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By SUN STAFF | September 23, 2003
If you're among the thousands of Maryland residents still waiting for the lights to come back on, chances are you're learning the fine art of living by flashlight. Ordinarily, a flashlight is buried in a drawer, forgotten. But Isabel has made it a must-have for even the most mundane activities of daily life. It can take time to master flashlight functioning, but here are some field-tested methods for a variety of after-dark situations: Eating: Candles are preferable; dining by candlelight has romance going for it. If not, place flashlight beside plate and enjoy takeout meal.
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NEWS
October 22, 2011
Take a haunted tour guided by 'Norman Bates' at Hitchcock after Dark , Saturday, Oct. 22, 8-10 p.m., Riverfront Park at end of Avondale Street. This fundraiser is presented by Venus Theatre, 21 C St. Tours also available Saturday, Oct. 29. Two nights only with four tours, half mile each, one starting at 8 p.m. and one at 9 p.m. each of the Saturdays. Enjoy s'mores, fall beverages, Hitchy costume contest and outdoor move, "The Birds!" Best Hitchcock costume wins door prize. Wear comfortable shoes and bring flashlight and movie watching blanket.
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NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1996
A would-be carjacker was reformed, if only for a morning, after his intended victim hit him on the head with a metal flashlight, sending him running away the same as he had approached -- a pedestrian.Marlene Rodriguez, 26, of Laurel was not injured when a man crept next to her as she sat in her car at 8 a.m. in the 7200 block of Dockside Lane in the Owen Brown village and pulled her from the vehicle, police said.The man demanded her keys, but Ms. Rodriguez was able to grab a flashlight from her vehicle and hit him. The man ran from the scene and dashed out of sight between houses near the Owen Brown Village Center, police said.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Columnist | February 19, 2007
Whenever I watch a Hollywood thriller where someone is chasing after someone else in the darkness, I always think: How come their flashlights work so much better than mine do? Case in point: My wife and I just rented The Wicker Man, which stars Nicolas Cage as a cop investigating the disappearance of a young girl on a spooky island inhabited by a pagan cult. (Note: Don't even think about watching this movie if you're at all depressed. Because the ending is a complete downer. Even before they roll the closing credits, you'll want to throw yourself in front of a bus.)
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | September 29, 2005
Recoil 2410 flashlight [Pelican, $59] As the days get shorter, the need for a reliable light source increases, especially if your eyes don't see as well as they once did. Pelican, the company famous for almost indestructible watertight and airtight equipment cases, has come up with a dandy flashlight for folks on the water. Flashlight seems too ordinary a name for the neon-yellow Recoil 2410. Start with the white, laser-like beam of light it generates. Unlike many flashlights that scatter light, the Recoil's entire beam is as tightly focused as a Jedi's light saber.
NEWS
August 19, 1993
POLICE* Long Reach: 5700 block of Yellow Rose Court: Three men in dark clothing were seen in front of and behind a house about 3:15 a.m. Sunday. There are no further details.* Kings Contrivance: 8900 block of Early April Way: A man was seen looking in windows about 11 p.m. Sunday.9400 block of Clock Tower Lane: Someone shined a flashlight in a rear sliding-glass door about 3:46 a.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer | June 19, 1992
Departmental charges were dropped yesterday against a county police officer accused of using excessive force while arresting a Glen Burnie man after a wild car chase last July."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erica Kritt and Erica Kritt,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2005
No matter the weather, a summer thunderstorm can approach at any moment and knock out the power and plans of the day. While the storm may be depressing, there are still lots of things that can get accomplished and keep kids having fun even when they're not in the sun. Kids nowadays are used to playing on their Xboxes, Playstations and computers, and a power outage can seem devastating. And to the younger set, it can be downright scary. But it doesn't have to be. There are many things to do when the lights go out, with just a flashlight and some fresh batteries.
NEWS
October 22, 2011
Take a haunted tour guided by 'Norman Bates' at Hitchcock after Dark , Saturday, Oct. 22, 8-10 p.m., Riverfront Park at end of Avondale Street. This fundraiser is presented by Venus Theatre, 21 C St. Tours also available Saturday, Oct. 29. Two nights only with four tours, half mile each, one starting at 8 p.m. and one at 9 p.m. each of the Saturdays. Enjoy s'mores, fall beverages, Hitchy costume contest and outdoor move, "The Birds!" Best Hitchcock costume wins door prize. Wear comfortable shoes and bring flashlight and movie watching blanket.
