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By Luke Broadwater | July 11, 2011
You might know and love Flannery O'Connor as the legendary author of short fiction. (She's this humble correspondent's favorite short story writer -- mainly because could take the mundane motions of southern life and skew them into something dark and twisted.)   But did you know that O'Connor also drew weird, counter-culture cartoons?  Apparently, before she forever our consciousness with "A Good Man is Hard to Find," O'Connor was seriously pursuing a career as a cartoonist.
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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
A reader writes that hearing people say different than  grates on her. Having been taught that different from  is correct, she looks for validation.  Well.  As is so often the case in English, the actualities are more complex than what people recall that they were taught in school.  We'll start out with what Bryan Garner says.  " Different than  is often considered inferior to different from ...
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NEWS
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 1998
Zippergate, as the current Clinton mess is too jauntily named, is not about sex. It is not about perjury. It is not about sexual harassment. It is not about obstruction of justice. The scandal is about art, and how life imitates it; it's about symbols, and drama, and the tuning fork of perfect pitch, the sigh that registers inside you when events, character and point of view coalesce. It is famous real-life characters re-enacting scenes from stories written before they were born.Despite the best efforts of jaded television and newspaper analysts to unpack the Clinton-Lewinsky story as if it were merely another tawdry constitutional sex crime, this story defies easy reduction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater | July 11, 2011
You might know and love Flannery O'Connor as the legendary author of short fiction. (She's this humble correspondent's favorite short story writer -- mainly because could take the mundane motions of southern life and skew them into something dark and twisted.)   But did you know that O'Connor also drew weird, counter-culture cartoons?  Apparently, before she forever our consciousness with "A Good Man is Hard to Find," O'Connor was seriously pursuing a career as a cartoonist.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cox News Service | April 30, 2000
MILLEDGEVILLE, Ga. -- She likely would have thought it silly, but they're naming a year after her, anyway. In Milledgeville, where she grew up, studied and wrote many of her most enduring works, 2000 is "The Year of Flannery O'Connor." The declaration was made by Georgia College & State University, O'Connor's alma mater. Throughout this year, the school is sponsoring a variety of events celebrating the life and themes of the famous writer. On March 25, which would have been O'Connor's 75th birthday (she died in 1964 at the age of 39)
NEWS
July 18, 2000
Meredith MacRae, 56, who played comely country girl Billie Jo Bradley in the 1960s sitcom "Petticoat Junction," died Friday from brain cancer at home in Manhattan Beach, Calif. She played Billie Jo from 1966-70 on the CBS series, which starred Bea Benaderet as the widowed owner of the Shady Rest Hotel and mother of three eye-catching daughters who helped run the Hooterville establishment. Her first TV series was "My Three Sons," in which she played Sally, the love interest for Mike (Tim Considine)
NEWS
By H. H. Morris | November 10, 1994
THE SALESWOMAN arrived after I'd met several students in my office and had more waiting. She shook my hand and gave me her card."We have the most multicultural American literature textbook on the market, professor," she said."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | February 22, 2009
Flannery: A Life of Flannery O'Connor By Brad Gooch Little, Brown / 416 pages / $30 Brad Gooch opens Flannery, his biography of Flannery O'Connor, with a lost moment: an account of how when O'Connor was 5, the Pathe newsreel company sent a cameraman to her home in Savannah, Ga., to film a chicken she had trained to walk backward. Such an image highlights O'Connor's lifelong fascination with birds, but most telling is that even at this age, she was elusive, standing just outside our grasp.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
A reader writes that hearing people say different than  grates on her. Having been taught that different from  is correct, she looks for validation.  Well.  As is so often the case in English, the actualities are more complex than what people recall that they were taught in school.  We'll start out with what Bryan Garner says.  " Different than  is often considered inferior to different from ...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1999
Flannery O'Connor 1925-1964After graduating from Georgia State College for Women, Milledgeville, O'Connor studied creative writing at the University of Iowa. Her first novel, "Wise Blood" (1952), explored, in her own words, "religious consciousness without a religion." The work combines the keen ear for common speech, caustic religious imagination and flair for the absurd -- all traits that were to characterize her subsequent novel and collections of short stories. She is regarded as a master of the short story and one collection in particular, "A Good Man is Hard to Find," is a classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David L. Ulin and David L. Ulin,Los Angeles Times | February 22, 2009
Flannery: A Life of Flannery O'Connor By Brad Gooch Little, Brown / 416 pages / $30 Brad Gooch opens Flannery, his biography of Flannery O'Connor, with a lost moment: an account of how when O'Connor was 5, the Pathe newsreel company sent a cameraman to her home in Savannah, Ga., to film a chicken she had trained to walk backward. Such an image highlights O'Connor's lifelong fascination with birds, but most telling is that even at this age, she was elusive, standing just outside our grasp.
