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NEWS
July 11, 1995
Now it is up to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke.A committee he appointed to recommend changes in the Baltimore Development Corp. has prepared an explosive draft report that prompted a case of jitters at City Hall. It is easy to see why.Although compiled by developers friendly toward Mr. Schmoke, the report harshly criticizes Baltimore's economic development efforts during his eight years in office."BDC is a reactive organization relying on crisis management as contrasted with a focused entity operating within a clear strategic framework," the report says, adding: "Some of BDC's professional staff lacks necessary qualifications for economic development work."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
The cost to transform an underused bar into a buzzing hotspot is not cheap. But as the saying goes, when you pay for quality, you only cry once. Just ask Boathouse Canton co-owner Gene Singleton. He confirmed last week that the top-to-bottom renovations made to the former Bay Cafe (which closed in December after more than two decades of business) came with a $1.1 million price tag. For a guy helping to foot such a bill, Singleton sure sounded happy about Boathouse Canton. (He and his wife, Maureen McEnerney, took control in January and opened the restaurant in mid-April.)
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BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair | July 13, 2008
Our 60-year-old house, which we've been slowly renovating, contains a guest bathroom that's in need of new wall tiles. The original floor, still in place, consists of the small black-and-white tiles that were the norm back in the '40s. And you can guess what color all the fixtures are. We'd like to retain the style that the homebuilders chose for this small but functional bathroom, even though it's kind of dull. Can you suggest ways of introducing a bit of visual fizz without altering the basic design?
NEWS
December 4, 2013
Crosswalks, unless you happen to be on Abbey Road, tend to be boring. But now the folks at the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts are livening up crosswalks near the historic Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower in the city's newest arts and entertainment district. Baltimore artist Graham Coreil-Allen designed four hopscotch courts in crosswalks at Eutaw and Lombard streets that were unveiled last week. Coreil-Allen, who creates art in public places, also created an installation in Waverly called Tinges Commons and, earlier this fall, led tours of "invisible sites and overlooked architectural and psychic features" in Station North.
FEATURES
By Brad Barnes and Brad Barnes,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 12, 2002
The Backstreet Boys are apparently content to ride in the back seat for a while. 'N Sync might be permanently out of sync, with Justin Timberlake going solo. But just when you might be tempted to write off all the boy bands to puberty, in comes B2K. The group is younger and more playful than the others. It's arguably closer to R&B's roots - hey, they're black. And when B2K's album debuted eight months ago, it came roaring out with record sales and radio play. A Christmas album, Santa Hooked Me Up, came out in October.
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt | June 9, 1996
A roundup of new products and servicesKeeping the FizzIf your last party lost its fizz -- literally -- invite the Incredible Soda Machine to your next one. The machine screws onto any threaded 1- or 2-liter soda bottle and uses pressure from the soda's own carbonation to dispense the liquid. At the push of a button, out comes soda that remains fizzy to the last drop. There's no more problem of having soda go flat in the bottle after a portion of it has been poured out. To order the Incredible Soda Machine, call (800)
FEATURES
By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | March 21, 1992
&TC Normally, when a TV series is nudged out of its time slot by a ratings-hungry network, the shrieks of discontent are piercing.Nothing, short of bad execution, can bury a series faster than shuffling the nightly lineup. It causes confusion on the part of the viewer and heartburn for the producers.But in the case of "Homefront," the ABC series about the post-World War II years in middle America, the change from Tuesday nights to Wednesdays has been as soothing as an effervescent elixir.
NEWS
January 13, 1995
HAVE you been wondering where the zip in life has gone? Ponder these thoughts from "Just Say No to 'No'," by Tony Hendra, in the November issue of GQ:"What did the Fifties, that economic Eden we're all trying to get back to, have that we don't have? People drank at lunch."Our economy revolves around lunch. Lunch, for the early-jogging hard charger, is the first meal of the day. Appetites sharpen; greed is at its peak."People make deals at lunch because they're hungry."But mere deals are not enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
The cost to transform an underused bar into a buzzing hotspot is not cheap. But as the saying goes, when you pay for quality, you only cry once. Just ask Boathouse Canton co-owner Gene Singleton. He confirmed last week that the top-to-bottom renovations made to the former Bay Cafe (which closed in December after more than two decades of business) came with a $1.1 million price tag. For a guy helping to foot such a bill, Singleton sure sounded happy about Boathouse Canton. (He and his wife, Maureen McEnerney, took control in January and opened the restaurant in mid-April.)
