Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFlag Desecration
IN THE NEWS

Flag Desecration

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 10, 1999
AGAIN, CONGRESS is moving toward a constitutional ban on desecration of the U.S. flag.Not a burning issue, you say?Perhaps that's because instances of flag desecration are so rare -- fewer than 50 since 1777, by one count.Yet, to outlaw so uncommon an offense, proponents of a constitutional amendment would place limits on the First Amendment -- a very bad idea that has a troubling amount of support in the 106th Congress.On an emotional level, it's easy to understand why so many lawmakers have lined up to be co-sponsors of the proposed amendment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
August 31, 2011
The 1989 Texas v. Johnson case invalidated laws against flag desecration in 48 states and the District of Columbia. The American Legion and veterans everywhere were outraged that the court, in a 5-4 ruling, took away a fundamental right of the people to protect their flag - a right possessed since the birth of this nation. For 17 years, the American Legion and the Citizens Flag Alliance, a coalition of more than 140 organizations, have championed the passage of a narrowly drawn Constitutional amendment that would return to the people the right to protect Old Glory.
Advertisement
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- For the third time in the past seven years, Congress will try again to make it an offense against the Constitution to deface the American flag.Tomorrow, the House will take up a proposed constitutional amendment to outlaw "physical desecration" of the nation's most conspicuous symbol. While the proposal is likely to sail through the House, it appears to be a few votes short of the two-thirds majority it would need for adoption by the Senate.Even if it stumbles in the Senate, the amendment will stir anew what has become a fiery biennial debate between some flag-waving patriots and civil libertarians.
NEWS
July 4, 2006
Senators out of step on flag amendment As could have been expected, Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes voted in lockstep with the liberal wing of the Democratic Party to help kill the flag-burning amendment by single vote ("By one vote, Senate rejects flag measure," June 28). In so doing, they once again dismissed the views of the majority of mainstream Marylanders. How out of step are our two Senators? Consider: Forty-eight states had outlawed flag desecration before the 1989 Supreme Court ruling invalidated a Texas law that did so. All 50 state legislatures have passed resolutions urging Congress to approve a constitutional amendment prohibiting flag desecration.
NEWS
By Cynthia H. Cho and Cynthia H. Cho,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - The House approved yesterday, for the sixth time since 1995, a constitutional amendment that would allow Congress to prohibit the physical desecration of the American flag. The measure now goes to the Senate, which has consistently rejected similar proposals. But this year, supporters and opponents of the amendment say that passage in the Senate could be extremely close - within a vote or two. Proposed amendments to the Constitution need approval by two-thirds of the House and the Senate before being sent to the states for ratification.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES Sun staff writer Brad Snyder contributed to this article | December 13, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Senate narrowly rejected a proposed constitutional amendment yesterday that would give Congress the right to enact laws prohibiting desecration of the American flag.The 63-36 vote in favor of the amendment fell three votes shy of the required two-thirds majority.The measure's floor sponsor, Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Orrin G. Hatch, a Utah Republican, blamed President Clinton for its defeat."Had the president supported this amendment, I have no doubt" it would have won Senate approval, he said.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 3, 1995
Letter, calls and the roar of the crowd:R. E. Johnson, Glen Burnie: The flag of America is a piece of cloth. It is ink printed on paper. It is an image on a TV screen or theater screen. All these things it is.Your column of March 8 is symbolic of the mentality of a generation that has gotten off the elevator before reaching the main floor.Your rambling narrative and overtly stupid rationale doesn't cut it. Before you make your own "journalistic law," perhaps you will note the attached copy of the "Code of Ethics for Display and Use of the American Flag."
