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By Matt Vensel | September 19, 2011
The Ravens secured a flawless victory over the Pittsburgh Steelers in Week 1, but a few potential weak spots were exposed by the Tennessee Titans as the Ravens experienced a road letdown in a 26-13 loss in Nashville. Titans quarterback Matt Hasselbeck threw for 358 passing yards against a Ravens secondary that was missing first-round pick Jimmy Smith and veteran nickel back Chris Carr. Baltimore couldn't contain Kenny Britt down the field. And in the first two games of the season, the Ravens have allowed more than 600 passing yards.
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SPORTS
By Drew Sharp and Detroit Free Press Columnist | October 6, 2014
DETROIT -- The eighth inning came Sunday without any participation from the Tigers' bullpen - much to the delight of an emotionally brittle baseball town still enraged at the abomination in Baltimore. David Price did his job in Game 3, keeping manager Brad Ausmus from walking out of the dugout and motioning to the bullpen. But momentarily filling one hole exposed another. That's how history will critique the 2014 Tigers. Opportunity wasted. The Tigers' season ended in a 2-1 whimper.
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NEWS
July 3, 2012
The epic power outages have laid bare one of the fatal flaws of the state's growth policies for the Baltimore-Washington region: Our public infrastructure and services are inadequate to meet the demands of today's residents and workers. We need to make today's Baltimore-Washington region more livable before we can even begin to think about a future megalopolis that would be more congested and more demanding of infrastructure and services than the one we already have. Anthony J. Di Giacomo
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2014
It's not every day that a law professor has his book quoted by the Supreme Court, and so the University of Baltimore's Michael I. Meyerson was understandably intrigued when his 2012 work about the Framers' views on religion made it into Monday's decision on public prayer. But the plug from Justice Anthony M. Kennedy, who wrote the majority opinion, was somewhat bittersweet. Meyerson says the decision misread the point of his book and took the quote out of context in a way that allowed the justices to draw an entirely different conclusion about how the Founding Fathers approached religion in public.
NEWS
November 19, 2011
Various commentators, including Susan Reimer and Jon Stewart, have compared the child abuse scandal at Penn State to the scandals involving young boys in the Roman Catholic church. The connection is valid if you view both institutions as being more concerned about avoiding scandal than protecting victims of abuse. But a true comparison would be if Penn State, Florida State, UCLA, Boston College, Arizona State and a dozen other colleges across the country all reported child abuse cases over the same 20-30 year period, involving multiple "coaches" whose acts were covered up. "Fr. Sandusky" would not have been fired and booted off campus.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
Paul McMullin wants to reassure people that "we're not going to have satellites falling on our heads" because Intel Corp.'s Pentium chip has a flaw.Still, the network administrator at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory said scientists at the high-tech center in Howard County are worried that the glitch could throw off critical calculations -- with potentially serious consequences."
NEWS
By Luther Young | October 5, 1990
NASA unveiled a smorgasbord of color photographs from the Hubble Space Telescope yesterday, polishing the image of the $1.5 billion orbiting observatory despite its serious mirror flaw and continuing stability problems caused by a jitter from its solar panels.The photos -- including the closest view ever of Pluto and its moon, Charon, plus some of the first visual evidence that black holes may exist -- have been taken recently as NASA engineers and scientists get the feel of Hubble and learn to make the most of its reduced capabilities.
NEWS
By Luther Young | April 23, 1991
A year after it was launched into Earth orbit with a seriously flawed main mirror, the Hubble Space Telescope is the "best optical telescope" in existence, according to NASA's program scientist for the $2 billion observatory.But Dr. Edward Weiler said yesterday he was concerned "how few people even know Hubble's working. It's going to be a long time" before the public understands the telescope is producing good science despite the flaw that hinders focusing on faintcelestial objects.During a telephone conference held from Goddard Space Flight Center to mark the launch last April 24, Dr. Weiler attributed the mirror problem to "a dumb human error, probably by two or three people out of 10,000" involved in Hubble's complex design and manufacture.
