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Fixed Price

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BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2002
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. asked state regulators yesterday to allow the utility to offer fixed-price contracts to its natural gas customers, triggering widespread anger from rival suppliers who said granting such a request would kill competition in the region. BGE told a meeting of the Maryland Public Service Commission and competitors that allowing customers to buy natural gas at a fixed price for a 12-month period would help stimulate the unregulated gas market. The utility also said the contracts would help shield consumers from price fluctuations that doubled or tripled energy bills in the winter of 2000-2001.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
Before Restaurant Week even begins each year, some Baltimore spots plan on extending their special fixed-price menus. That's not exactly a state secret. But sometimes a breakthrough gimmick, snowfall or an inspired Tweet compels a restaurant to extend its deal beyond the official Jan. 30 closing date. In the middle of Wednesday night's snowstorm, Blue Hill Tavern announced via Twitter and Facebook that it would extend its Restaurant Week deal for every inch of snow that fell.
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun reporter | September 29, 2006
The very plans Jim Schwartz had thought would save him money have ended up costing him more. Last month, the Sykesville resident, fearing further rises in heating oil prices, decided to lock in his price by signing on to a "fixed-price" plan with his oil provider. He'll pay $2.79 per gallon to heat his home this winter. "I saw nothing to tell me that current oil prices would drop," Schwartz said. "Better the known devil of $2.79." But oil prices have dropped, and that means Schwartz and others who have chosen similar plans will have to either pay above-market rates or pay their oil companies a cancellation fee. For Schwartz, the fee would be $99. As the price per barrel of crude oil dropped steadily in recent weeks, heating oil prices decreased, too. On Sept.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | August 29, 2009
Large supplies and the poor economy have pushed natural gas prices down to seven-year lows, which might prompt consumers to consider a fixed-price contract from an alternate supplier before the winter heating season begins - especially if they still remember last winter's sky-high bills, analysts say. But this year, consumers will be placing bets not only on the weather but also on how quickly the economy recovers. "There's the expectation that even a modest economic recovery will boost natural gas prices," said Addison Armstrong, director of market research for Tradition Energy.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
Last week, BGE posted the February "commodity" price for natural gas: 89.71 cents per therm. That's the cheapest for the standard BGE product since October 2007. The plunge in market energy costs is starting to show up in BGE's retail prices. Ninety cents per therm is 14 percent lower than BGE's December price and 43 percent lower than the high of $1.58 reached in July. (This is your raw fuel price. Delivery charges are added.) But the only BGE customers who will benefit from this plunge are those who didn't sign up for a fixed-price deal with a third-party supplier such as BGE Home (different from but related to BGE)
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | March 7, 1996
The state's hospital rate-setters yesterday approved a "fixed price" rate for normal births at St. Agnes Hospital.The decision gives St. Agnes essentially what it was seeking -- a second day in the hospital free for mothers and babies. It also gives the Health Services Cost Review Commission what it was seeking -- a reassertion that hospitals cannot offer discounts or special rates without commission approval.Responding to concerns that insurers were covering only 24-hour hospitalizations for normal births, St. Agnes announced Feb. 12 that it would offer a second day free to mothers and their babies.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | October 5, 1990
In some surrounding counties, it's like the good old days with cheap gas never ended.In Anne Arundel County, for example, the school system is in the final few months of a one-year contract for unleaded gasoline at about 59 cents a gallon and heating oil at 63 cents a gallon.The Baltimore County Public School system and government is running buses, cars and gasoline-powered trucks on fuel costing as little as 85 cents a gallon, thanks to some contracts it signed just before Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2001
GSE Systems Inc. of Columbia announced yesterday an offering for shareholders to buy additional shares at a fixed price as the company tries to raise $5.6 million in equity capital after losing money in a European venture this year. GSE, which makes simulation software for power plants and process control systems for manufacturers, said it will use the money to repay a loan from one of its major investors and for working capital, acquisitions, expenditures and general corporate purposes.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2002
Dear Mr. Azrael: Please inform me how I can raise a ground rent. The ground property I have is valued or was valued about 30 years ago to be $1,500 with a 6 percent rent of $90 per year as of when the house was sold. The house has been sold about three times as of this date. Mrs. Helen Zeller Baltimore Dear Ms. Zeller: The amount of the ground rent cannot be raised. The rental amount is fixed in the original ground rent lease, which normally provides that the term is for 99 years, renewable forever.