NEWS
July 28, 1998
A letter to the editor on Tuesday incorrectly mentioned the Falls Road SPCA when it should have said the Baltimore Animal Shelter.The Sun regrets the errors.Save a dog from euthanasia and find a good pet at SPCAThree months ago we adopted Samantha, our dog, from the Falls Road Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. When my mom picked her up, her hair was matted, and she was not very attractive. And because of her appearance, many people passed her by. She has turned out to be a sweet, affectionate and lovable family member.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | August 1, 1995
ALL OF those folks in Washington who are eager to adopt a constitutional amendment on flag desecration run into problems defining what such an amendment would cover. For example, would bathing suits featuring the stars and stripes be considered a desecration of the country's symbol?They should have lived in Baltimore in the 1930s when a certain no-nonsense, respect-for-the-flag zealot was very much a public figure.Her name was Ella Virginia Houck Holloway. She was born at 10 Front St. in 1862 (next door to the Shot Tower)
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Sun Staff Writer | July 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- On Capitol Hill, Congress considers a constitutional amendment to protect the flag. Around the country, civil libertarians fret that free speech will suffer. In the nation's capital, Floyd Smith and his crew at the National Park Service quietly, respectfully go about their business.In their green-and-gray uniforms, they are the people responsible for keeping the flags flying over the Park Service's capital monuments.The crew replaces the flags that fray in the wind. They lower the flags to half-staff when a dignitary dies or national tragedies prompt a period of mourning.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The first time the Supreme Court weighed in on desecration of the American flag, the subject was beer. The court held that states could outlaw flags on bottles of Stars and Stripes beer because such marketing would "degrade and cheapen" the flag. That was 1907. Eighty-two years later, in 1989, the court ruled that the constitutional right to free speech permitted the flag to be desecrated, even by burning it. Majorities in the Senate and the House of Representatives have been trying to turn back the clock ever since.
NEWS
By Cynthia H. Cho and Cynthia H. Cho,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 23, 2005
WASHINGTON - The House approved yesterday, for the sixth time since 1995, a constitutional amendment that would allow Congress to prohibit the physical desecration of the American flag. The measure now goes to the Senate, which has consistently rejected similar proposals. But this year, supporters and opponents of the amendment say that passage in the Senate could be extremely close - within a vote or two. Proposed amendments to the Constitution need approval by two-thirds of the House and the Senate before being sent to the states for ratification.
NEWS
April 10, 1999
AGAIN, CONGRESS is moving toward a constitutional ban on desecration of the U.S. flag.Not a burning issue, you say?Perhaps that's because instances of flag desecration are so rare -- fewer than 50 since 1777, by one count.Yet, to outlaw so uncommon an offense, proponents of a constitutional amendment would place limits on the First Amendment -- a very bad idea that has a troubling amount of support in the 106th Congress.On an emotional level, it's easy to understand why so many lawmakers have lined up to be co-sponsors of the proposed amendment.
NEWS
July 28, 1998
A letter to the editor on Tuesday incorrectly mentioned the Falls Road SPCA when it should have said the Baltimore Animal Shelter.The Sun regrets the errors.Save a dog from euthanasia and find a good pet at SPCAThree months ago we adopted Samantha, our dog, from the Falls Road Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. When my mom picked her up, her hair was matted, and she was not very attractive. And because of her appearance, many people passed her by. She has turned out to be a sweet, affectionate and lovable family member.
NEWS
July 12, 1997
FOR MORE THAN two centuries the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution have been celebrated as the Bill of Rights. Their provisions offer both a protection of American rights and liberties and a symbol of those liberties.But liberty is not always popular, as illustrated by efforts to outlaw desecration of the American flag.Burning or otherwise insulting an American flag is offensive to citizens, especially so to those who have risked their lives defending this country. And yet the Constitution is clear: Americans have the right to be angry with their country's government, and to express that anger in symbolic ways.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- For the third time in the past seven years, Congress will try again to make it an offense against the Constitution to deface the American flag.Tomorrow, the House will take up a proposed constitutional amendment to outlaw "physical desecration" of the nation's most conspicuous symbol. While the proposal is likely to sail through the House, it appears to be a few votes short of the two-thirds majority it would need for adoption by the Senate.Even if it stumbles in the Senate, the amendment will stir anew what has become a fiery biennial debate between some flag-waving patriots and civil libertarians.
NEWS
June 30, 2005
Common sense on height limits finally emerges Finally, some common sense on height limits in Mount Vernon: Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP) rebuffs the developers by supporting height limits that would preserve the character of Mount Vernon ("Severe height restrictions urged for new Mount Vernon projects," June 28). It seems that CHAP recognizes that buildings up to 230 feet tall would destroy Mount Vernon, a community made up mainly of three- to four-story townhouses built in the mid- to late 19th century.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.