NEWS
By Robert S. Capersand Eric Lipton and Robert S. Capersand Eric Lipton,Hartford Courant | November 26, 1990
HARTFORD, Conn. -- NASA and a mirror manufacturer share the blame for a flaw that prevents the $1.5 billion Hubble Space Telescope from focusing clearly, a NASA panel has concluded after a five-month investigation.To some extent, the failure to detect a flaw polished into the 94.5-inch Hubble mirror in 1980 and 1981 is a product of the same management climate that led to the fatal explosion of the space shuttle Challenger in 1986, said John D. Mangus, one of six members of the Hubble Optical Systems Board of Investigation.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | January 16, 1995
A while back I decided to investigate life in the high speed lane -- to drive the PC equivalent of a nitromethane-fueled dragster.It feels wonderful. And with the prices falling as fast as horsepower is increasing, you can do it without mortgaging the house and kids.The machine I tried out was a Packard Bell Pentium 90 multimedia outfit, which packs a lot of punch for a price in the $2,500 to $3,000 range.The machine uses Intel's fastest microprocessor, and that's why I held off writing this review, even though I like the computer.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
A three-year state audit of the Maryland Transportation Authority found significant problems with how the organization handles purchases and an inadequate "disaster recovery plan" if its E-ZPass toll collection system fails. The authority, which operates state toll facilities and transportation infrastructure such as the Chesapeake Bay Bridge for the Maryland Department of Transportation, said it is addressing the issues. The report, released Wednesday by the state's Office of Legislative Audits, reviewed the agency's operations between January 2010 and March 2013.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Maryland is ditching the health insurance exchange it has spent tens of millions in federal and state dollars to develop, and Gov. Martin O'Malley's critics are heaping well-deserved condemnation on him for the debacle. Where they go wrong is in suggesting that he's making the same mistake all over again. Rep. Andy Harris, who has quite correctly sought to remedy the lack of accountability for the system's failure thus far, criticized the governor for adopting Connecticut's system, which he said will cost tens of millions more and be uncertain to work, instead of using the federal government's exchange, which he implied would be free of cost and risk.
NEWS
April 1, 2014
One last round of website crashes, jammed call center lines, frustrations and delays marked the end of Maryland's first open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act and ensured that the launch of the Maryland Health Connection will go down as one of the most expensive failures of governance in the state's history. A full accounting of how Maryland failed so badly while other states handled open enrollment with relative ease can't come soon enough. That said, Obamacare is not a website.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
In response to your article on the new school assessments (PARCC), there is no mention of their validation using accepted research methods ( "Superintendent wants to keep local control over schools," March 25). There should be at least the gold standard of 500 in the cohort; 250 experimentals and 250 controls. For example, since teachers teach to the test, 250 students could receive MSA preparation and testing, and 250 receive PARCC preparation and testing, and then compare the two testing results.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 15, 2014
I haven't visited Health Insurance Hell for a while, so I thought I'd stop and see how things are going. It's not so bad: At least 4.2 million new enrollees through federal and state Obamacare websites, with at least 1 million more expected through March 31, the deadline for getting insurance and avoiding a tax penalty. So, not as good as projected, but hardly the disaster Republicans keep saying it is. In addition to the federal Healthcare.gov, the state health insurance exchanges have picked up steam, too. As NPR reported: "The [state]
NEWS
March 14, 2014
The editorial "More study needed on birth injury bill" (March 12) supports the creation of a "task force" to study the implementation of a "new" system for handling medical negligence cases involving birth-related neurological injuries, similar to a program in Virginia. The idea of studying the Virginia program here in Maryland is far from new. Bills to create such a task force were introduced - and failed to garner support - in 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008. Del. Dan K. Morhaim, the doctor-legislator leading the current effort, was a lead sponsor of three of the four previously-introduced bills.
NEWS
By Luther Young and Luther Young,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 28, 1990
WASHINGTON -- An independent panel investigating the Hubble Space Telescope mirror flaw concluded yesterday that the manufacturer discounted and withheld critical test data that would have alerted NASA overseers to a problem during the fabrication of the huge mirror.In the final report on its five-month study, the panel also scolded the space agency for accepting the "closed environment" at Perkin-Elmer Corp. of Danbury, Conn., that allowed the flaw to occur and to go undetected until after the $1.5 billion telescope's launch in April.
NEWS
By The Hartford Courant | November 26, 1990
Blame for the flawed Hubble space telescope must be shared by NASA because engineers were discouraged from reporting problems, an agency investigation has concluded."
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | March 13, 2014
The effectiveness of the volunteer firefighters who responded earlier this week to the scene of a car fire at a commercial garage in Joppa is exemplary of why it is important for Harford County to try to figure out a way to resolve the funding issues related to providing ambulance service. It was bad enough that the fire was the result of an automotive gasoline tank that was, according to fire investigators, set ablaze by someone drilling into or near the tank. Putting out a gasoline fire is no easy task and, not only is gasoline flammable like kerosene and plenty of other petroleum products, but it is also potentially explosive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
A new exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum is an homage to unsteady hands and uncertain tempers, to chips and nicks, to the inconsistent and unfinished. In "Designed for Flowers: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics," many of the 60 vases on display contain an obvious and intentional flaw. One artist, who is known for kicking each pot with a boot before it is fired, has deliberately gouged a small V-shaped segment from his vessel's rim. In a vase by another artist, the upper lip of the vase departs from a uniform circle and wobbles slightly.
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