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By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 1997
Everywhere I went in Spain, fellow travelers were raving about flamenco, the folk dance and music of the Spanish Gypsies. I had to see it for myself, so I hopped on a train and headed for Granada, in Andalusia, the Southern part of Spain.Although purists may say authentic flamenco no longer exists, the performance that I found was still a feast for my eyes, ears and soul."Flamenco is a mix of all cultures," said Tatiana Garrido, a "professora" of flamenco at the Escuala Flamenco Mariquilla in Granada.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
Harriet S. Eisner, a popular ballet, modern dance and flamenco instructor who taught for nearly 30 years at her Harriet Sauber Eisner Studio of the Dance in Pikesville, died June 12 of pancreatic cancer at her One Slade Avenue home. She was 88. Harriet Sauber, the daughter of grocers, was born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. She was an Eastern High School graduate and earned a bachelor's degree in 1943 in English literature from Goucher College. Mrs. Eisner started dancing when she was a child and, not long after, became a teacher.
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NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | September 22, 1996
FEDERICO Garcia Lorca (1898-1936), one of the 20th century's greatest poets, was a lover of all things Spanish, and particularly the fiery, bittersweet music of his native Andalusia known as flamenco.Like Lorca's poems, flamenco embodies what the Spanish philosopher Ortega y Gasset once called the "tragic vision of life."It is the music of bullfighters and Gypsies, of outcasts and the poor. Like American jazz it is an improvisatorial art of the oppressed; its astonishing rhythmic complexity and exotic, Oriental melodies are shot through with the plangent harmonies of generations of suffering and a weary resignation to humanity's mortal destiny.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | January 21, 2007
A fringed black shawl with embroidered pink rose is draped across Kimmie Meissner's lap. A lacy mantilla rests on her shoulders. With the light of the fireplace dancing in her dark eyes, the world champion figure skater looks every bit the young Spanish lady she hopes to portray later this week at the U.S. championships. U.S. Figure Skating Championships Today-Saturday, Spokane, Wash., ESPN2; women's final live, Saturday, 4 p.m., chs. 2, 7
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1998
"Flamenco" opens in a large, beautiful space, a great room furnished with mirrors, panels and stark wooden chairs. It's tense with expectancy, awaiting the thing that will make its exquisite geometries come to life.Then it comes: a crowd of people, performers of the Spanish dance and music called flamenco. They enter and fill the darkened room, taking their places in and behind a row of chairs. Behind them, a golden light grows, transforming them into silhouettes. The shadows become beacons of sound, voices and instruments, and then acquire faces as the light grows -- faces old and young, careworn and lively.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | January 21, 2007
A fringed black shawl with embroidered pink rose is draped across Kimmie Meissner's lap. A lacy mantilla rests on her shoulders. With the light of the fireplace dancing in her dark eyes, the world champion figure skater looks every bit the young Spanish lady she hopes to portray later this week at the U.S. championships. U.S. Figure Skating Championships Today-Saturday, Spokane, Wash., ESPN2; women's final live, Saturday, 4 p.m., chs. 2, 7
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2006
At 8:30 p.m., the floor show at the Red Maple begins. In the swank, Lost in Translation kind of restaurant on North Charles Street, the dancer wipes sweat from her forehead; not perspiration or glow but sweat. Is she looking straight ahead or straight through us? Will she ever smile? There is staccato clapping and deep singing and guitar strumming and much heel stomping. It is sort of Riverdance-like, but unbound. Belly dancing, but covered. The closest comparison, though, is not to another dance but to a bullfight.
NEWS
April 5, 2002
Arts council to show Camera Club photos through May 11 Carroll County Camera Club will show members' favorite photographs tomorrow through May 11 at Carroll County Arts Council. Photos will feature subjects from nature and landscapes to portraiture and architecture. The arts council is at 15 E. Main St., Westminster. Information: 410-848-7272. Flamenco performers to be featured at WMC Guitarist Marija Temo and dancer Anna Menendez will perform a program of flamenco and classical Spanish music and dance at 8 p.m. Monday in Baker Memorial Chapel at Western Maryland College.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 2, 1997
You will know that Iran's rulers are moderates when they cancel the bounty for murdering a British citizen in Britain, not before.Clinton and Blair found common principle: Brash is good.Fossils in a Spanish cave suggest that a breed of human evolved there 800,000 years ago, in case you were wondering where flamenco came from.Hideki Irabu is a damn Yankee!Pub Date: 6/02/97
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 31, 2001
Guitar Sharon Isbin, guitarist. Concertos by Christopher Rouse and Tan Dun. Gulbenkian Orchestra; Muhai Tang, conductor. (Teldec 8573-81830-2) Sharon Isbin has an enviable track record of commissioning and championing new works for classical guitar; with this compact disc, recorded live in Lisbon, she documents another two worthy additions to that record. Baltimore-born Christopher Rouse's "Concert de Gaudi for Guitar and Orchestra" from 1999 takes as its starting point the fanciful Spanish architecture of Antoni Gaudi, who died in 1926.
