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Five Women

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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 15, 1994
WASHINGTON -- While most U.S. women like their jobs, they're stretched to the breaking point trying to juggle family, work, child care and other pressing concerns.That's the consensus from a first-of-its-kind survey of America's working women, distributed by the Women's Bureau of the Department of Labor. First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton joined Vice President Al Gore and Labor Secretary Robert B. Reich in a news conference yesterday to discuss survey results.More than 250,000 women responded to the "Working Women Count" survey, which polled women on issues such as equal pay, job advancement, and child and health care.
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NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
The father of a young Marine killed in Iraq wept repeatedly in federal court in Baltimore yesterday as a jury watched video images of members of a Kansas church protesting the military's inclusion of homosexuals by picketing his son's Westminster funeral. The videos provided an emotional ending to the evidence portion of the weeklong trial in U.S. District Court. Albert Snyder of York, Pa., the Marine's father, is attempting to be the first in the nation to hold members of Topeka-based Westboro Baptist Church legally liable for their shock protests at military funerals.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1999
An extensive manhunt for a suspect wanted in one of Baltimore's worst mass killings ended early yesterday at a Jessup motel on U.S. 1 when heavily armed police acting on a tip found him in the parking lot at the roadside lodging.Tavon McCoy, 21, is the third person to be arrested in Sunday's killings of five women in a Northeast Baltimore rowhouse. He is charged with five counts of first-degree murder and was being held without bail last night at the Central Booking and Intake Center.Police and federal marshals were searching for a fourth man, Robert Bryant, 23, of the 1200 block of Cavendish Way in O'Donnell Heights, a public housing community in Southeast Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Kara McGuire and Kara McGuire,McClatchy-Tribune | August 27, 2006
MINNEAPOLIS -- Gladys Karhu used to put her soft-drink cans aside so the woman who collected them in her St. Paul neighborhood wouldn't have to pick them out of her garbage. Say the term "bag lady," and an image of that woman comes to Karhu's mind. A 76-year-old retired hospice nurse, Karhu and her husband have a small pension, Social Security and retirement funds. Nevertheless, Karhu wonders whether one day she'll need to pick up cans for cash. "Will the money we have put away last until we no longer need to worry about it?"
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2001
A trial began yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court for three of the men accused of killing five women in a Northeast Baltimore rowhouse in 1999, but the sole person who says he witnessed the killings probably won't testify. Prosecutors and defense lawyers for Ismael Malik Wilson, 28, Travon McCoy, 22, and Robert Bryant, 24, said yesterday that they did not plan to call Ronald McNeil to the stand. A fourth defendant, Tariq A. Malik, 21, who is Wilson's brother, is to stand trial in September because his lawyer had a scheduling conflict.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
A man who survived the killings in December of five women in Northeast Baltimore -- and was later arrested for allegedly kidnapping a woman and threatening to kill one of his relatives -- is wanted in a revenge slaying, police said yesterday. A first-degree murder warrant has been issued for Ronald P. McNeil, 37, of the 3500 block of Elmley Ave. in Belair-Edison, where the five drug-related killings occurred Dec. 5. The warrant contends he shot and killed Chris Manning, 22, about noon Jan. 25 at O'Donnell Street and Demarcay Way. "The motive was revenge for the killing of the five women," said police spokeswoman Angelique Cook-Hayes.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 13, 1999
WHITEVILLE, N.C. -- Trying to find out the last time someone was murdered in this town is not an easy task. Even the man who would seem to know everything, a barber by day and a preacher by night, fumbles for an answer."
NEWS
October 11, 1998
The Maryland Commission for Women and Women Legislators of Maryland are seeking recommendations of outstanding Maryland women for induction into the Maryland Women's Hall of Fame.The Hall of Fame honors women who have made unique and lasting contributions to the economic, political, cultural and social life of the state, and can serve as role models for young women.Nominations will be accepted from organizations and individuals. An independent committee of citizens will review the nominations and make recommendations to the governor.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's Library | November 29, 1992
25 Years Ago (week of Nov. 19-25, 1967):* Police raided a house in the Lawyer's Hill area of Elkridge, arresting a man who listed his occupation as "auto mechanic" for performing illegal abortions. Also arrested, but not charged, were five women from out of state who had come to the house seeking abortions. The auto mechanic's work was described as "very sloppy" by doctors at University of Maryland Hospital who later examined two of the women.50 Years Ago (week of Nov. 22-28, 1942):* Glenelg Manor, home of Mr. and Mrs. W. Bladen Lowndes Sr., was purchased by Roland D. and George R. Zaiser.
NEWS
December 12, 1999
Northeast killings merited a stronger response from cityAs a resident of Northeast Baltimore, I am outraged and saddened by the massacre of five women by handgun- and shotgun-wielding thugs ("Five women found killed in city home," Dec. 6).These killings compound the grief and fear that linger after the recent murder of Tacy Ranta on Parkside Drive.The lack of concern from Baltimore's elected officials for its citizens disappoints and bewilders me.Their scant concern expressed was about the impact of the deaths on the city's reputation, rather than on the victims of the crime.
