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ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | February 29, 2012
Following Rye and Bond Street Social, another new bar is coming to Fells Point. To be called Frederick's on Fleet Street, the bar replaces Tyson's Tavern, which closed last year. The general manager and part-owner is Jim Saufley, a longtime bartender and part-time boxing coach.  The anticipated opening date is April 1. Like Rye, Frederick's will focus on craft cocktails - originals by Saufley and his own take on vintage cocktails. Saufley has been a corporate bartender, for Marriott hotels, for 18 years and is a member of the new Baltimore Bartenders' Guild . He and his business partner, Eric Butterfield, have been renovating the small bar - it holds about 100 people - since last October, when they bought the business.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 3, 2014
The article "City, county agree to help pay for Red Line as cost rises to $2.9 billion" (Aug. 26) was disturbing. As one who was born and raised in the area, I remember well the many trains moving along Fleet Street and Aliceanna Streets when automobile traffic (crossing both north and south) would come to a complete halt. While waiting for the box cars to pass, there were times they would then be reversed in moving - thereby doubling your wait time to cross. Many houses on both sides of the streets took the brunt from the heavy trains causing them to vibrate and shake.
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NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,[sun reporter] | October 15, 2006
WONDERING IF YOU WERE GLIMPSED? / / Check out baltimoresun.com / glimpsed for additional photos of fashion-forward locals and a critique by fashion writer Tanika White of the styles she saw around town.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
If you're a fan of The Quest Bar on Fleet Street in East Baltimore, the good news is there's a big party there this Saturday. The bad news is the party is a last hurrah. After nearly 15 years, bar owner Tom Mathison is selling his longtime Highlandtown establishment -- perhaps the last true gay bar on the east side -- to developers, who plan to tear the tavern down and put in townhomes, he said Thursday. "It's just bittersweet when you've done something half your life, seeing it end," said Mathison, 66, who spent years tending bars on Boston Street and in Fells Point before starting Quest.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | January 13, 1992
LONDON -- The street is rich in splendid clocks that overhang the sidewalks and ornament abandoned newspaper palaces, water stained, and here and there streaked by pigeon dung.The clocks tick on, not always in tune with one another.The ghosts of all the past contributors to the legend of Fleet Street lurk in the courts and alleys that run into the main artery like tributaries to the greater stream. They are cold presences, these ghosts, in offices now held by correspondents for foreign and provincial journals, by accountants, by lawyers and their callow clerks, or by others who do prosaic but important work.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
As hobbies go, privy hunting is not pretty. It's not like, say, remodeling a '55 Chevy. It takes a different searching soul to dedicate months to digging 8 feet down into century-old outhouses in search of ... what? And do we really want to unearth what is buried in those old pits? These aren't ancient art galleries, after all. Introducing Spencer Henderson, Baltimore privy hunter, different soul. Equipped with a rake and shovel, sensible work clothes, a "Police K-9" visor and a vibrant mustache, the 55-year-old Henderson spent his summer in the trenches of Fells Point.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | August 9, 1991
LONDON -- The bells of St. Bride's in Fleet Street rang joyously through the afternoon in celebration of the release yesterday of one of Fleet Street's own -- British television newsman John McCarthy.A visiting American chaplain at St. Bride's, the Rev. Holt Souder, led a thanksgiving service for about 1,000 people crowded into the 1,400-year-old "journalists' church," just off the street that runs through what was once the heart of London's newspaper world.With a huge picture of Mr. McCarthy displayed on the main aisle, the priest told of the phone call received in the church that morning: "The rumor was a fact.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1995
They're not saying "Doggone it" on Fleet Street anymore. Missing for several years, an offbeat Baltimore landmark that was the inspiration for a John Waters movie set is slowly returning to the red brick walls of the Luc his grooming and supply store in Highlandtown for nearly two decades.Soon, there will be a dozing dog. A Miss America dog. An aerobics dog. And if the years of auditioning hundreds of artists pays off, there may even be a Marilyn Monroe dog sashaying in the middle of Fleet Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MARC SHAPIRO and MARC SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | June 15, 2006
There's a little block just outside of the heart of Fells Point that may be somewhat overlooked. Since the 1900 block of Fleet St. is on the outskirts of the more happening area, businesses there have put together an event to turn some heads. Called the Fleet Street Fling, it runs all day Saturday. "It's just a nice little thing that brings the community together and gives us a chance to showcase our street," says Tom Rivers, one of the organizers of the event and the owner of restaurant and bar Ale Mary's.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2000
Fidelity & Guaranty Life Insurance officials said yesterday that they plan to tap state tax credits available to businesses that stay in the city and move to a new office tower under construction in Inner Harbor East. F&G Life has outgrown its space and plans to move its 165 employees by December to leased space in the Fleet Street building being developed by H&S Properties Development Co. It will take two of the building's six floors, or 56,000 square feet, which doubles its current space.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Walter T. "Lucky" Stankowski, the retired owner of a Fells Point tavern and package-goods store known for its Saturday afternoon music-making sessions, died of cancer June 17 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Highlandtown resident was 89. Born in Baltimore on Eastern Avenue, he was the son of Walter Stankowski, who owned a family bar, and the former Vera Litwinski, a homemaker. "He got the name Lucky because when he got into little situations, he would always get out," said his daughter, Margaret Harrison of Ocean City . Mr. Stankowski attended St. Stanislaus School and was a 1943 graduate of Patterson Park High School.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
