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By Tom Webband David Everett and Tom Webband David Everett,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 12, 1990
WASHINGTON -- It is a remarkable cast, now reluctantly about to take center stage in the biggest financial scandal in U.S. history.There's a former astronaut. There's a war hero. There are a Senate Democratic power, a lawyer once considered to head the FBI and the head of the Senate Banking Committee.All five have earned acclaim as senators, but starting this week, the public will see them more harshly -- as "The Keating Five," the men accused of seeking favors for a notorious savings and loan executive who showered them with $1.3 million in political donations.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | August 11, 1993
The nation's maritime industry faces no less a crisis than its airlines, say five Democratic senators who want a new business and government panel to investigate reviving the industry.The senators said yesterday that they had introduced legislation to create the panel, which would be appointed by President Clinton. That move was prompted by recent applications of the two largest U.S. shippers' to reflag much of their fleet in foreign countries. Sea-Land Service Inc. and American President Companies hope to avoid tough U.S. regulations, taxes and high labor costs.
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NEWS
By Arizona Republic | September 26, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The FBI inspected financial-disclosure statements last fall of five senators linked to jailed Arizona thrift mogul Charles H. Keating Jr., the Arizona Republic has learned.The documents were requested in November at the height of the Keating affair by an FBI agent based near the Irvine, Calif., headquarters of Mr. Keating's failed Lincoln Savings and Loan Association.FBI Special Agent Gary K. Morely, who is assigned to an FBI office in Santa Ana, Calif., requested the statements on the five senators' finances while in Washington on Nov. 9, 1989, according to a document-request form obtained by the Arizona Republic.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | February 26, 1993
Using a small West Baltimore liquor store as a backdrop, the City Wide Liquor Coalition announced its support yesterday for several state Senate bills that would tighten the city's liquor laws and ban outdooradvertising of alcoholic beverages.The small group of coalition members assembled in front of Jackson's AMKO Liquors at the corner of Edmondson Avenue and Dukeland Street. The store is about as wide as a typical city rowhouse and no fewer than 36 beer and liquor ads appear on its facade.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 16, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The influence-peddling case of the so-called "Keating Five" apparently turned into the case of the "Keating Three" yesterday, when a special counsel for the Senate Select Committee on Ethics said his evidence exonerates two of the five senators under investigation -- John Glenn, D-Ohio, and John McCain, R-Ariz.But counsel Robert Bennett zeroed in on the remaining three -- Sens. Dennis DeConcini, D-Ariz., Alan Cranston, D-Calif., and Donald W. Riegle Jr., D-Mich. -- with detailed evidence linking them to possible ethical transgressions.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 7, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Ethics hearings in the case of the "Keating Five" senators will be delayed for nearly two weeks to make way for the testimony of Charles H. Keating Jr.'s top lobbyist, a move that could push the proceeding into early next year but could also provide some telling evidence.Mr. Keating is the savings and loan executive and political contributor who repeatedly enlisted the help of the five senators in his battles with federal banking regulators from 1984 to 1989, and prospective witness James Grogan was often his go-between on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
February 26, 1991
The Senate Ethics Committee appears near a decision on what to do about the Keating Five senators. This case is still in its very early stages. The lengthy committee hearings involving the five senators, their defense lawyers and the committee's special counsel were only the "preliminary inquiry" stage of the affair.At this point the committee chairman and vice chairman could decide on their own to drop the whole thing. If they choose not to do that, the full Ethics Committee could eventually vote to drop the matter, or to recommend a committee-determined "punishment," such as a letter to the senators saying they shouldn't have done what they did.There have been reports from Washington that such a letter is the worst punishment being considered for the four members of the Keating Five who are planning to run for re-election -- Sens.
NEWS
November 15, 1990
If you want to see how politics can go wrong, take a look at the hearings that begin today on the relationship of five senators with Charles Keating, the savings and loan high-flier. Mr. Keating's ability to enlist such horsepower as these senators to protect him from S&L regulators cost taxpayers $2 billion. Similar influence-wielding by other financiers may eventually cost us hundreds of billions.The hearings are being conducted by the Senate Select Committee on Ethics. If you have cable television, you can catch them live on C-Span, which begins gavel-to-gavel coverage at 9:30 a.m., or on CNN, which has promised "extensive" coverage, or on the commercial networks and PBS, which will no doubt provide relatively full coverage of the opening day of the proceedings.
