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By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Port officials have asked the state Public Utilities Commission to set a flat rate for taxi services to and from the cruise ship terminal and three popular city locations. James White, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, said passengers — many from out of state — have complained "that they are being overcharged and that taxi drivers are not turning their meters on. " He asked the commission to set a fare for trips to Fort McHenry, Pennsylvania Station and the Inner Harbor in the same way it established a $30 flat rate for fares to Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.
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NEWS
September 24, 2013
Mel Mintz's recent letter about Republican Harford County Executive David Craig's shift to the far right in preparation for the 2014 governor's race didn't go far enough ( "Craig campaign: From moderate center-right to uninformed extreme," Sept. 20). The so-called "rain tax" that the Harford County Council came up with, and Mr. Craig apparently approved, requires residential property owners to foot most of the bill through a flat rate, regardless of the amount of runoff. The council and Mr. Craig claim that the proportion of residential impervious surface in the county is 76 percent, but they fail to explain where that number came from.
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BUSINESS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1995
Bell Atlantic-Maryland yielded to the power of the Internet yesterday and withdrew a proposed rate structure for high-speed digital phone service to homes after an outcry from computer-using potential customers.In a letter delivered yesterday to the state Public Service Commission, the telephone company said it would instead continue to offer Integrated Services Digital Network to residential customers as part of a trial it previously had wanted to cut short.Last month, Bell Atlantic proposed a tariff of $19.50 per month, in addition to the regular line-rate charge, and either 2 cents a minute for peak period usage or 1 cent a minute for nights and weekends.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
Howard County Executive and lieutenant governor candidate Ken Ulman is proposing a new way to asses the so-called "rain tax ("Howard to revisit stormwater fees," June 22). Instead of basing it on the hard, impermeable surfaces of properties that contribute to runoff, he wants to tax owners of single-family homes a flat rate depending on the size of their lot regardless of how much runoff or absorption the property is responsible for. Not only was the "rain tax" another future O'Malley legacy to bad government, our outgoing county executive wants to turn it into what appears to be just an increase in the property tax in order to lessen objections to another stupid burden on the taxpayer.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
Howard County Executive and lieutenant governor candidate Ken Ulman is proposing a new way to asses the so-called "rain tax ("Howard to revisit stormwater fees," June 22). Instead of basing it on the hard, impermeable surfaces of properties that contribute to runoff, he wants to tax owners of single-family homes a flat rate depending on the size of their lot regardless of how much runoff or absorption the property is responsible for. Not only was the "rain tax" another future O'Malley legacy to bad government, our outgoing county executive wants to turn it into what appears to be just an increase in the property tax in order to lessen objections to another stupid burden on the taxpayer.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
Since we're talking about the meaning of fairness in taxation, how about a fixed, flat rate? This would be akin to the biblical tithe, where God asks a fixed, flat 10 percent a year, year in and year out, no exemptions, no exceptions, no deductions. If the flock has a good year, then God has a good year, and vice versa. Whether one is 8 or 80 years old, everyone can understand it, and no one needs an accountant to figure it out. If it's good enough for God, it ought to be good enough for Caesar.
NEWS
September 24, 2013
Mel Mintz's recent letter about Republican Harford County Executive David Craig's shift to the far right in preparation for the 2014 governor's race didn't go far enough ( "Craig campaign: From moderate center-right to uninformed extreme," Sept. 20). The so-called "rain tax" that the Harford County Council came up with, and Mr. Craig apparently approved, requires residential property owners to foot most of the bill through a flat rate, regardless of the amount of runoff. The council and Mr. Craig claim that the proportion of residential impervious surface in the county is 76 percent, but they fail to explain where that number came from.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1996
Bell Atlantic Corp. said yesterday that it has introduced a flat-rate pricing plan that will simplify the rates Maryland businesses pay for toll calls on its network.The plan, which is now in effect, sets the price for toll calls within each of the state's four regional calling areas at 9 cents perminute, any time of day.The pricing plan does not affect the price of calls between the calling areas -- Baltimore, the Washington suburbs, the Eastern Shore and Western Maryland.For example, a three-minute call from an Ellicott City business to Bel Air will cost 27 cents.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | October 6, 1994
None of the new fall shows will beat Glenn Frey's record last year, when his "South of Sunset" series was axed after one airing, but the heads are starting to roll on network row.Don't look for Chad Everett's "McKenna" tonight (or, maybe, any night again) on ABC. The network yanked it from the schedule after just two outings. It will be replaced with the evergreen/ever-gray "Matlock" starting next Thursday.Replacing "McKenna" tonight at 9 on WJZ (Channel 13) is a special, "Billy Ray Cyrus: A year on the Road."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 25, 1999
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield, the state's largest health insurer, is pressing hospitals to accept a new payment system in which they would be paid a flat rate for each type of case.CareFirst says the system will save money for its subscribers and promote efficient care, but the Maryland Hospital Association complains that CareFirst is simply using its muscle to force a rate cut.The insurer wrote to hospitals last week, briefly explaining the new system, and began meeting with hospitals this week to provide fuller explanation and to propose new rates.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
More than 16,000 Anne Arundel County homeowners who pay for unmetered sewer service but not public water probably will see their wastewater bills drop by about one-third, after the county auditor's office said they were paying too much. "They have been overcharged because their consumption was overstated by 50 percent," county auditor Teresa Sutherland said. Those customers probably will see wastewater bills decrease by more than $160 a year, as the county agreed with a recent audit recommendation to reduce the usage estimate at the root of the audit's findings.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Port officials have asked the state Public Utilities Commission to set a flat rate for taxi services to and from the cruise ship terminal and three popular city locations. James White, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, said passengers — many from out of state — have complained "that they are being overcharged and that taxi drivers are not turning their meters on. " He asked the commission to set a fare for trips to Fort McHenry, Pennsylvania Station and the Inner Harbor in the same way it established a $30 flat rate for fares to Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport.