NEWS
By Gary Clement | December 26, 1999
Editor's note: By day, Signor Poochini is a dog, but by night he is a famous dog opera singer. Tonight is the premiere of the opera "Dog Giovanni," and he is singing the title role. But his master has left for the night and has closed his bedroom window. Now Signor Poochini has no way out! There are less than thirty minutes to showtime when Signor Poochini is startled by a series of inexplicable noises in Hersh's bedroom. A light tapping followed by a loud crack; a shattering smash followed by a long, slow creak.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | September 29, 2005
Recoil 2410 flashlight [Pelican, $59] As the days get shorter, the need for a reliable light source increases, especially if your eyes don't see as well as they once did. Pelican, the company famous for almost indestructible watertight and airtight equipment cases, has come up with a dandy flashlight for folks on the water. Flashlight seems too ordinary a name for the neon-yellow Recoil 2410. Start with the white, laser-like beam of light it generates. Unlike many flashlights that scatter light, the Recoil's entire beam is as tightly focused as a Jedi's light saber.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erica Kritt and Erica Kritt,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2005
No matter the weather, a summer thunderstorm can approach at any moment and knock out the power and plans of the day. While the storm may be depressing, there are still lots of things that can get accomplished and keep kids having fun even when they're not in the sun. Kids nowadays are used to playing on their Xboxes, Playstations and computers, and a power outage can seem devastating. And to the younger set, it can be downright scary. But it doesn't have to be. There are many things to do when the lights go out, with just a flashlight and some fresh batteries.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | September 23, 2003
If you're among the thousands of Maryland residents still waiting for the lights to come back on, chances are you're learning the fine art of living by flashlight. Ordinarily, a flashlight is buried in a drawer, forgotten. But Isabel has made it a must-have for even the most mundane activities of daily life. It can take time to master flashlight functioning, but here are some field-tested methods for a variety of after-dark situations: Eating: Candles are preferable; dining by candlelight has romance going for it. If not, place flashlight beside plate and enjoy takeout meal.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | June 27, 2002
As Y2K approached and the world waited for blackouts that never came, human-powered electric gadgets saw a surge of popularity. These radios, flashlights and other devices don't need batteries - they get their power from cranks, levers and other gizmos that work on the principles of induction discovered almost two centuries ago by British physicist Michael Faraday. Although Y2K is now remembered as the "Disaster that Wasn't," some of these gadgets are still handy to have around. The Excalibur Forever Flashlight is one of them.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2000
ASSATEAGUE ISLAND - John Henglein, a volunteer for the Maryland Coastal Bays Program, splashed through the water behind a stone jetty at the northern tip of this barrier island one evening last week, counting horseshoe crabs in their spring mating frenzy. He is among about 70 volunteers who annually record the number of clasping pairs - burrowed and swimming - as well as satellite males trying to get in on the mating, and solitary males. The information, gathered for the state Department of Natural Resources from 14 beaches around Assawoman, Isle of Wight, Sinepuxent and Chincoteague bays near Maryland's beach resorts and three on Chesapeake Bay, will be shared as part of a larger East Coast effort to develop a plan to manage the horseshoe crab fishery.
NEWS
By Gary Clement | December 26, 1999
Editor's note: By day, Signor Poochini is a dog, but by night he is a famous dog opera singer. Tonight is the premiere of the opera "Dog Giovanni," and he is singing the title role. But his master has left for the night and has closed his bedroom window. Now Signor Poochini has no way out! There are less than thirty minutes to showtime when Signor Poochini is startled by a series of inexplicable noises in Hersh's bedroom. A light tapping followed by a loud crack; a shattering smash followed by a long, slow creak.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 19, 1991
While I was fiddling with a broken flashlight the other day, a chair broke. This cycle of one hurried repair leading to another homefront accident is a pattern I am familiar with. I call it the-fireman-at-the-front-door syndrome.This is a reference to what happened to a friend of mine when the claw feet fell off his bathtub one Sunday night with him in it. The tilted tub snapped the hot water pipe, sending a stream of water into the air.He jumped out of the tub, and when he couldn't get a plumber on the phone, hastily called the fire department.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 22, 1997
I was walking through my bedroom on a recent Sunday morning when I suddenly had a feeling that something was wrong. I'm not sure how I knew; perhaps it was a sixth sense I've developed after years of home ownership. Or perhaps it was the fact that there was water coming out of the ceiling.But whatever tipped me off, I knew that I had a potentially serious problem, so I did not waste time. Moving swiftly but without panic, I went into the living room and read the entire sports section of the newspaper, thus giving the problem a chance to go away by itself.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 22, 1997
I was walking through my bedroom on a recent Sunday morning when I suddenly had a feeling that something was wrong. I'm not sure how I knew; perhaps it was a sixth sense I've developed after years of home ownership. Or perhaps it was the fact that there was water coming out of the ceiling.But whatever tipped me off, I knew that I had a potentially serious problem, so I did not waste time. Moving swiftly but without panic, I went into the living room and read the entire sports section of the newspaper, thus giving the problem a chance to go away by itself.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1996
A would-be carjacker was reformed, if only for a morning, after his intended victim hit him on the head with a metal flashlight, sending him running away the same as he had approached -- a pedestrian.Marlene Rodriguez, 26, of Laurel was not injured when a man crept next to her as she sat in her car at 8 a.m. in the 7200 block of Dockside Lane in the Owen Brown village and pulled her from the vehicle, police said.The man demanded her keys, but Ms. Rodriguez was able to grab a flashlight from her vehicle and hit him. The man ran from the scene and dashed out of sight between houses near the Owen Brown Village Center, police said.
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