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Flag House Courts

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NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
It was a good day.Big speakers boomed the bass of music -- sometimes live,sometimes off the radio. The sun beamed brightly despite predictions of cloudy skies. Pineapple and orange snowballs awaited those seeking a cool remedy. Hot dogs sizzled on the grill.And smiles sparkled in conversation.The old stony, weed-ridden playground in the middle of Flag House Courts was the center of celebration yesterday afternoon as about 300 residents and a few city officials toasted with canned drinks to the recent rejuvenation of one of Baltimore's most squalid housing developments.
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NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2001
The demolition yesterday of Flag House Courts took only seconds, but for former tenants of the East Baltimore public housing site, the event symbolized years - in some cases decades - of a way of life that many now say never should have been. With the controlled collapse of Flag House Courts' three 13-story buildings, Baltimore became the first major U.S. city to tear down all its high-rise public housing complexes for families. Last year, then-U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Andrew M. Cuomo said in a speech here that the high-rises "should never have been built."
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NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | May 10, 1993
The elevator shook to a stop and Andrea "Piper" Horton, 6 and her 4-year-old sister, Erica, found themselves staring at a wall. They were stuck between floors.Not knowing what to do, Andrea helped lower her younger sister to the floor below. But as she tried to get out, she slipped and plunged more than eight stories down the shaft."I thought I was going to die," she recalls.Andrea fell on a bed of trash, lucky to escape only with bruises and a back injury in that 1987 incident. But it illustrates the dangers residents face daily at Baltimore's Flag House Courts public housing project.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2001
ON SATURDAY morning, the Flag House Courts public housing complex will no longer exist. In not much more time than it takes to read a couple of paragraphs of this column, the three towers on the edge of Little Italy that for decades have housed hundreds of families will collapse into a heap of dust and rubble -- the last of the city's four family high-rise complexes to be toppled under a federal program to replace dilapidated buildings with viable communities....
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Staff Writer | July 21, 1993
Municipal and Housing Authority workers and police swept through another East Baltimore public housing high-rise building yesterday in an effort to rid the residence of grime and crime.Wearing white hard hats, about 350 workers from 10 city agencies descended on the 12-story building at 26 S. Exeter St. at 9 a.m. and started hammering, sawing, painting and landscaping the grounds under the Extraordinary Comprehensive Housekeeping Operation, or ECHO.The Housing Authority of Baltimore City has now conducted ECHO sweeps at all three high-rise buildings at the Flag House Courts public housing complex at a cost of $200,000 for each sweep.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Staff Writer | December 9, 1992
Baltimore Housing Authority police made another sweep through a public high-rise complex yesterday, seizing drug materials and arresting seven people who were illegally "squatting" in apartments.Armed as in past sweeps with semiautomatic weapons, about two dozen police officers unlocked doors of 41 supposedly vacant apartments in the Flag House Courts development just east of downtown.Inside, they found not only squatters but also "a host of drug paraphernalia, including syringes and empty vials," said Bill Toohey, a Housing Authority spokesman.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2001
They're calling it an "implosion." But is that really the right term for Saturday's planned demolition of East Baltimore's old Flag House Courts housing project? The demise of the city's last public family housing high-rise invites the question. Spectators might be surprised that the answer is not exactly what they think they see when explosives are detonated. "Of course, it's not an implosion," says Nick Jones, chairman of the civil engineering department at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | June 7, 1993
Long hidden by thick layers of grime, the metal strips separating the marble tiles in the lobby at 107 S. Albemarle St. glistened yesterday. Flowers bloomed in the newly landscaped front yard. And for the first time in years, residents walked the building's stairways without fear of encountering outlaws brandishing guns.Nearly a week after more than 350 workers launched a crash cleanup at the Flag House Courts public housing high-rise and officials instituted new security procedures, most residents were astounded by the impact.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
Evelyn Scipio moved to East Baltimore's Flag House Courts public housing project 30 years ago, a time when a move to the then-sparkling complex was seen as a step up for the poor but hopeful families that lived there.Ms. Scipio reared five children at Flag. Photos of them and her seven grandchildren are proudly displayed on her coffeetable. Her youngest daughter, Robin Parke, 34, a state employee, visits her mother at Flag a couple times a week, and over time has grown increasingly distressed at her old neighborhood's deterioration.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2001
The demolition yesterday of Flag House Courts took only seconds, but for former tenants of the East Baltimore public housing site, the event symbolized years - in some cases decades - of a way of life that many now say never should have been. With the controlled collapse of Flag House Courts' three 13-story buildings, Baltimore became the first major U.S. city to tear down all its high-rise public housing complexes for families. Last year, then-U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Andrew M. Cuomo said in a speech here that the high-rises "should never have been built."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2001
