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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 5, 1992
GLOUCESTER, Mass. -- Boat captain Salvatore Napoli fondly recalls how, just a decade ago, he and his fishing mates would chug out to the ocean and, in a week, net up to 40 tons of cod, haddock, flounder and other bottom-dwelling fish.Last week, after 10 days at sea, he returned with only a quarter of that haul."Today, we don't bring in much fish," sighed Mr. Napoli, 38, a native of Sicily who has been fishing off the New England coast for 18 years and still speaks with a heavy accent.All around him, orange-suited laborers were hurriedly unloading the 75-foot-long boat and packing piles of fresh, glistening fish into ice-filled, gray plastic shipping containers.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 16, 2013
Seismic testing for oil and gas off Maryland and other Atlantic coast states could cause widespread harm to whales, dolphins, sea turtles and fish, as well as to fishing and tourism, an environmental group warned Tuesday. Oceana said the federal government's own environmental impact statement estimates 138,500 whales and dolphins could be injured if seismic "airguns," which generate blasts of noise underwater, are used to explore for oil and gas along the Atlantic coast.  The Department of Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is weighing applications to conduct offshore seismic testing from Delaware to Florida.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2005
Hurricane Katrina severely disrupted the Gulf Coast's natural landscape by sweeping away barrier islands, polluting waterways and ripping up wetlands vital to shrimp, crabs and oysters. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has declared a widespread failure of the $700 million-a-year Gulf Coast fishing industry because habitats and fishing boats were ruined. "Louisiana is known for its seafood - oysters, shrimp and fish - and all of this could be severely affected by this event," said Harry Roberts, director of coastal studies at Louisiana State University.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2012
The number of young striped bass in the Chesapeake Bay fell to a record low this year, a drastic decline from a near-record high the year before, state officials reported Tuesday. State biologists checking Maryland's part of the bay found the fewest newly spawned striped bass that they've tallied in any year since annual surveys for the fish began 59 years ago, the Department of Natural Resources reported. Maryland's state fish, also known as rockfish, is closely monitored because it supports a multimillion-dollar recreational and commercial fishing industry that employs thousands.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Weiss and Kenneth R. Weiss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 2002
PORT McNEILL, British Columbia - If you bought a salmon filet in the supermarket recently or ordered one in a restaurant, chances are it was born in a plastic tray here, or a place just like it. Instead of streaking through the ocean or leaping up rocky streams, it spent three years like a marine couch potato, circling lazily in pens, fattening up on pellets of salmon chow. It was vaccinated as a small fry to survive the diseases that race through these oceanic feedlots, acres of net-covered pens tethered offshore.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 19, 1994
A major fight is shaping up in Congress over the role of eight little-known committees created by federal law two decades ago to protect U.S. waters from overfishing by foreign vessels.Critics of the committees, who include members of Congress, environmentalists and even some committee members, say that in some cases the panels have proved to be their own worst enemies by allowing overfishing of those same waters by U.S. vessels.Such overharvesting has helped to bring about the fishing industry's drastic decline.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 21, 1994
HOUSTON -- Like many fish stories, this is a tale about the ones that got away. So many, in fact -- about 1 million -- that the FBI is investigating.Sometime between December and January, $100,000 worth of baby catfish, or fingerlings, were stolen from spawning ponds near Danbury, a small town on the upper Texas coast about 50 miles southwest of here.The theft was not noticed until late last month, when workers at Anat, an aquaculture company, were rounding up fingerlings for a sale and discovered that three of the company's spawning ponds had been emptied.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
The movie didn't have a happy ending, but the boat that portrayed the ill-fated Andrea Gail in "The Perfect Storm" will get one. Lady Grace, a commercial fishing boat from Ocean City, has been sold to Legal Sea Foods of Boston for $145,100. "I read the book. I saw the movie. We used to purchase a lot of fish off the Andrea Gail," says Roger Berkowitz, chief executive of the restaurant chain. Berkowitz bought the boat Friday from Warner Bros. Pictures through the on-line auction house eBay.
