Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFlag Burning
IN THE NEWS

Flag Burning

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Linda R. Monk | June 14, 1999
TODAY is Flag Day, and the American Legion will be celebrating the occasion by burning flags -- old ones, put to death respectfully, of course. Still, it's more than a little ironic that the organization spearheading the movement for a constitutional amendment to prohibit flag burning marks Flag Day with a bonfire.The proposed Flag Protection Amendment is just a few votes shy of the necessary two-thirds majority in the Senate -- the stumbling block in past attempts, not an easy rollover like the House.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | April 25, 2008
In a speech before more than 1,000 law students and attorneys at Baltimore's Lyric Opera House yesterday, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia set out to dispel the notion that his judicial philosophy always leads him to ultra-conservative opinions. He pointed to an instance where he agreed that flag burning was a form of protected and legal speech. Scalia said the morning after the court's opinion was announced, his "very conservative" wife began humming You're a Grand Old Flag over breakfast as a form of protest.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | January 18, 1991
Nine high school students at Baltimore City College were still on suspension today for burning a U.S. flag in the school courtyard to protest the war against Iraq.The flag-burning took place shortly after noon yesterday outside the school cafeteria. The nine students, all 10th-, 11th- or 12th-graders, were placed on "disciplinary removal" for endangering other students and participating in an unauthorized activity on school property.Disciplinary removal is the least severe form of suspension and can result in the students' being out of school for up to three days.
NEWS
By PAUL TAYLOR and PAUL TAYLOR,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2006
About two in three Americans fly the flag. Nearly three in four say flag burning should be illegal. Roughly half say it should be unconstitutional. But despite these protective instincts, there's been no public clamor demanding that Congress take steps to defend Old Glory against desecrators. These mixed feelings were reflected in the U.S. Senate's defeat last week of a proposed constitutional amendment barring the desecration of the American flag, the latest chapter in a decades-old legal and political debate over the flag.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | July 19, 1995
If we ranked national problems on a scale of 1 to 10,000, flag burning would be about a 2.It's a bit more serious than the high cost of beluga caviar or the growing practice of putting ketchup on hot dogs. But it isn't quite as troubling as dope smuggling, street crime, cancer, rising health costs, the tax laws, or even mosquito bites, double parking, cat-hair allergies and post-nasal drip.However, it is the nature of many politicians to seek the approval of those who believe our stability and greatness as a nation is threatened if some geek with skinny arms and a jiggly Adam's apple phones a TV station to announce that he will flick his Bic lighter at a Taiwan-made banner.
NEWS
June 26, 1999
MEMBERS of the U.S. Senate who may be wavering on whether to vote for the proposed flag-burning amendment would be well advised to remember what that flag symbolizes.Freedom of speech -- even objectionable and obnoxious expression, to be sure. So, to pass the amendment would be to agree to place limits on the First Amendment.The flag also represents acceptance of certain other values. Among those is respect for a Constitution that has served this country well and, therefore, should not be amended any and every time there's a Supreme Court decision that's unpopular in some circles.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- For the second time in two years, the House approved by a lopsided margin a popular but controversial proposal that would amend the Constitution to outlaw burning of the American flag.Despite the 310-114 vote, comfortably more than the two-thirds required for constitutional amendments, proponents of the measure acknowledged that they face an uphill struggle against Americans who consider burning Old Glory a form of protected speech."If we can just pick up three extra votes in the Senate, then we'll be on our way," Republican Rep. Gerald B. H. Solomon of New York told a group of veterans and other amendment supporters.
NEWS
By David Kelly and David Kelly,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 21, 2003
FRISCO, Colo. - Ask people here about the flag on the mountain and they may shake their heads, grimace or just walk away. But they all want to know why. "No one can believe it," said Wayne Sharrar, owner of Ol' Time Barber Shop on Main Street. "Whoever did it was a coward." His client Gary Severson frowned. "It's deplorable," he said. Last weekend, the enormous American flag, fluttering atop a local mountain to commemorate the victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks, was slashed with knives and torched.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - A constitutional amendment that would allow Congress to ban flag-burning sailed through the House of Representatives for the fifth time yesterday and now moves to the Senate where supporters say a national wave of patriotism gives the measure a fighting chance. The House voted 300-125 to approve the flag amendment, and supporters, mostly Republicans and veterans groups, are mobilizing to push it through the Senate before Flag Day on June 14, or the Fourth of July. President Bush has endorsed the amendment.
NEWS
July 5, 1991
Well, another glorious Fourth has come and gone, and despite all the doomsayers who predicted the country would go to hell in a handbasket if Old Glory were not protected by a constitutional amendment to prohibit flag-burning, we saw no flags ablaze yesterday, but hundreds and thousands of flags flying -- just as they were intended to be. The Republic survived another birthday.