NEWS
By JULIAN E. BARNES AND RAHEEM SALMAN and JULIAN E. BARNES AND RAHEEM SALMAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 22, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- At least five people, including two women and a child, were killed early yesterday morning in a raid by American special operations forces in Baqouba targeting suspected insurgents. U.S. military officials said two of the men killed in the city northeast of Baghdad were believed to be associates of a senior leader of the al-Qaida in Iraq group previously led by the Abu Musab al-Zarqawi. Along with the women and child who were killed yesterday, at least 25 other people were wounded.
NEWS
By Scott Gold and Ken Ellingwood and Scott Gold and Ken Ellingwood,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2003
ATLANTA -- A man suspected in the serial slayings of at least five Louisiana women was arrested outside a Georgia tire shop last night, two days after authorities matched his DNA to the cases through a combination of shoe-leather detective work and pure luck. Derrick Todd Lee, 34, a truck driver from St. Francisville, La., was arrested by two police officers after the FBI received a tip that he was "wandering" outside the tire shop at about 8:30 p.m., said Atlanta Police Chief Richard Pennington.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2002
A woman pleaded guilty in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday to stealing nearly $34,000 from five elderly women by scaring them into thinking they had to give her money or face losing their health care or electricity. Dundalk resident Vaneka Powers, 22, pleaded guilty yesterday to five counts of continuing theft scheme, which included bilking almost $25,000 from a 75-year-old woman shortly before her death, according to prosecutors. "These were sweet, salt-of-the-earth people," said Assistant State's Attorney Isabel Mercedes Cumming, who prosecuted the case.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2002
PHILADELPHIA - It's five minutes before the start of the biggest showcase of the year, and Candy Hiler is still trying to get her wits about her. She's a little hung over, her back hurts, and aside from shaking out the cobwebs, she can't seem to keep her shoulder-length dark hair out of her eyes. Sitting next to Hiler is Heidi Fitzgerald, who has a demon tattooed on one arm, a pair of dice on the other. "Damn," Hiler says. "Does anybody have a rubber band I can use for a ponytail? I forgot mine."
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
But for her sweater and a morning meeting that took her from her Pentagon office to another room in the sprawling building Sept. 11, Lt. Col. Marilyn Wills wouldn't be here today. The meeting started minutes before her desk was engulfed in flames. The sweater, soaked from the sprinklers, provided water as Wills and her co-workers sucked on its fibers as they groped for an exit through the smoke. Wills led the procession to a window on the second floor, where they jumped to safety. Wills, the Army personnel chief's liaison to Congress, won the Soldier's Medal for her valor that day. But the mother of two from Prince George's County insists the real heroes are those fighting in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
But for her sweater and a morning meeting that took her from her Pentagon office to another room in the sprawling building Sept. 11, Lt. Col. Marilyn Wills wouldn't be here today. The meeting started minutes before her desk was engulfed in flames. The sweater, soaked from the sprinklers, provided water as Wills and her co-workers sucked on its fibers as they groped for an exit through the smoke. Wills led the procession to a window on the second floor, where they jumped to safety. Wills, the Army personnel chief's liaison to Congress, won the Soldier's Medal for her valor that day. But the mother of two from Prince George's County insists the real heroes are those fighting in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1999
The deadly shooting that claimed the lives of five women on Sunday has escalated into a violent, revenge-filled struggle over drugs as police linked a sixth body to the case and detectives found a suspect with his throat slashed.Police have in custody two of the four men wanted in the execution-style slayings of a grandmother, her daughter, granddaughter and two friends -- all found shot inside a Northeast Baltimore rowhouse.And as officers scour the streets in search of the two others, more revelations are surfacing in one of the city's worst mass killings.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | August 15, 2000
THE OTHER DAY, I'm sitting with five women who got squeezed out of their retirement benefits and were wondering how to fully express their anger and despair in the newspaper. Then Dick Cheney comes along. The five women thought they each had up to $5,000 in retirement benefits coming after a combined 82 years of toil for Jos. A. Bank Clothiers. Instead, they get nothing. Dick Cheney, the Republican vice presidential candidate, retires after five years as head of a Texas energy-services company.
TRAVEL
By Special to the Sun | February 17, 2002
A MEMORABLE PLACE An unexpected common language By Dee Lyon SPECIAL TO THE SUN I'm shy. I'm not comfortable meeting new people. When travel writers talk of becoming immersed in the culture of a new country or getting to know the people, I politely ignore the advice. So an amazing thing happened to my husband and me in Russia. On our free day of an eight-day tour, we sampled the remarkable Moscow metro system. Not only is it stunningly beautiful with sculptures, lavish marble, mosaic works and architectural design, but it's also efficient and dirt-cheap.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2001
A Circuit Court jury convicted three men yesterday in the 1999 shooting deaths of five women in a Northeast Baltimore rowhouse, a mass murder that received national attention. In the courtroom, relatives of the victims responded with tears and quiet applause. Some clasped their hands as if in prayer. The men talked to each other, smiled and laughed occasionally as the verdicts were read. One drove several relatives of the victims to tears with a comment as he was led from the courtroom.
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