NEWS
December 4, 2013
Crosswalks, unless you happen to be on Abbey Road, tend to be boring. But now the folks at the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts are livening up crosswalks near the historic Bromo Seltzer Arts Tower in the city's newest arts and entertainment district. Baltimore artist Graham Coreil-Allen designed four hopscotch courts in crosswalks at Eutaw and Lombard streets that were unveiled last week. Coreil-Allen, who creates art in public places, also created an installation in Waverly called Tinges Commons and, earlier this fall, led tours of "invisible sites and overlooked architectural and psychic features" in Station North.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
Crosswalks, unless you happen to be on Abbey Road, tend to be boring.  Until last week, the most exciting thing you'll see in a Baltimore crosswalk is an occasional Toynbee tile. But now the folks at the Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts are livening up crosswalks near the historic Bromo Seltzer Tower in the city's newest Arts and Entertainment district.  Baltimore artist Graham Coreil-Allen painted a hopscotch court in a crosswalk at Eutaw and Lombard Streets that was unveiled today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | April 23, 2013
There are those times in life in which a name doesn't necessarily meet reality, when a book defies its cover, if you will. And in the world of cocktails, this is no exception. A Boxcar tastes nothing like an actual boxcar. A Cape Cod? Tastes nothing like a beach. And in our case, the Inner Harbor's Sullivan's Steakhouse has a cocktail whose name and ingredients might throw you for a loop: the Thai Basil Fizz. The Thai Basil Fizz, though it sounds rather robust from its ingredients list including black pepper, Thai basil and prosecco, is almost like a fizzy whiskey sour - sans whiskey of course, with Tito's Vodka in its place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | May 29, 2012
Creamy orange sherbet for breakfast? And it's spiked with gin? And it's good for you? Langermann's in Canton wants to make your dream come true with their take on a true classic, The Ramos Gin Fizz. There's only one, eye-opening catch: It's made with a healthy, fortifying portion of … egg whites. Yes, the same homogenized egg whites that go into your omelet can also get you drunk. But before you say "gross!" there has to be a reason it's lasted for so long, right? The Ramos Fizz was invented in the late 1800s by H.C. Ramos in New Orleans, but Langermann's managing partner David McGill first tasted the drink while in San Francisco, where the Fizz continues to be a standard brunch offering.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | December 14, 2011
Evoking family nostalgia with a little sparkle, the Concord Fizz at Timonium's Five: A Martini Bar, adjacent to and owned by the Christopher Daniel restaurant, is a punchy drink for the holiday season. Add in rosemary, a key ingredient to this grape- and gin-based cocktail and you even get the Christmas tree. Bar manager Eric Myers found inspiration for this unique martini in an unlikely place. "I've wanted to use grapes in a drink forever. I remembered loving my grandmother's grape jelly meatballs with rosemary; the two played really well off of each other.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair | July 13, 2008
Our 60-year-old house, which we've been slowly renovating, contains a guest bathroom that's in need of new wall tiles. The original floor, still in place, consists of the small black-and-white tiles that were the norm back in the '40s. And you can guess what color all the fixtures are. We'd like to retain the style that the homebuilders chose for this small but functional bathroom, even though it's kind of dull. Can you suggest ways of introducing a bit of visual fizz without altering the basic design?
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN REPORTER | July 24, 2007
Dr. Ramachandran Vasan and colleagues pored over the health records of thousands of patients and deduced this: People of middle age who drank as little as one soda a day - diet or regular - had at least a 40 percent greater chance of developing risk factors for heart disease than abstainers. Vasan had expected a link between heart health risk and sugar-sweetened, high-calorie drinks. But the diet soda findings puzzled him. So the researchers called for more study when they published their findings yesterday in Circulation, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | December 14, 2011
Evoking family nostalgia with a little sparkle, the Concord Fizz at Timonium's Five: A Martini Bar, adjacent to and owned by the Christopher Daniel restaurant, is a punchy drink for the holiday season. Add in rosemary, a key ingredient to this grape- and gin-based cocktail and you even get the Christmas tree. Bar manager Eric Myers found inspiration for this unique martini in an unlikely place. "I've wanted to use grapes in a drink forever. I remembered loving my grandmother's grape jelly meatballs with rosemary; the two played really well off of each other.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN COLUMNIST | July 19, 1999
I feel like a kid again. I am drinking a soda made the old-fashioned way -- with a spritz of vanilla, a squirt of cola and a healthy dose of fizzy water.The handmade fountain soda at Durding's Store in Rock Hall takes me back to my childhood. I feel an urge to shoot the paper cover of my straw toward the ceiling and order a cherry Coke and then a root beer float.I restrain myself. I already have downed a thick chocolate malt at the 127-year-old corner store and former pharmacy in the Upper Eastern Shore town.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | March 18, 2007
Can Coca-Cola Co. put two years of good stock performance together? What is the outlook for my shares? - R.M., via the Internet These are the times that try colas' souls. The U.S. market for carbonated soft drinks declined 0.6 percent in 2006, with Coke's soft-drink volume down 1.2 percent, according to Beverage Digest. Enter Diet Coke Plus. Fortified with niacin, vitamins B6 and B12, magnesium and zinc, it is the company's latest effort to focus on the trend toward healthier beverages.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY AND JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and LIZ F. KAY AND JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTERS | May 4, 2006
America's largest beverage makers pledged yesterday to stop selling their signature sodas and other high-sugar drinks in the nation's schools as part of an agreement with health care groups who allege that soft drinks contribute to an epidemic of childhood obesity. The agreement permits only water, low-fat milk and unsweetened juice to be sold in elementary and middle schools - and only 8 ounces in elementary and 10 ounces in middle schools. High schools will have a little more leeway to stock as much as 12-ounce containers of juice, milk and sports drinks - but half the products must be low- or no-calorie.
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