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BUSINESS
By DAVID ZEILER | October 25, 2007
While it won't be available until 2009, Korean electronics company Samsung has unveiled a new type of flash memory chip that it says will enable the manufacture of 128-gigabyte memory cards. Oh, what Apple could do with a 128 GB flash card. Apple uses flash memory in many of its products, most notably its iPod and iPhone. Flash memory requires less power and is far less fragile than a hard drive, but provides much less storage space - at least in the capacities available today. While the hard drive-based iPod Classic comes in 80 GB and 160 GB versions - capable of holding 20,000 songs and 40,000 songs respectively - the 16 GB iPod Touch, Apple's largest-capacity flash-based product, holds just 3,500 songs.
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BUSINESS
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,McClatchy-Tribune | December 13, 2007
SanDisk Corp., well known for its wide variety of flash memory devices, has introduced an elegant little device lets you transfer any video on your computer and play it on a TV. But unlike two competing products, AppleTV and Pinncale's PCTV HD Ultimate Stick, TakeTV does its thing in a completely different way. At first glance, the TakeTV looks much like a flash memory stick. But sliding it open separates the TakeTV with the top part revealing its USB plug. This is the part that you insert into your computer.
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BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | October 20, 2005
When Apple Computer unveiled its hypercool iPod Nano in September, it gave music lovers the opportunity to cram 1,000 average-length tunes into a quarter-inch-thick player about the size of a business card. Apple's fans responded like a pack of wild dogs on meth - it may be months before the company can supply enough four-gigabyte Nano models to meet the demand, even at $300 a pop. That demand could also make it harder for other manufacturers to find the flash memory chips that make the Nano and so many other amazing gadgets possible.
BUSINESS
By DAVID ZEILER | October 25, 2007
While it won't be available until 2009, Korean electronics company Samsung has unveiled a new type of flash memory chip that it says will enable the manufacture of 128-gigabyte memory cards. Oh, what Apple could do with a 128 GB flash card. Apple uses flash memory in many of its products, most notably its iPod and iPhone. Flash memory requires less power and is far less fragile than a hard drive, but provides much less storage space - at least in the capacities available today. While the hard drive-based iPod Classic comes in 80 GB and 160 GB versions - capable of holding 20,000 songs and 40,000 songs respectively - the 16 GB iPod Touch, Apple's largest-capacity flash-based product, holds just 3,500 songs.
BUSINESS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | September 17, 1997
Overcoming a fundamental barrier in the design of integrated circuits, Intel Corp. said today that it has figured out how to double the amount of information that can be put on a transistor.The giant chipmaker said it will use the breakthrough to create more powerful memory chips for products such as cellular phones, networking equipment and even video arcade games. For instance, a digital answering machine could have twice as much room for messages.Intel said that right now the new technology is good only for flash memory -- chips that retain information even after the products they reside in are turned off. It can't be used for regular computer memory, or for microprocessors such as Pentiums, which are far more complex.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Doug Bedell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 5, 2001
When Maria Fernandez bought her Olympus digital camera two years ago, the last consideration was the kind of flash memory her glistening silver-and-gold toy would require. "I thought flash memory was like batteries - a lot of companies make them, but they're interchangeable," she said at the Fry's Electronics Store in Arlington, Texas. "Boy, was I wrong." As a PDA-addicted, MP3-listening, digital camera-toting child of the Internet Age, Fernandez was shopping for three types of flash memory.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1992
International Business Machines Corp. will launch two computing magazines later this month aimed at customers and potential customers.Though the magazines essentially will be marketing vehicles for IBM, they will accept ads from competing computer and software companies.The magazines, called Profit and Beyond Computing, will be distributed by controlled circulation, a tactic used by many trade publications that targets people in certain industries or job classifications.The magazines, which will come out every other month, will be sent free of charge to those that meet the qualifications.