Nearly two decades ago, Rob Coyle helped his friend Rich Mackey open an Irish pub in Washington. It went well - Mackey's Public House is still open on L Street - and the two friends agreed, back then, to open another bar should they ever get the chance. The right opportunity finally came, 18 years later, when the Canton corner bar Geckos closed last year. In October, renovations began to turn the old Geckos into Fleet Street Tavern. It was not a complete gutting, Coyle said, but it needed the upkeep.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
At some point after it opened in the fall of 2012, Harbor East's Fleet Street Kitchen realized its necktie was pulled a bit too tight. The stylish farm-to-table restaurant with the four-course tasting menu had earned a flattering reputation for its food, but it was not a place to stop in on a whim for a drink. Enter The Tavern Room, the more casual side of Fleet Street Kitchen that debuted at the beginning of this month. Instead of completely breaking down the sophisticated environment they had cultivated, owners the Bagby Restaurant Group split the room in half, leaving the upper dining room the same, while attempting to make the front area more approachable.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
Fleet Street Kitchen will soon split in half. The back, or upper dining room, will remain its stylish, comfortably formal self. But beginning March 1, the restaurant's front dining area will become The Tavern Room, a more casual space (think, no white tablecloths) with its own more-casual menu. Dave Seel, the director of marketing for the Baltimore-based Bagby Restaurant Group, whose other restaurants include Ten Ten American Bistro, Bagby Pizza and Cunningham's, said that the addition of a casual concept at Fleet Street Kitchen, which opened in the fall of 2012, was not a reaction to increased competition in Harbor East.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
The Fells Point Fun Festival will bring road closures to the neighborhood this weekend, according to the Baltimore Department of Transportation. Beginning at 5 p.m. Friday, Broadway will be closed to through traffic between Eastern Avenue and Fleet Street. Beginning at 6 a.m. Saturday, Broadway will be closed to all motorists from Eastern Avenue to Thames Street. In addition, every street below Aliceanna Street and between Wolfe and Caroline streets will be closed. All the roads will reopen by 6 a.m. Monday.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Imagine a Baltimore rowhouse so deep that it sits on two parallel streets and, consequently, has two addresses. Mike and Matt Knoepfle, brothers and partners in Building Character, a firm that renovates city houses, have taken on their largest project to date at 2110 Cambridge St. and 2117 Fleet St. The 3,600-square-foot Canton property with five bedrooms, four bathrooms and plenty of entertaining space on multiple levels has an asking price of...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2014
Walter T. "Lucky" Stankowski, the retired owner of a Fells Point tavern and package-goods store known for its Saturday afternoon music-making sessions, died of cancer June 17 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Highlandtown resident was 89. Born in Baltimore on Eastern Avenue, he was the son of Walter Stankowski, who owned a family bar, and the former Vera Litwinski, a homemaker. "He got the name Lucky because when he got into little situations, he would always get out," said his daughter, Margaret Harrison of Ocean City . Mr. Stankowski attended St. Stanislaus School and was a 1943 graduate of Patterson Park High School.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | April 24, 2008
Standing over one of the Colonial, brick sidewalks that help define Annapolis, the archaeologists began digging with trowels and shovels. The team from the University of Maryland carved a 4-foot-long trench along a sidewalk at Fleet and Cornhill streets - two of the oldest in the historic district. Bagging and tagging artifacts along the way, they scraped through the powdered remains of a red brick sidewalk from 1820 and a black layer of wood chips from 1740. Then they found something far more significant than the shards of pearlware, animal bones and the King George III penny that they uncovered in the layers above: a log street that archaeologists called the oldest remnant yet discovered of the Annapolis settlement.
NEWS
September 6, 2013
As Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announce $1.5 billion in new transportation projects, the Red Line most costly among them, The Sun should call attention to serious concerns raised by state Sen. Bill Ferguson and Dels. Peter A. Hammen, Luke H. Clippinger and Brian K. McHale ("Transportation projects funded," Sept. 4). Many city-dwellers, myself included, have lamented Baltimore's mass transit deficiencies for decades. But some of us can also recall the repeated struggles - dating back at least to the legend-worthy 1970s fight Barbara Mikulski led against "The Road" - to prevent the construction of barriers dividing the community from the waterfront.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
When Fleet Street Kitchen introduced its tasting menu a few months ago, there was only a five-course option. Starting tonight, the restaurant is expanding the offerings to include three-course and seven course tasting options. The cost of the tasting menu is $45 for three courses, $65 for five courses and $85 for seven courses.  And a vegetarian tasting menu will be offered for $35, $55 and $75 for three, five and seven courses, respectively. Wine pairings can be ordered at an additional cost.
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