NEWS
May 5, 1993
With all the corporate tough talk about leaner and meaner productivity, mass layoffs and wage freezes, there's one group of employees whose compensation has mushroomed in spite of the recession: the executives who decide to make those cuts.The annual executive compensation survey by Business Week magazine showed the corporate captains of the 365 largest U.S. firms got an average $3.8 million in 1992, up 57 percent from 1991.Even more shocking, these chief executive officers' compensation averaged 157 times that of the average worker.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | February 8, 2009
Last week, BGE posted the February "commodity" price for natural gas: 89.71 cents per therm. That's the cheapest for the standard BGE product since October 2007. The plunge in market energy costs is starting to show up in BGE's retail prices. Ninety cents per therm is 14 percent lower than BGE's December price and 43 percent lower than the high of $1.58 reached in July. (This is your raw fuel price. Delivery charges are added.) But the only BGE customers who will benefit from this plunge are those who didn't sign up for a fixed-price deal with a third-party supplier such as BGE Home (different from but related to BGE)
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun reporter | September 29, 2006
The very plans Jim Schwartz had thought would save him money have ended up costing him more. Last month, the Sykesville resident, fearing further rises in heating oil prices, decided to lock in his price by signing on to a "fixed-price" plan with his oil provider. He'll pay $2.79 per gallon to heat his home this winter. "I saw nothing to tell me that current oil prices would drop," Schwartz said. "Better the known devil of $2.79." But oil prices have dropped, and that means Schwartz and others who have chosen similar plans will have to either pay above-market rates or pay their oil companies a cancellation fee. For Schwartz, the fee would be $99. As the price per barrel of crude oil dropped steadily in recent weeks, heating oil prices decreased, too. On Sept.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | January 28, 2006
It's a distressingly familiar scenario for homebuyers and refinancers, and was one of the major mortgage-related consumer complaints to federal agencies in 2005: "Good faith estimates" of settlement costs that turn out to be hundreds, even thousands, of dollars off the mark. Previously undisclosed charges for "processing," "administration" and other vague services mysteriously appear out of nowhere on the HUD-1 settlement form. What was estimated up front as $2,200 in total fees turns out instead to be $3,400 at the actual close of the transaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Langberg and Mike Langberg,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 27, 2003
Napster 2.0, the legitimate reincarnation of the outlaw music service shut down by the recording industry two years ago, tries to do so many things at once that it doesn't quite succeed at any of them. Launched Oct. 29, the new Napster (www.napster.com) is an upgrade of the music service previously called pressplay, which started in 2001 and was among the best of the early attempts to sell songs online. But standing still is dangerous in such a rapidly changing field, and Napster's kitty mascot has to contend with a new top cat in town: Apple Computer's elegant iTunes Music Store (www.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2002
Dear Mr. Azrael: Please inform me how I can raise a ground rent. The ground property I have is valued or was valued about 30 years ago to be $1,500 with a 6 percent rent of $90 per year as of when the house was sold. The house has been sold about three times as of this date. Mrs. Helen Zeller Baltimore Dear Ms. Zeller: The amount of the ground rent cannot be raised. The rental amount is fixed in the original ground rent lease, which normally provides that the term is for 99 years, renewable forever.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2002
Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. asked state regulators yesterday to allow the utility to offer fixed-price contracts to its natural gas customers, triggering widespread anger from rival suppliers who said granting such a request would kill competition in the region. BGE told a meeting of the Maryland Public Service Commission and competitors that allowing customers to buy natural gas at a fixed price for a 12-month period would help stimulate the unregulated gas market. The utility also said the contracts would help shield consumers from price fluctuations that doubled or tripled energy bills in the winter of 2000-2001.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | January 9, 1997
The state's hospital-rate setting commission decided yesterday to publish prices and terms of package deals negotiated between hospitals and insurers.Making the rates public, the regulators said, would ensure that all payers are treated fairly.Hospitals had objected to the proposal, saying publication would put them at a disadvantage with unregulated hospitals in nearby states and unregulated free-standing surgical centers."There isn't any competitive system I'm aware of where some competitors have to publish their rates and some don't," said Larry Lawrence, vice president of the Maryland Hospital Association, after the commission decision.
BUSINESS
By JANE BRYANT QUINN and JANE BRYANT QUINN,1993, Washington Post Writers Group | October 24, 1993
New York -- A small but growing number of auto dealers are picking up on "one-price" selling. That's the no-hassle way to buy. Each car in the showroom is ticketed at the dealer's best price. It may not always be the lowest price in town, but it's still pretty low, and you don't have to dicker in order to get it. So you don't have to wonder whether, with more nerve, you'd have gotten another $100 off.A survey last year by J.D. Power and Associates, a consulting firm, found that about 1,500 auto dealers engaged in one-price selling.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2001
GSE Systems Inc. of Columbia announced yesterday an offering for shareholders to buy additional shares at a fixed price as the company tries to raise $5.6 million in equity capital after losing money in a European venture this year. GSE, which makes simulation software for power plants and process control systems for manufacturers, said it will use the money to repay a loan from one of its major investors and for working capital, acquisitions, expenditures and general corporate purposes.
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