FEATURES
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2006
At 8:30 p.m., the floor show at the Red Maple begins. In the swank, Lost in Translation kind of restaurant on North Charles Street, the dancer wipes sweat from her forehead; not perspiration or glow but sweat. Is she looking straight ahead or straight through us? Will she ever smile? There is staccato clapping and deep singing and guitar strumming and much heel stomping. It is sort of Riverdance-like, but unbound. Belly dancing, but covered. The closest comparison, though, is not to another dance but to a bullfight.
FEATURES
November 22, 2005
Tonight at 8, see ballet flamenco Jose Porcel at Montgomery College's Robert E. Parilla Performing Arts Center, 51 Mannakee St., Rockville. Porcel made his professional debut with the Ballet de Valencia and has toured around the world performing flamenco since 2000. Tickets are $36-$38. Call 301-279-5301.
NEWS
April 5, 2002
Arts council to show Camera Club photos through May 11 Carroll County Camera Club will show members' favorite photographs tomorrow through May 11 at Carroll County Arts Council. Photos will feature subjects from nature and landscapes to portraiture and architecture. The arts council is at 15 E. Main St., Westminster. Information: 410-848-7272. Flamenco performers to be featured at WMC Guitarist Marija Temo and dancer Anna Menendez will perform a program of flamenco and classical Spanish music and dance at 8 p.m. Monday in Baker Memorial Chapel at Western Maryland College.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 31, 2001
Guitar Sharon Isbin, guitarist. Concertos by Christopher Rouse and Tan Dun. Gulbenkian Orchestra; Muhai Tang, conductor. (Teldec 8573-81830-2) Sharon Isbin has an enviable track record of commissioning and championing new works for classical guitar; with this compact disc, recorded live in Lisbon, she documents another two worthy additions to that record. Baltimore-born Christopher Rouse's "Concert de Gaudi for Guitar and Orchestra" from 1999 takes as its starting point the fanciful Spanish architecture of Antoni Gaudi, who died in 1926.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | May 13, 1999
Before entering the small dance studio, you can hear the booming sound of their heels clicking and pounding on the hardwood floors.The noise is like thunder as the six students and their teacher rehearse for a performance of flamenco, the ancient folkloric dance of Spain.Flamenco dancer and teacher Natalia Monteleon leads the group, keeping a close eye on the intricate footwork and the women's swirling ruffled skirts. She claps out a rhythm, and the dancers concentrate on drumming the cadence into the floor.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1998
"Flamenco" opens in a large, beautiful space, a great room furnished with mirrors, panels and stark wooden chairs. It's tense with expectancy, awaiting the thing that will make its exquisite geometries come to life.Then it comes: a crowd of people, performers of the Spanish dance and music called flamenco. They enter and fill the darkened room, taking their places in and behind a row of chairs. Behind them, a golden light grows, transforming them into silhouettes. The shadows become beacons of sound, voices and instruments, and then acquire faces as the light grows -- faces old and young, careworn and lively.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 5, 1993
Carlos Montoya, a guitarist and composer who played an important role in transforming flamenco from a localized Spanish folk form into a style with an international following, died on Wednesday. He was 89 and lived in Wainscott, N.Y.The cause of death was heart failure, said his son Allan Montoya of Wainscott.Mr. Montoya was among the first flamenco guitarists to free his instrument from its accompanying role in dance and vocal performances. Before him, flamenco guitarists were able to show their virtuosity and improvisational flair in brief solo spots within ensemble programs, or in the ingenuity of their accompaniments.
FEATURES
November 22, 2005
Tonight at 8, see ballet flamenco Jose Porcel at Montgomery College's Robert E. Parilla Performing Arts Center, 51 Mannakee St., Rockville. Porcel made his professional debut with the Ballet de Valencia and has toured around the world performing flamenco since 2000. Tickets are $36-$38. Call 301-279-5301.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 2, 1997
You will know that Iran's rulers are moderates when they cancel the bounty for murdering a British citizen in Britain, not before.Clinton and Blair found common principle: Brash is good.Fossils in a Spanish cave suggest that a breed of human evolved there 800,000 years ago, in case you were wondering where flamenco came from.Hideki Irabu is a damn Yankee!Pub Date: 6/02/97
FEATURES
By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 1997
Everywhere I went in Spain, fellow travelers were raving about flamenco, the folk dance and music of the Spanish Gypsies. I had to see it for myself, so I hopped on a train and headed for Granada, in Andalusia, the Southern part of Spain.Although purists may say authentic flamenco no longer exists, the performance that I found was still a feast for my eyes, ears and soul."Flamenco is a mix of all cultures," said Tatiana Garrido, a "professora" of flamenco at the Escuala Flamenco Mariquilla in Granada.
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