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By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | July 30, 1995
Q: I have several old fishing lures. A friend told me some might be valuable collectors' items. If this is true, how can I find out what they are worth?A: More than 1,000 lures made before 1940 can be found pictured in color along with their descriptions and current prices in the new book, "Fishing Lure Collectibles -- An Identification and Value Guide to the Most Collectible Antique Fishing Lures" by Dudley Murphy and Rick Edmisten. It is available in a large, hardcover edition for $26.95 postpaid from Ace Enterprises, P.O. Box 59354, Chicago, Ill. 60659.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | July 3, 2003
Dear Cheryl, In response to your June 5 column: Yes, more and more men are thinking about their underwear these days. There are so many options! I would think that most women must be loving all the styles, fabrics and colors that are available to choose from. Plus, it's fun, sexy and exciting to wear something other than boring white boxers or briefs. Do women care about a man's underwear? -- Curious in Baltimore Dear Curious: Do fish swim? Is Ed Burns the hottest man alive? Are Pam Anderson's goods fake?
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NEWS
July 8, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- "The Big One that Got Away" is the title of a new exhibit of fishing lures through Aug. 2 at the farmhouse showcase of the Carroll County Farm Museum.Don Phelps of Arbutus, Baltimore County, has been collecting the fishing lures for 10 years, focusing on fresh water lures.The collection includes hand-painted metal, wood and plastic lures spanning more than 100 years of lure manufacturing in the United States and Europe.The exhibit is open for viewing 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and noon to 5 p.m. on weekends.
BUSINESS
By Christine Demkowych and Christine Demkowych,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 29, 2003
During the 1950s, most visitors to the town of North East in Cecil County would stop at Herb's Tackle Shop to buy bait before driving to a favorite spot on the Elk or North East rivers to catch rockfish. While Herb's is still a hallmark of this town of 2,733 residents, North East has outgrown its old reputation as a river community with good fishing supplies. Today, North East is a boating, camping, hiking, antiquing and dining destination. License plates from Washington, New York, Pennsylvania and Delaware are now an integral part of the mile-long lineup of cars crawling into town on Friday nights.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook | May 5, 1991
SEA TREASURES AND CREATURES OF THE DEEP ARE THE JEWELS IN LUCY ISAACS' NEW MERMAID COLLECTION. WHILE THE NOTION OF STRINGING TOGETHER FISH AND SNAILS AND SEAHORSES MIGHT SEEM UNUSUAL TO SOME, NOVEL MATERIALS HAVE ALWAYS INSPIRED THIS DESIGNER. MS. ISAACS GOT HER START IN THE BUSINESS 20 YEARS AGO AFTER SOMEONE ADMIRED A NECKLACE SHE'D TOSSED TOGETHER OUT OF FISHING LURES WHILE WAITING FOR HER SON TO PURCHASE A FISHING ROD. OTHER THEMES IN HER SPRING LINE INCLUDE GAMBLING MOTIFS, OCCULT TALISMANS AND COSMIC MOON AND STAR CREATIONS.
NEWS
July 27, 1995
A Pasadena woman was charged Tuesday in an attack on her son after he allegedly had made $250 worth of calls to a phone sex service from her home, county police said.Gordon Eric Fox, 18, was treated at Harbor Hospital for facial bruises and released, police said. His mother went to his house about 10:30 a.m., sprayed him with Mace, then hit him with a blackjack, police said. The woman alleged that her son had broken into her home to make the calls, police said.Barbara Faye Fox, 41, of the 600 block of Powhatan Beach Road, was charged with assault and battery, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | July 3, 2003
Dear Cheryl, In response to your June 5 column: Yes, more and more men are thinking about their underwear these days. There are so many options! I would think that most women must be loving all the styles, fabrics and colors that are available to choose from. Plus, it's fun, sexy and exciting to wear something other than boring white boxers or briefs. Do women care about a man's underwear? -- Curious in Baltimore Dear Curious: Do fish swim? Is Ed Burns the hottest man alive? Are Pam Anderson's goods fake?
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | January 3, 1993
It's cold, wet, muddy, windy and just plain nasty. Yep, we are entering the dreaded cabin fever season.Maybe a project or two will help combat the blues, so how about fine-tuning your fishing lures?Let's start by filling the bathtub and then pulling the plugs through the water to see if any tilt when retrieved.This can ruin the action of the lure and cost you a bragging bluefish or record bass. A slight bend of the line-tie eye in the direction you want the lure to go will cure the problem.