NEWS
July 18, 2000
Meredith MacRae, 56, who played comely country girl Billie Jo Bradley in the 1960s sitcom "Petticoat Junction," died Friday from brain cancer at home in Manhattan Beach, Calif. She played Billie Jo from 1966-70 on the CBS series, which starred Bea Benaderet as the widowed owner of the Shady Rest Hotel and mother of three eye-catching daughters who helped run the Hooterville establishment. Her first TV series was "My Three Sons," in which she played Sally, the love interest for Mike (Tim Considine)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cox News Service | April 30, 2000
MILLEDGEVILLE, Ga. -- She likely would have thought it silly, but they're naming a year after her, anyway. In Milledgeville, where she grew up, studied and wrote many of her most enduring works, 2000 is "The Year of Flannery O'Connor." The declaration was made by Georgia College & State University, O'Connor's alma mater. Throughout this year, the school is sponsoring a variety of events celebrating the life and themes of the famous writer. On March 25, which would have been O'Connor's 75th birthday (she died in 1964 at the age of 39)
NEWS
By Ben Neihart and Ben Neihart,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 1998
Zippergate, as the current Clinton mess is too jauntily named, is not about sex. It is not about perjury. It is not about sexual harassment. It is not about obstruction of justice. The scandal is about art, and how life imitates it; it's about symbols, and drama, and the tuning fork of perfect pitch, the sigh that registers inside you when events, character and point of view coalesce. It is famous real-life characters re-enacting scenes from stories written before they were born.Despite the best efforts of jaded television and newspaper analysts to unpack the Clinton-Lewinsky story as if it were merely another tawdry constitutional sex crime, this story defies easy reduction.
NEWS
By H. H. Morris | November 10, 1994
THE SALESWOMAN arrived after I'd met several students in my office and had more waiting. She shook my hand and gave me her card."We have the most multicultural American literature textbook on the market, professor," she said."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | June 16, 2002
Esquire's Big Book of Fiction, edited by Adrienne Miller (Context Books, 796 pages, $21.95) A glorious compendium! Here are 54 short stories that the magazine published over the 70 years that have passed since its launch in 1933. Names of near-classic greatness: Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, Flannery O'Connor, Vladimir Nabokov. More modernly, Phillip Roth. Don DeLillo, Russell Banks, Antonya Nelson and Thomas McGuane. The last story is "The Wish," by Joanna Scott, published by Esquire in February 2000.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES Title: "The Engines of God" Author: Jack McDevitt Publisher: Ace Books Length, price: 419 pages, $21.95 Recently, I found myself standing on a friend's porch several miles out in the countryside. It was a spectacularly clear night, and the stars were thick overhead. Another friend pointed past the Milky Way. "The center of the galaxy," he said, "is that way." Just for a moment, I felt what science-fiction fans refer to as the Sense of Wonder: the kick that reminds us of how big, complex and mysterious the universe really is. Jack McDevitt's splendid new novel, "The Engines of God," gives us this Sense of Wonder, straight up and undiluted. In the early 23rd century, humanity is in the early stages of exploring the stars. Chief among their discoveries are the relics of the Monument-Makers, a vanished race of beings who left enigmatic, profoundly evocative statues to mark their passing. A group of archaeologists is on the verge of uncovering major new information about them on the planet Quraqua. Back on Earth, however, society is poised on the brink of ecological collapse, and Quraqua is about to be colonized by humans. Although Mr. McDevitt doesn't hesitate to put his characters in harm's way, the driving force behind the events of the novel is curiosity, both intellectual and spiritual. Mr. McDevitt's basic sense of humanity enables us to feel the losses of the Monument-Makers as our own. As one of the characters notes early on, " 'All of the important things . . . will turn out to be universally shared. It's why there will be no true aliens.' " Not since Arthur C. Clarke's "Rendezvous with Rama" has the discovery of the artifacts of alien intelligence been treated so skillfully. Read "The Engines of God," and then go outside and look up at the stars.F. BRETT COX | December 4, 1994
Title: "The Good Body: Asceticism in Contemporary Culture"Editors: Mary G. Winkler and Letha B. ColePublisher: Yale University PressLength, price: 247 pages, $27.50 In spite of a sexy cover and fairly simple jacket copy, "The Good Body," a collection of essays edited by Mary Winkler and Letha Cole, is anything but a sexy, simple book. The 12 pieces range in subject from the "dynamic interplay between scientific discourse and dominant cultural categories" to the role of the body in Flannery O'Connor's work.
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