NEWS
January 30, 2012
Since we're talking about the meaning of fairness in taxation, how about a fixed, flat rate? This would be akin to the biblical tithe, where God asks a fixed, flat 10 percent a year, year in and year out, no exemptions, no exceptions, no deductions. If the flock has a good year, then God has a good year, and vice versa. Whether one is 8 or 80 years old, everyone can understand it, and no one needs an accountant to figure it out. If it's good enough for God, it ought to be good enough for Caesar.
BUSINESS
By ANDREW LECKEY and ANDREW LECKEY,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 20, 2006
The cat is out of the bag. DaimlerChrysler AG, the world's third-largest vehicle-maker formed in the merger of Daimler-Benz AG and Chrysler Corp., was introduced as a "merger of equals" in 1998. Yeah, right. Top executives of the merged companies spoke proudly of the potential of the new partnership and how each side would benefit. Few believed them. Chrysler was in a tailspin and Daimler-Benz, the buyer, would run the company. Cut to 2006. Mustachioed DaimlerChrysler Chairman Dieter Zetsche is all over the airwaves and Internet as the firm's deadpan spokesman.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 30, 2004
If an auto repair shop says it charges $70 an hour for labor, and the job takes one hour, how much is the labor bill? David Verdiner thought the answer should be $70 when he had his car fixed at a Pep Boys - Manny, Moe & Jack Inc. garage in Los Angeles two years ago. The store had signs stating that its hourly labor rate was $70. But instead, Verdiner claims, he was billed $112 for the labor, even though the job took only 40 minutes. Verdiner paid his bill. But in October 2002 he sued Pep Boys for fraud and false advertising.
BUSINESS
By Todd Beamon and Todd Beamon,Baltimoresun.com Staff | April 27, 2004
Now at your Baltimore-area 7-Eleven: cell phones. The Dallas-based convenience-store chain today introduced a prepaid wireless telephone under its own brand name. Under the "Speak Out" program, customers can buy a Nokia phone for as little as $50 that operates on the Cingular Wireless network. The telephones are preprogrammed and the batteries pre-charged. Airtime charges are 20 cents per minute for local or long-distance calling. The phones are being sold at 7-Eleven stores in 14 cities, including the 128 outlets in the Baltimore area.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
Carroll County Farm Museum officials agreed yesterday to explore a proposal that would change the fees that festival vendors must pay to sell their wares at the popular tourist attraction, saving many businesses money.Under the proposal, vendors would pay a flat fee to reserve a sales booth at farm museum events. Nonprofit organizations are required to give the Westminster museum 10 percent of the money they raise. All other vendors must give 15 percent."I've talked with several vendors, and I think they would favor a flat fee," said Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge, who suggested the change during yesterday's Farm Museum Advisory Board meeting.
BUSINESS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 30, 2004
If an auto repair shop says it charges $70 an hour for labor, and the job takes one hour, how much is the labor bill? David Verdiner thought the answer should be $70 when he had his car fixed at a Pep Boys - Manny, Moe & Jack Inc. garage in Los Angeles two years ago. The store had signs stating that its hourly labor rate was $70. But instead, Verdiner claims, he was billed $112 for the labor, even though the job took only 40 minutes. Verdiner paid his bill. But in October 2002 he sued Pep Boys for fraud and false advertising.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Ratner and Andrew Ratner,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2003
When I made my first phone call ever over the Internet to my office last month, Anthony Waytekunas Jr., longtime business clerk at The Sun, answered with a cheery "Business news." Now I know how Alexander Graham Bell and Thomas Watson felt in 1876. Well, maybe it wasn't quite that momentous, but the call I placed on equipment from Vonage Digital Voice of New Jersey felt like the start of something mysterious and modern that may one day be commonplace. Vonage is a new breed of company that routes calls over the Internet instead of the traditional phone system.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2003
Five local taxicab companies have made an agreement with Annapolis to transport the homeless during the winter, a move that will eliminate the need for a police lieutenant to pick people up in his private bus. "Anything I can do to help somebody who's down and out, I'm for that," said Robert Eades, a driver for Neet N Kleen Cab Co., one of the companies working with the city. People who appear to need shelter will be referred by police officers and other city officials to one of the five companies.
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