility in measuring the progress of students with limited English skills through two policy changes announced yesterday by the U.S. Department of Education. The revisions mean that many U.S. school districts might find it easier to meet their yearly progress goals and avoid penalties imposed by the No Child Left Behind Act, federal education officials said. About 5.5 million public school students are enrolled in programs teaching English as a second language.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | April 27, 2013
The Ravens did us beat reporters a minor disservice on Saturday afternoon, drafting Harvard fullback Kyle Juszczyk, whose surname will leave behind many red squiggly lines as we learn to spell it, in the fourth round. It's too soon to say that this did a disservice to Pro Bowl fullback Vonta Leach, whose future could be in doubt . “I couldn't ask for a better mentor,” Juszczyk said Saturday. “I think he's been the best fullback in the league.” As we have seen for two years, Leach is probably the best blocking fullback in the NFL, and he has the dented facemasks to prove it. But Juszczyk appears to be a better fit for the future as the Ravens, with quarterback Joe Flacco, continue to modernize their offense.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
When city or county firefighters have a family event or unexpected obligation pop up on a workday, their solution is familiar to most shift workers: They find a colleague willing to trade hours. But for the roughly 10,000 firefighters employed by the federal government at places such as the Naval Academy and Fort Meade, law limits the ability to swap shifts — a restriction that they say causes them to miss birthdays, graduations and personal emergencies. And so the small federal firefighting force — including about 350 in the Baltimore-Washington region — is again pushing Congress to grant them the same flexibility to alter schedules that their local counterparts have had for decades under the Fair Labor Standards Act. "There are things you miss, like when your child has a play, or some sort of activity," said Trenton Massenberg, 47, a fire captain at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda.
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