BUSINESS
By Pat Dorsey and Pat Dorsey,MORNINGSTAR.COM | August 6, 2000
At this point in the midyear earnings Super Bowl, let's see what clues we have about where the tech sector might be heading. Let's start with PCs, because there's not a whole lot going on these days. There seems to be a slight shift in PC demand away from the low end and toward the high end - witness last month's profit warning by low-end vendor eMachines. In any case, it's becoming increasingly clear that PC makers need to do more than just sell beige boxes to survive. They need to develop decent-size streams of higher-margin non-PC revenue (like Gateway)
BUSINESS
By Craig Crossman and Craig Crossman,McClatchy-Tribune | December 13, 2007
SanDisk Corp., well known for its wide variety of flash memory devices, has introduced an elegant little device lets you transfer any video on your computer and play it on a TV. But unlike two competing products, AppleTV and Pinncale's PCTV HD Ultimate Stick, TakeTV does its thing in a completely different way. At first glance, the TakeTV looks much like a flash memory stick. But sliding it open separates the TakeTV with the top part revealing its USB plug. This is the part that you insert into your computer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2001
Rio MP3 player makes carrying favorite tunes a snap Avocent's $299 SwitchView DT switches between computers. I love the digital music age. I can carry my favorite tunes in my back pocket, pull them out and play a party's worth of music any time I like. The Rio 800 Digital Audio Player makes digital music particularly worthwhile. It fits easily into the palm of your hand, and its 128-megabyte flash memory has enough capacity for two to four hours of digital music stored in MP3 or Windows Media format.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | October 20, 2005
When Apple Computer unveiled its hypercool iPod Nano in September, it gave music lovers the opportunity to cram 1,000 average-length tunes into a quarter-inch-thick player about the size of a business card. Apple's fans responded like a pack of wild dogs on meth - it may be months before the company can supply enough four-gigabyte Nano models to meet the demand, even at $300 a pop. That demand could also make it harder for other manufacturers to find the flash memory chips that make the Nano and so many other amazing gadgets possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin E. Washington and Kevin E. Washington,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2004
It's hard for me to say which technological achievements over the past decade are most impressive. I'm a serious digital camera and camcorder buff, but in reality, I could do many of the same things using film cameras and analog video cameras. But the technological advances that allow me to print photographs at home and have a copier on my desk for under $100 continue to wow me. Printers, thanks to innovations in long-lasting or durable inks and direct connections to flash memory and digital cameras, have become the most-used peripherals in my home.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 4, 2003
If you're looking at digital cameras this holiday season, you have plenty of company. Digital cameras are better and easier to use than ever. And this year, you can buy one that produces close-to-film quality without breaking the budget. I noticed the change this summer on a trip to Italy, where at least a third of the tourists I saw were snapping digital photos. According to the U.S. Photo Marketing Association, the number of rolls of film processed by photofinishers here has been declining since 2000, and the organization expects digital cameras to outsell film cameras for the first time this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | October 17, 2002
I have used digital cameras at family gatherings for years, but I've always been squeamish about depending on one to record our vacations. And not without reason. Until recently, digital cameras that cost less than a thousand dollars couldn't deliver the quality of film cameras that sell for a fraction of the price. When you're spending hard-earned vacation time and money to visit the most spectacular locations in the country, you want to bring back the best possible photos. Also, what do you do with your digital pictures on the road?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Dritsas and Collin Keefe and David Dritsas and Collin Keefe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 16, 2002
Even with the wonders of the Internet, physical file exchanging -- taking files from one machine and transferring them to another using a physical medium -- is still a common practice among computer users. But ever-evolving formats of disk types are nerve-wracking. Copying to CD-RW -- even as fast as it can be these days -- can be time-consuming. Zip drives are not commonplace and floppy disks are becoming passe. A new kind of PC storage device is emerging: the driveless storage device.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Doug Bedell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 5, 2001
When Maria Fernandez bought her Olympus digital camera two years ago, the last consideration was the kind of flash memory her glistening silver-and-gold toy would require. "I thought flash memory was like batteries - a lot of companies make them, but they're interchangeable," she said at the Fry's Electronics Store in Arlington, Texas. "Boy, was I wrong." As a PDA-addicted, MP3-listening, digital camera-toting child of the Internet Age, Fernandez was shopping for three types of flash memory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Sasaki | September 7, 1998
Motorola is offering the Cadillac of pagers with PageWriter 0) 2000Motorola's PageWriter 2000 is the Cadillac of two-way pagers. The $400 unit ($440 with deluxe charger) has a large back-lighted screen, 1.25 megabytes of RAM and a 47-key keyboard. Like a Cadillac, it's not small - it's the size of a thick deck of cards, and weighs 6.7 ounces (including the battery). That's not enough to develop new muscles, but it feels fairly heavy hanging on your belt. The flip lid allows message viewing while the pager is still on your belt clip, a handy feature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 4, 2003
If you're looking at digital cameras this holiday season, you have plenty of company. Digital cameras are better and easier to use than ever. And this year, you can buy one that produces close-to-film quality without breaking the budget. I noticed the change this summer on a trip to Italy, where at least a third of the tourists I saw were snapping digital photos. According to the U.S. Photo Marketing Association, the number of rolls of film processed by photofinishers here has been declining since 2000, and the organization expects digital cameras to outsell film cameras for the first time this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2001
Rio MP3 player makes carrying favorite tunes a snap Avocent's $299 SwitchView DT switches between computers. I love the digital music age. I can carry my favorite tunes in my back pocket, pull them out and play a party's worth of music any time I like. The Rio 800 Digital Audio Player makes digital music particularly worthwhile. It fits easily into the palm of your hand, and its 128-megabyte flash memory has enough capacity for two to four hours of digital music stored in MP3 or Windows Media format.
BUSINESS
By Pat Dorsey and Pat Dorsey,MORNINGSTAR.COM | August 6, 2000
At this point in the midyear earnings Super Bowl, let's see what clues we have about where the tech sector might be heading. Let's start with PCs, because there's not a whole lot going on these days. There seems to be a slight shift in PC demand away from the low end and toward the high end - witness last month's profit warning by low-end vendor eMachines. In any case, it's becoming increasingly clear that PC makers need to do more than just sell beige boxes to survive. They need to develop decent-size streams of higher-margin non-PC revenue (like Gateway)
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