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By Bloomberg News Service | December 16, 1994
CHICAGO -- The corporate owner of the Denny's restaurant chain is being sued again for racial discrimination, this time for an alleged incident at a suburban Chicago restaurant.Six black women charge that they were mistreated because of their race during a Dec. 7 stop at a Denny's restaurant in Oak Lawn, Ill., according to their lawyer, David Kremin.The suit contends that six adults and five children stopped into Denny's Oak Lawn restaurant earlier this month, following a Bible study class.
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BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | January 4, 2004
THIRTY-FIVE years after Congress passed the Fair Housing Act, do racial preferences and discrimination continue to exist in home mortgage finance? Are American homebuyers still charged higher rates or fees on their loans solely because of their skin color or racial heritage? The unfortunate answer appears to be yes. But that discrimination doesn't always take the form you might assume. Case in point: Consider the recent federal court settlement of a class action suit involving a prominent savings bank that is an active player in the mortgage market nationwide.
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NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 2, 1993
Fifty-three Denny's restaurants -- probably including the Annapolis Denny's where six black Secret Service officers claimed they were refused service this spring -- would become black-owned franchises by 1997 under an agreement signed in Baltimore yesterday between Flagstar Cos. Inc. and the NAACP.The agreement comes as Flagstar, a Spartanburg, S.C.-based corporation which has 120,000 employees in several restaurant groups, defends itself against several race-discrimination lawsuits filed against the Denny's chain.
NEWS
By Bloomberg News Service | December 16, 1994
CHICAGO -- The corporate owner of the Denny's restaurant chain is being sued again for racial discrimination, this time for an alleged incident at a suburban Chicago restaurant.Six black women charge that they were mistreated because of their race during a Dec. 7 stop at a Denny's restaurant in Oak Lawn, Ill., according to their lawyer, David Kremin.The suit contends that six adults and five children stopped into Denny's Oak Lawn restaurant earlier this month, following a Bible study class.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer | November 9, 1994
Making good on a pledge to increase economic opportunities for black America, the corporate owner of Denny's restaurants announced yesterday the sale of 17 franchises to an African-American-owned company in Atlanta.The agreement with NDI Inc. -- a young enterprise that owns Blockbuster video stores, a manufacturer of fast-food tray liners and a hair care company -- also provides for the purchase of five more franchises in 1995 and the construction of 25 new Denny's restaurants over five years, according to officials for both firms.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | September 20, 1994
A year after a much-touted agreement between the corporate owners of Denny's and the NAACP, both sides agree that there has been slow but steady progress toward its goal of creating millions of dollars in business and job opportunities for blacks and other minorities.Officials of Flagstar Companies Inc. and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People view the past year as a "start-up" period for the Fair Share Agreement, signed last summer in the wake of discrimination complaints against Denny's restaurants in Annapolis and San Jose, Calif.
NEWS
By Jeff Leeds and Jeff Leeds,Contributing Writer | July 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The owner of Denny's, under attack for allegedly discriminating against black customers, will sign an agreement today in Baltimore allowing the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to conduct random tests of the company's four restaurant chains for racial bias.Under the sweeping seven-year accord, Flagstar Corp., which owns 2,320 restaurants internationally -- including Denny's, Hardee's, Quincy's Steakhouse and El Pollo Loco -- will increase minority involvement in company management and in restaurant hiring and contracting.
