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By Robert B. Reich | October 26, 2011
The so-called "flat tax" is all the rage among Republican presidential hopefuls. Herman Cain was the first. Now, Rick Perry and Newt Gingrich have come up with their own flat-tax proposals. The flat tax is a fraud. It raises taxes on the poor and lowers them on the rich. The nonpartisan Tax Policy Center estimates that Mr. Cain's flat-tax plan (the only one that's been set out in any detail) would lower the after-tax incomes of poor households (incomes below $30,000) by 16 percent to 20 percent.
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NEWS
April 12, 2013
It seems Easter was a field day for attacking Dr. Ben Carson for his conservative views ("Ben Carson's biblically based conservatism," March 31.) Columnist Dan Rodricks claimed he was not surprised by Dr. Carson's equating gays with pedophiles and people who have sex with animals. Mr. Rodricks then delved into a 2008 radio interview for more dirt to support his critique of Dr. Carson's conservatism, showing how Dr. Carson used the Bible to support such things as corporal punishment by parents and as justification of a flat tax. Well perhaps more people need to be seeking answers in the Bible or in their faith.
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NEWS
February 15, 2013
Every year around this time, the media are replete with stories, both serious and funny, about the density, complexity, and inanity of our tax code ("The Carson monologue" Feb 12). One has to wonder if maybe we've gone a little too far in punishing, rewarding, and buying votes via the tax code. A shout out to Steve Forbes, and a huge amen to Dr. Ben Carson, for their pleas for a flat tax akin to the Biblical tithe wherein God asks a fixed, flat 10 percent year-in and year-out with no loopholes, no deductions, no exemptions.
NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | April 8, 2013
Liberal media have again shown that they can be just as self-righteous and intolerant as their ardent conservative adversaries. How else to account for the recent furor over views expressed by a world-renowned pediatric surgeon, neurologist and medical scholar? Baltimore's Dr. Benjamin Carson, an eminent Johns Hopkins Hospital figure long admired by people of all political stripes, including many liberals, is now being derided as a turncoat or doddering fool. His invitation to speak at a Hopkins commencement might be withdrawn.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | October 28, 2011
As unemployment continues to dominate the nation's political consciousness, the Republican presidential candidates continue to think and talk about tax reform. It's clear evidence that their primary focus is winning the GOP presidential nomination rather than lifting the country out of its economic doldrums. How else to explain their intramural debate on taxes, most recently highlighted by Texas Gov. Rick Perry's resurrection of the old flat tax that business magazine magnate Steve Forbes floated in his failed bids for the same prize in 1996 and 2000?
NEWS
By Mona Charen | December 1, 1994
IMAGINE THAT it is April 14, 1996. You sit at your kitchen table to prepare your federal income tax return. The form is the size of a postcard. It asks for your name, address, Social Security number and occupation. The next 10 lines ask for your income, your personal allowances, your dependents and any taxes already paid. You calculate your tax -- 17 percent of your income less allowances -- enclose a check and mail it.Before this past election, talk of that kind of dramatic and radical tax reform would have been considered fanciful, if not delusional.
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | March 19, 1992
FORMER California Gov. Jerry Brown placed a surprisingly strong second in Michigan, by moving into the vacuum on the Democratic Party left. He played to the beleaguered United Auto Workers union, and embraced other populist outsiders such as Ralph Nader and Jesse Jackson. But his flat tax proposal is preposterous and cynical.Take a close look at what Mr. Brown has called the "silver-bullet solution for the 1990s." That slogan alone should be a tip-off; there are no silver-bullet solutions.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Another new Bob Dole emerged this week: the tax collector for the conservative opportunity society.When Mr. Dole declared his presidential candidacy, he not only committed himself to cutting taxes; he also called for a tax system that's "lower, fairer, flatter and simpler."Flat-tax fever is sweeping the Republican Party. And the Senate majority leader, the early favorite to win the Republican nomination, is only the latest to catch it.Mr. Dole, whose push for higher taxes in the 1980s led Newt Gingrich to tag him "the tax collector for the welfare state," now envisions a day when "ordinary people like you and me could fill out our tax form without a lawyer or an accountant or both."
NEWS
By Randy Tate | July 11, 1999
AMERICA is currently enjoying a remarkable economic boom, characterized by low unemployment, low inflation and almost weekly new stock market highs. More and more estimates are predicting a tremendous federal budget surplus over the next 10 years. But unless we demand and implement profound tax reform now, Washington bureaucrats and special interests will devise countless ways to spend the surplus. Economic growth and prosperity cannot be measured just in terms of the gross national product, the Dow Jones average and per capita income.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | January 22, 1996
DES MOINES, Iowa -- When Republican presidential candidate Steve Forbes faced the other eight GOP contenders in debate here a week ago, he was bombarded with criticism about his proposal for a flat 17 percent tax on all earned income for everybody, with no deductions. But in the process he has elevated the issue to center stage, with other candidates now offering variations on Mr. Forbes' johnny-one-note theme.Sen. Phil Gramm formally proposed a flat tax of his own at 16 percent the other day, and news commentator Pat Buchanan has his version.