They're calling it an "implosion." But is that really the right term for Saturday's planned demolition of East Baltimore's old Flag House Courts housing project? The demise of the city's last public family housing high-rise invites the question. Spectators might be surprised that the answer is not exactly what they think they see when explosives are detonated. "Of course, it's not an implosion," says Nick Jones, chairman of the civil engineering department at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2001
THE COMMUNITY that is planned to replace the Flag House Courts public housing complex in East Baltimore has won national recognition as an example of successful urban design. An American Institute of Architects jury chose the 338-unit development as one of four projects that will receive Honor Awards for outstanding regional and urban design during the AIA's annual convention in Denver in May. City officials have set Feb. 10 as the date when contractors will demolish the vacant public housing complex to make way for the replacement community, which will contain housing, commercial space and a community center.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1998
City housing officials have chosen a team that includes the nation's largest African-American construction company to redevelop the Flag House Courts housing project.H. J. Russell & Co., an Atlanta company with annual sales of $155 million, is one of three companies that formed Flag House Courts LLC. The other principal companies are Integral Group LLC of Atlanta, a minority-owned development company, and Mid City Urban LLC, of Bethesda, a developer of housing for low- and moderate-income people.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
Evelyn Scipio moved to East Baltimore's Flag House Courts public housing project 30 years ago, a time when a move to the then-sparkling complex was seen as a step up for the poor but hopeful families that lived there.Ms. Scipio reared five children at Flag. Photos of them and her seven grandchildren are proudly displayed on her coffeetable. Her youngest daughter, Robin Parke, 34, a state employee, visits her mother at Flag a couple times a week, and over time has grown increasingly distressed at her old neighborhood's deterioration.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | November 1, 1993
The Girl Scouts met for the first time in years recently at the Flag House Courts public housing project. And last week, 16 Flag youngsters attended a Boy Scout meeting, hoping to re-energize a troop that was inactive for months.On Saturdays, dozens of Flag children take part in Bible study classes. And yesterday, the council threw a big Halloween party, complete with a haunted house and goodie bags, for Flag's children.These staples of community life had been all but stamped out at the East Baltimore public housing project by open drug dealing, rampant violence and Housing Authority neglect when The Sun ran a series of stories on Flag in May.Those problems profoundly altered the rhythms of life for residents of Flag.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Staff Writer | July 21, 1993
Municipal and Housing Authority workers and police swept through another East Baltimore public housing high-rise building yesterday in an effort to rid the residence of grime and crime.Wearing white hard hats, about 350 workers from 10 city agencies descended on the 12-story building at 26 S. Exeter St. at 9 a.m. and started hammering, sawing, painting and landscaping the grounds under the Extraordinary Comprehensive Housekeeping Operation, or ECHO.The Housing Authority of Baltimore City has now conducted ECHO sweeps at all three high-rise buildings at the Flag House Courts public housing complex at a cost of $200,000 for each sweep.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1998
City housing officials have chosen a team that includes the nation's largest African-American construction company to redevelop the Flag House Courts housing project.H. J. Russell & Co., an Atlanta company with annual sales of $155 million, is one of three companies that formed Flag House Courts LLC. The other principal companies are Integral Group LLC of Atlanta, a minority-owned development company, and Mid City Urban LLC, of Bethesda, a developer of housing for low- and moderate-income people.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Michael A. Fletcher and Melody Simmons and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writers | June 2, 1993
In a dramatic effort to sweep away peoblems plaguing East Baltimore's Flag House Courts, an army of police and maintenance workers descended on a high-rise at the housing project yesterday to evict squatters and drug dealers and to give the building a fresh coat of paint, clean stairwells and even plant a flower garden.Operation ECHO, which stands for Extraordinary Comprehensive Housekeeping Operation, started at 9 a.m. when 42 city police officers joined 30 Housing Authority police officers at 107 S. Albemarle St. to inspect the building's 118 units for illegal tenants.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
It was a good day.Big speakers boomed the bass of music -- sometimes live,sometimes off the radio. The sun beamed brightly despite predictions of cloudy skies. Pineapple and orange snowballs awaited those seeking a cool remedy. Hot dogs sizzled on the grill.And smiles sparkled in conversation.The old stony, weed-ridden playground in the middle of Flag House Courts was the center of celebration yesterday afternoon as about 300 residents and a few city officials toasted with canned drinks to the recent rejuvenation of one of Baltimore's most squalid housing developments.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | June 7, 1993
Long hidden by thick layers of grime, the metal strips separating the marble tiles in the lobby at 107 S. Albemarle St. glistened yesterday. Flowers bloomed in the newly landscaped front yard. And for the first time in years, residents walked the building's stairways without fear of encountering outlaws brandishing guns.Nearly a week after more than 350 workers launched a crash cleanup at the Flag House Courts public housing high-rise and officials instituted new security procedures, most residents were astounded by the impact.
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