NEWS
December 9, 1990
Sen. Daniel Inouye of Hawaii defended the Keating Five this week, saying of those five senators' unprecedented joint pressuring of federal regulators in behalf of a big campaign contributor, "I see nothing improper, possibly vigorous, but not improper." Senator Inouye is a fine man in many respects, but when it comes to ethical judgment of his colleagues, well. . .The last time he was involved in one of these controversies it was as chief defense counsel for Sen. Harrison Williams of New Jersey, who resigned in 1982 hours before he was to be expelled for criminal financial acts.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | February 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A possible constitutional conflict between the press and the Senate will begin tomorrow morning, when a reporter refuses to tell a special prosecutor who leaked him Anita Hill's sexual harassment charges against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | February 12, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A possible constitutional conflict between the press and the Senate will begin tomorrow morning, when a reporter refuses to tell a special prosecutor who leaked him Anita Hill's sexual harassment charges against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas."
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Senate Ethics Committee closed a chapter on one of Congress' longest-running scandals yesterday when it announced it had found "substantial credible evidence" that Sen. Alan Cranston, D-Calif., acted improperly in his relationship with former S&L kingpin Charles H. Keating Jr.Mr. Cranston faces the prospect of formal censure on the Senate floor, if the committee recommends such action after it has given him a chance to respond to its charges.At the same time, the panel decided yesterday that no further action was warranted against the other four members of the so-called Keating Five -- senators accused of intervening with banking regulators during Mr. Keating's protracted struggle to win favorable federal treatment for his failing thrift.
NEWS
February 26, 1991
The Senate Ethics Committee appears near a decision on what to do about the Keating Five senators. This case is still in its very early stages. The lengthy committee hearings involving the five senators, their defense lawyers and the committee's special counsel were only the "preliminary inquiry" stage of the affair.At this point the committee chairman and vice chairman could decide on their own to drop the whole thing. If they choose not to do that, the full Ethics Committee could eventually vote to drop the matter, or to recommend a committee-determined "punishment," such as a letter to the senators saying they shouldn't have done what they did.There have been reports from Washington that such a letter is the worst punishment being considered for the four members of the Keating Five who are planning to run for re-election -- Sens.
NEWS
December 9, 1990
Sen. Daniel Inouye of Hawaii defended the Keating Five this week, saying of those five senators' unprecedented joint pressuring of federal regulators in behalf of a big campaign contributor, "I see nothing improper, possibly vigorous, but not improper." Senator Inouye is a fine man in many respects, but when it comes to ethical judgment of his colleagues, well. . .The last time he was involved in one of these controversies it was as chief defense counsel for Sen. Harrison Williams of New Jersey, who resigned in 1982 hours before he was to be expelled for criminal financial acts.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 7, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Ethics hearings in the case of the "Keating Five" senators will be delayed for nearly two weeks to make way for the testimony of Charles H. Keating Jr.'s top lobbyist, a move that could push the proceeding into early next year but could also provide some telling evidence.Mr. Keating is the savings and loan executive and political contributor who repeatedly enlisted the help of the five senators in his battles with federal banking regulators from 1984 to 1989, and prospective witness James Grogan was often his go-between on Capitol Hill.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 4, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The two ranking members of the Senate Ethics Committee indicated yesterday they're having trouble finding anything improper about the behavior of their colleagues in the influence peddling case of the "Keating Five" senators.The five senators being investigated -- Alan Cranston, D-Calif., Dennis DeConcini, D-Ariz., John Glenn, D-Ohio, John McCain, R-Ariz., and Donald W. Riegle Jr., D-Mich. -- are accused of improperly intervening with federal banking regulators on behalf of savings and loan executive Charles H. Keating Jr., who in turn contributed $1.3 million to their re-election campaigns and political committees.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 4, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The two ranking members of the Senate Ethics Committee indicated yesterday they're having trouble finding anything improper about the behavior of their colleagues in the influence peddling case of the "Keating Five" senators.The five senators being investigated -- Alan Cranston, D-Calif., Dennis DeConcini, D-Ariz., John Glenn, D-Ohio, John McCain, R-Ariz., and Donald W. Riegle Jr., D-Mich. -- are accused of improperly intervening with federal banking regulators on behalf of savings and loan executive Charles H. Keating Jr., who in turn contributed $1.3 million to their re-election campaigns and political committees.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman | November 25, 1990
Washington For the cynical and jaded among us, the ethics verdict on the Keating Five senators has been in the books for several months now: Guilty. Get rid of the bums.That's because, viewed in its worst light, the matter seems a simple and damning case of senators who took gobs of money from a political chum in exchange for de-clawing stubborn federal regulators.The chum was Charles H. Keating Jr., chief of the late, un-great Lincoln Savings and Loan, whose institutional death will cost taxpayers $2.3 billion; and the senators sometimes seem to have carried out their favors with the energetic eagerness of tip-cadging errand boys.
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