NEWS
By Jeff Leeds and Jeff Leeds,Contributing Writer | July 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The owner of Denny's, under attack for allegedly discriminating against black customers, will sign an agreement today in Baltimore allowing the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to conduct random tests of the company's four restaurant chains for racial bias.Under the sweeping seven-year accord, Flagstar Corp., which owns 2,320 restaurants internationally -- including Denny's, Hardee's, Quincy's Steakhouse and El Pollo Loco -- will increase minority involvement in company management and in restaurant hiring and contracting.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | January 4, 2004
THIRTY-FIVE years after Congress passed the Fair Housing Act, do racial preferences and discrimination continue to exist in home mortgage finance? Are American homebuyers still charged higher rates or fees on their loans solely because of their skin color or racial heritage? The unfortunate answer appears to be yes. But that discrimination doesn't always take the form you might assume. Case in point: Consider the recent federal court settlement of a class action suit involving a prominent savings bank that is an active player in the mortgage market nationwide.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | October 11, 1993
When the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., executive director of the NAACP, sat down last week with Robert E. Allen, chairman of the talk went well beyond an embarrassing illustration in the company's employee magazine that Mr. Allen himself called "racist."Dr. Chavis pressed the chairman of the nation's largest long-distance carrier on issues such as the number of blacks in American Telephone & Telegraph Co. management and the company's dealings with African-American banks.It was an approach that has typified Dr. Chavis' first six months as the head of the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the country's largest and oldest civil rights group.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer | November 9, 1994
Making good on a pledge to increase economic opportunities for black America, the corporate owner of Denny's restaurants announced yesterday the sale of 17 franchises to an African-American-owned company in Atlanta.The agreement with NDI Inc. -- a young enterprise that owns Blockbuster video stores, a manufacturer of fast-food tray liners and a hair care company -- also provides for the purchase of five more franchises in 1995 and the construction of 25 new Denny's restaurants over five years, according to officials for both firms.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Ivan Penn contributed to this article | September 20, 1994
A year after a much-touted agreement between the corporate owners of Denny's and the NAACP, both sides agree that there has been slow but steady progress toward its goal of creating millions of dollars in business and job opportunities for blacks and other minorities.Officials of Flagstar Companies Inc. and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People view the past year as a "start-up" period for the Fair Share Agreement, signed last summer in the wake of discrimination complaints against Denny's restaurants in Annapolis and San Jose, Calif.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | October 11, 1993
When the Rev. Benjamin F. Chavis Jr., executive director of the NAACP, sat down last week with Robert E. Allen, chairman of the talk went well beyond an embarrassing illustration in the company's employee magazine that Mr. Allen himself called "racist."Dr. Chavis pressed the chairman of the nation's largest long-distance carrier on issues such as the number of blacks in American Telephone & Telegraph Co. management and the company's dealings with African-American banks.It was an approach that has typified Dr. Chavis' first six months as the head of the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the country's largest and oldest civil rights group.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 16, 1993
INDIANAPOLIS -- With a rich legacy of achievement stretching from W. E. B. DuBois to Thurgood Marshall and beyond, the NAACP, which wrapped up its 84th annual convention here yesterday, appears to be a civil rights colossus.The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is, as speaker after speaker reminded the convention's 3,200 delegates, the nation's oldest and largest civil rights organization, with 2,200 branches and half a million members in all 50 states.But the NAACP is also an underfinanced, if exceptionally resilient, patchwork of volunteers that depends on the good will of aging civil rights warriors to do its grass-roots work.
NEWS
By DENTON L. WATSON | July 11, 1993
To some extent, the flap over the signing of a fair share agreement between the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and Richardson Sports/Carolinas Stadium Corporation recalls the uproar over the civil rights organization's adoption of an energy policy in 1976. The NAACP then was sharply criticized from within and without for straying too far from its original civil rights programs.The energy program was initiated in an attempt to give the NAACP a new look as much as to seek a new (some, excited by the idea, called it "sexy")
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | July 2, 1993
Fifty-three Denny's restaurants -- probably including the Annapolis Denny's where six black Secret Service officers claimed they were refused service this spring -- would become black-owned franchises by 1997 under an agreement signed in Baltimore yesterday between Flagstar Cos. Inc. and the NAACP.The agreement comes as Flagstar, a Spartanburg, S.C.-based corporation which has 120,000 employees in several restaurant groups, defends itself against several race-discrimination lawsuits filed against the Denny's chain.
NEWS
By DENTON L. WATSON | July 11, 1993
To some extent, the flap over the signing of a fair share agreement between the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and Richardson Sports/Carolinas Stadium Corporation recalls the uproar over the civil rights organization's adoption of an energy policy in 1976. The NAACP then was sharply criticized from within and without for straying too far from its original civil rights programs.The energy program was initiated in an attempt to give the NAACP a new look as much as to seek a new (some, excited by the idea, called it "sexy")
NEWS
By Jeff Leeds and Jeff Leeds,Contributing Writer | July 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The owner of Denny's, under attack for allegedly discriminating against black customers, will sign an agreement today in Baltimore allowing the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to conduct random tests of the company's four restaurant chains for racial bias.Under the sweeping seven-year accord, Flagstar Corp., which owns 2,320 restaurants internationally -- including Denny's, Hardee's, Quincy's Steakhouse and El Pollo Loco -- will increase minority involvement in company management and in restaurant hiring and contracting.
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