NEWS
By JILL ZUCKMAN and JILL ZUCKMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 8, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Conservative Republicans in the Senate overwhelmingly failed in their effort yesterday to amend the Constitution to ban gay marriage and require all states to recognize the institution solely as the union between a man and a woman. The vote was the first in a set designed to fire up the party's conservative base in advance of the November congressional elections. Senators immediately turned to a debate over eliminating the estate tax and plan to move shortly after that to a proposed constitutional amendment prohibiting flag burning.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | July 4, 2005
ATLANTA - Just as you might expect, a group of finger-to-the-wind conservative congressmen have pledged to fight for legislation that would allow the Ten Commandments to be posted in courthouses around the country. Two recent Supreme Court decisions - one of which struck down such displays - has handed them a chance to seize the low ground on yet another controversial issue. These are the same congressmen, no doubt, who roar with approval every time President Bush pledges that the United States will help Iraqis install their own version of Jeffersonian democracy - one that protects government critics, religious minorities and criminal defendants.
NEWS
June 27, 2005
THE IMAGE of an American flag burned in protest is deeply offensive to many in this country. The Stars and Stripes carries too much meaning for its desecration not to cause that reaction; that's why protestors burn it. It's a questionable tactic (and so standard a practice in some parts of the world, one wonders why they bother). Who is persuaded by such lunacy? It's a sign of fanaticism, and its practitioners gain little from the exercise. But Congress seems intent on making matters far worse.
NEWS
By David Kelly and David Kelly,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 21, 2003
FRISCO, Colo. - Ask people here about the flag on the mountain and they may shake their heads, grimace or just walk away. But they all want to know why. "No one can believe it," said Wayne Sharrar, owner of Ol' Time Barber Shop on Main Street. "Whoever did it was a coward." His client Gary Severson frowned. "It's deplorable," he said. Last weekend, the enormous American flag, fluttering atop a local mountain to commemorate the victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks, was slashed with knives and torched.
NEWS
June 8, 2003
School reforms shouldn't curtail access to arts While we applaud the decision to strengthen academic rigor in the middle grades, we hope that the arts are not shortchanged in the process ("Middle schools reform planned," June 2). Both research and experience, especially in poor urban schools, show that art, dance, music and drama actually enhance student motivation and achievement when integrated into the academic program. In addition, the arts teach students important concepts such as hard work, continuous improvement and respect for diversity.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - A constitutional amendment that would allow Congress to ban flag-burning sailed through the House of Representatives for the fifth time yesterday and now moves to the Senate where supporters say a national wave of patriotism gives the measure a fighting chance. The House voted 300-125 to approve the flag amendment, and supporters, mostly Republicans and veterans groups, are mobilizing to push it through the Senate before Flag Day on June 14, or the Fourth of July. President Bush has endorsed the amendment.
NEWS
By PAUL TAYLOR and PAUL TAYLOR,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2006
About two in three Americans fly the flag. Nearly three in four say flag burning should be illegal. Roughly half say it should be unconstitutional. But despite these protective instincts, there's been no public clamor demanding that Congress take steps to defend Old Glory against desecrators. These mixed feelings were reflected in the U.S. Senate's defeat last week of a proposed constitutional amendment barring the desecration of the American flag, the latest chapter in a decades-old legal and political debate over the flag.
NEWS
June 27, 2005
THE IMAGE of an American flag burned in protest is deeply offensive to many in this country. The Stars and Stripes carries too much meaning for its desecration not to cause that reaction; that's why protestors burn it. It's a questionable tactic (and so standard a practice in some parts of the world, one wonders why they bother). Who is persuaded by such lunacy? It's a sign of fanaticism, and its practitioners gain little from the exercise. But Congress seems intent on making matters far worse.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
After watching news reports this week of protesters overseas burning American flags, Timothy Garress said he thought he was dreaming when he looked out his window and saw a neighbor's flag smoldering on the ground. Not in America, he thought. And certainly not in the Laurel Valley section of Abingdon. But what Garress saw was no dream. The flag was one of 25 set afire early yesterday in the neighborhood. By some accounts, all but two flags displayed in front of homes on Laurel Valley Garth, St. Mary's Church Road and Long Meadow and Laurel Valley courts were burned.
NEWS
By R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr | June 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - Perhaps I have been guilty of a failing that Alexis de Tocqueville warned against in his 1835 prescient guide to America through the ages, "Democracy in America." He warned that our democracy was most likely to breed "general apathy." Quite possibly, I have been apathetic about the fragile condition of freedom in our time. I took it for granted that my fellow Americans relished their freedoms and would defend them. To be sure, we have accepted the government's incursions into our ability to earn incomes free from onerous taxation.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.