NEWS
By John J. Snyder and John J. Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 1999
FOR THE last month, four men have been meeting every Wednesday to tie fishing lures -- or "flies" -- at Dick's Sporting Goods store in the Columbia Crossing shopping center, preparing for spring fishing in sessions led by noted fly-fishing guide Larry Coburn.Last week, they gathered around a rectangular table in an aisle near the bait-and-tackle area, known as the "Back Wall."Kings Contrivance resident Ivan Belyna, 26, is an experienced member of the group. He has been tying flies for more than 10 years.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Evening Sun Staff | October 4, 1990
From Havre de Grace to Solomons, the boats are gassed up and ready to go.Tackle boxes are stocked with new fishing lures -- bucktails, spoons and surgical hose. Thousands of Marylanders and even some out-of-staters have crossed tomorrow off their work schedules to spend the day on Chesapeake Bay.Tomorrow morning, the striped bass fishing moratorium will be lifted, nearly six years after Maryland banned catching the popular black-striped fish, commonly known as rockfish. The anticipation among anglers is palpable.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2001
The little bait shop John L. Morris installed in his father's liquor store in Springfield, Mo., nearly 30 years ago has come a long way. The business that has evolved into the Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World chain still sells fishing lures - more than 30,000 of them. But today's Bass Pro stores, typically the size of three football fields, draw outdoors sports enthusiasts of all stripes, from golfers to boaters to campers and hunters. The Springfield-based chain - still headed by founder Morris - will open its newest mega-store today, becoming the biggest anchor at Arundel Mills, near Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1999
Baltimore County's Gunpowder River is a nationally recognized destination for anglers, but its trout fishery is in danger of becoming a casualty of the drought gripping Maryland.Temperatures in the river are rising as the water level of the Prettyboy Reservoir recedes -- threatening a devastating fish kill.The reservoir's water is released into the Gunpowder so it can flow to Loch Raven Reservoir, which supplies the city and surrounding counties with drinking water. Water in the Prettyboy is warmer than usual now because it is so low.State officials say they are taking steps to protect the fishery, but if the drought forces a choice between its needs and those of homes and factories, the trout are out of luck.
NEWS
By John J. Snyder and John J. Snyder,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 1999
FOR THE last month, four men have been meeting every Wednesday to tie fishing lures -- or "flies" -- at Dick's Sporting Goods store in the Columbia Crossing shopping center, preparing for spring fishing in sessions led by noted fly-fishing guide Larry Coburn.Last week, they gathered around a rectangular table in an aisle near the bait-and-tackle area, known as the "Back Wall."Kings Contrivance resident Ivan Belyna, 26, is an experienced member of the group. He has been tying flies for more than 10 years.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | January 15, 1997
FISH TASTES BETTER when the weather turns colder. Maybe this happens because the flavor of the fish improves if it has been swimming in very cold waters. Or maybe it is because on a cold night, a sizzling platter of fish seems especially appealing to a chilly eater.Regardless of whose cold flesh is responsible, that of the fish or that of the eater, a baked fish makes a pleasing winter supper.A good fish supper begins, of course, earlier in the day with a trip to a fish market. Last Saturday, when the snow crunched under our feet and the air was so sharp it made our cheeks sting, my family and I piled in our station wagon and headed to the Lexington Market in downtown Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Knight-Ridder/Tribune News Service | July 30, 1995
Q: I have several old fishing lures. A friend told me some might be valuable collectors' items. If this is true, how can I find out what they are worth?A: More than 1,000 lures made before 1940 can be found pictured in color along with their descriptions and current prices in the new book, "Fishing Lure Collectibles -- An Identification and Value Guide to the Most Collectible Antique Fishing Lures" by Dudley Murphy and Rick Edmisten. It is available in a large, hardcover edition for $26.95 postpaid from Ace Enterprises, P.O. Box 59354, Chicago, Ill. 60659.
NEWS
July 27, 1995
A Pasadena woman was charged Tuesday in an attack on her son after he allegedly had made $250 worth of calls to a phone sex service from her home, county police said.Gordon Eric Fox, 18, was treated at Harbor Hospital for facial bruises and released, police said. His mother went to his house about 10:30 a.m., sprayed him with Mace, then hit him with a blackjack, police said. The woman alleged that her son had broken into her home to make the calls, police said.Barbara Faye Fox, 41, of the 600 block of Powhatan Beach Road, was charged with assault and battery, police said.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | March 13, 1994
I did a little local sporting goods store hopping last weekend. Everywhere I went, from Angler's to WalMart, I found anxious anglers shopping for fishing lures.Lots of folks were rattling and squeezing and closely inspecting lures of all types, mostly aimed at bass anglers.But despite my half-dozen overflowing tackle boxes, I wind up using a handful of reliable lures that do the job year after year.The plastic worm has tied me into more bass than all other lures combined. It is especially deadly on largemouth bass.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2001
The little bait shop John L. Morris installed in his father's liquor store in Springfield, Mo., nearly 30 years ago has come a long way. The business that has evolved into the Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World chain still sells fishing lures - more than 30,000 of them. But today's Bass Pro stores, typically the size of three football fields, draw outdoors sports enthusiasts of all stripes, from golfers to boaters to campers and hunters. The Springfield-based chain - still headed by founder Morris - will open its newest mega-store today, becoming the biggest anchor at Arundel Mills, near Baltimore-Washington International Airport.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | July 7, 1995
In yesterday's edition of Maryland Live, the name of the rock band Phish was misspelled.* The Sun regrets the error.A LIVE ONEFish (Elektra 61777)Being great onstage doesn't always work to a band's advantage in the CD shop, since it's hard to re-create the communal vibe of a killer concert in the recording studio. Nor are live albums always the answer, as too often the listener at home is left thinking, "Guess you had to have been there." Fortunately, Fish's "A Live One" really is the next best thing to being there.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | March 13, 1994
I did a little local sporting goods store hopping last weekend. Everywhere I went, from Angler's to WalMart, I found anxious anglers shopping for fishing lures.Lots of folks were rattling and squeezing and closely inspecting lures of all types, mostly aimed at bass anglers.But despite my half-dozen overflowing tackle boxes, I wind up using a handful of reliable lures that do the job year after year.The plastic worm has tied me into more bass than all other lures combined. It is especially deadly on largemouth bass.
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