NEWS
April 2, 2013
In his Sunday column, Dan Rodricks proved the correctness of Ben Carson's statement concerning the PC police ("Ben Carson's conservative views are drawn from the Bible" Mar 30). If you make a statement that is politically incorrect, you will be attacked by the liberals who will try to shut you up. Ben Carson did not make any homophobic statements. He merely said that God's word says that marriage is between a man and a woman. That is our creator's design, not man's and no man can change God's plan to suit their own desires.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 30, 2013
I am not among the many who are shocked that Ben Carson, the brilliant and widely admired neurosurgeon based at Johns Hopkins Hospital, would emerge as a hero of the political right and Sean Hannity's new best friend. That Carson would stoop to making (and later sort of apologizing for) homophobic remarks on Hannity's national television show - associating gays with pedophiles and people who have sex with animals - didn't surprise me, either. I know: Here's a man who separated conjoined twins, improved and saved the lives of countless children, established a scholars program that has benefited hundreds of young people, wrote inspirational books and gave countless motivational speeches.
NEWS
February 15, 2013
Every year around this time, the media are replete with stories, both serious and funny, about the density, complexity, and inanity of our tax code ("The Carson monologue" Feb 12). One has to wonder if maybe we've gone a little too far in punishing, rewarding, and buying votes via the tax code. A shout out to Steve Forbes, and a huge amen to Dr. Ben Carson, for their pleas for a flat tax akin to the Biblical tithe wherein God asks a fixed, flat 10 percent year-in and year-out with no loopholes, no deductions, no exemptions.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 13, 2013
In an earlier era, Dr. Benjamin Carson's speech before the National Prayer Breakfast last week would have been a really big deal rather than mere fodder for a brief squall on Twitter and cable news. Born in crushing poverty to an illiterate single mother dedicated to seeing her children succeed, Dr. Carson became the head of the department of pediatric neurosurgery at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions when he was 33. He's been a black celebrity role model ever since. Even if you didn't like the substance of what Dr. Carson had to say at the breakfast, his speech made for great political theater.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
Dr. Benjamin Carson, the eminent Johns Hopkins pediatric neurosurgeon, has received much attention over the years not only for his skills in the operating room but for what he has achieved beyond it. For many Baltimoreans, his story is a familiar one - born in Detroit, raised in poverty by a single mother, he overcame much to not only become a Medal of Freedom winner but a benefactor to thousands of young people through his scholarship program....
NEWS
March 26, 2012
The House of Delegates' rewrite of next year's state budget takes some important steps toward making Maryland's finances sustainable without dipping quite so deeply into taxpayers' pockets as the Senate's plan. It's not perfect, and some details will still need to be ironed out in negotiations between the two chambers, but it appears to be heading in the right direction. Here's what remains to be decided in the weeks ahead: • Income taxes. The House has drastically scaled back the income tax increases in the Senate's plan and focused the burden more exclusively on those at the upper end of the income scale - without the creation of a problematic "super-bracket" for those who make more than $500,000 a year.
NEWS
By TRB | March 26, 1992
Jerry Brown's campaign technique is to grab onto some issue he's shown no previous sign of caring about, and then to NTC condemn with self-righteous wrath everyone else who fails to join him immediately in his new-found faith. In Mr. Brown's way of thinking, you are hopelessly corrupt if you still think as he thought until the day before yesterday.In his long public career, Jerry Brown never expressed any interest in election-finance reform or tax simplification until now. These are both worthy causes, but they are poisoned by Mr. Brown's transparent opportunism.
NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | August 7, 2005
IT'S TRUE that the Republicans are the party of ideas and the Democrats are the party of reaction. Republicans set the agenda, and Democrats try to talk the country out of it. But the Republican Party is hardly the Institute for Advanced Studies. The GOP uses ideas like seasonal sports equipment - taking them out when needed then scraping the mud off and stuffing them back into the garage until they are needed again. Remember term limits? The flag-burning amendment? The balanced budget amendment?
NEWS
February 22, 2012
Americans could scarcely be blamed for viewing any proposal to "simplify" taxes with skepticism. From Steve Forbes' flat tax of 1996 to Herman Cain's recent 9-9-9 proposal, efforts to make taxes simpler have usually meant - at least when held up to closer scrutiny - shifting the budgetary burden from the rich to the working class. But what President Barack Obama revealed today appears to be a far more reasonable attempt to reduce the nation's corporate tax rate from 35 percent to 28 percent (and allowing manufacturers an even lower 25 percent)
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 28, 2012
Summertime is usually when TV networks air repeats of shows we've already seen. In his State of the Union Address this week, the president got a five-month jump on the summer season by re-running a class-envy video he has broadcast more times than local stations have shown episodes of "The Andy GriffithShow. " Instead of a credible assessment of the state of the union, which is not good, the president delivered a slightly toned-down campaign speech. We heard more of the same about how "the rich" aren't paying their "fair share" in taxes.
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