NEWS
By ANDREW SHARPLESS | March 21, 2006
Little-noticed but enormously significant steps were taken recently in World Trade Organization negotiations to rid the world's fishing industry of government subsidies that provide incentives to fish the oceans to death. For the first time since the launch of the WTO's current round of talks in 2001, member nations have moved beyond the consensus that many fishing subsidies lead to overfishing and destructive practices. At least five countries have submitted detailed proposals on eliminating these subsidies, and serious negotiations are under way. It is a step beyond rhetoric toward resolution on what is the greatest single action that can be taken to ensure the future viability of ocean ecosystems and the bounty they produce.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | December 31, 2006
The End of the Line Charles Clover The New Press / 384 pages / $26.95 As Atlantic cod were being fished nearly to extinction on the Grand Banks during the 1980s, Canadian fishery scientists convinced their government not to stop the industry. Fishermen shouldn't face strict catch limits, the biologists argued, because a smaller population of adult cod would reproduce more fruitfully than a large one. The researchers claimed that fishing had little impact on fish populations and that water temperatures and other factors were far more important.
NEWS
By Andrea Kavanagh | November 12, 2007
Like small boats in an unending squall, U.S. consumers are buffeted from all sides with information about what kind of food to buy and why it's good - or bad - for them. In such a convergence of advertising, news and constant marketing, timely and accurate information is crucial for those who want to make healthful and affordable choices. That's why it was so disturbing when a group called the National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition released a report recently encouraging pregnant women to increase their consumption of fish despite the well-known risk of mercury and other contaminants commonly found in certain seafood.
NEWS
By Michael Martinez and Michael Martinez,Chicago Tribune | May 13, 2007
MORRO BAY, Calif. -- Beyond the scenic shore here dotted by an ancient volcano's peak, California has created the first-of-its-kind network of marine havens along its 1,100-mile coast, which officials liken to Teddy Roosevelt's creation of national parks, except these "parks" are at sea. Many of the first 29 preserves midway between Los Angeles and San Francisco aspire to return the sea to paradise conditions, the way it was before modern California became...
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Staff | May 6, 2007
The Most Important Fish in the Sea Menhaden and America By H. Bruce Franklin Island Press / 252 pages / $25 Last July, then-Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. posed for cameras beside environmentalists on a scenic bluff overlooking the Chesapeake Bay and made what everyone present claimed was an historic announcement. With Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine live on a teleconference screen at Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis, the governors proclaimed that they were going to save the bay by imposing a cap on fishing for menhaden.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun Reporter | December 31, 2006
The End of the Line Charles Clover The New Press / 384 pages / $26.95 As Atlantic cod were being fished nearly to extinction on the Grand Banks during the 1980s, Canadian fishery scientists convinced their government not to stop the industry. Fishermen shouldn't face strict catch limits, the biologists argued, because a smaller population of adult cod would reproduce more fruitfully than a large one. The researchers claimed that fishing had little impact on fish populations and that water temperatures and other factors were far more important.
NEWS
By ANDREW SHARPLESS | March 21, 2006
Little-noticed but enormously significant steps were taken recently in World Trade Organization negotiations to rid the world's fishing industry of government subsidies that provide incentives to fish the oceans to death. For the first time since the launch of the WTO's current round of talks in 2001, member nations have moved beyond the consensus that many fishing subsidies lead to overfishing and destructive practices. At least five countries have submitted detailed proposals on eliminating these subsidies, and serious negotiations are under way. It is a step beyond rhetoric toward resolution on what is the greatest single action that can be taken to ensure the future viability of ocean ecosystems and the bounty they produce.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | September 11, 2005
Hurricane Katrina severely disrupted the Gulf Coast's natural landscape by sweeping away barrier islands, polluting waterways and ripping up wetlands vital to shrimp, crabs and oysters. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has declared a widespread failure of the $700 million-a-year Gulf Coast fishing industry because habitats and fishing boats were ruined. "Louisiana is known for its seafood - oysters, shrimp and fish - and all of this could be severely affected by this event," said Harry Roberts, director of coastal studies at Louisiana State University.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | February 7, 1993
The way Canadian officials have dealt with salmon fishing should sound vaguely familiar to Chesapeake Bay fishermen and their experiences with rockfish.Before 1990, Canadian officials estimated that fewer than 4,000 salmon were being caught by Atlantic province sports anglers. That's the same year that a daring ban on all commercial netting of salmon within Canada's Labrador coast took effect."Last year sports fishing reported 27,000 salmon were caught in Labrador's rivers," Bruce Metcalfe told about 100 members of the area and national outdoors press during a seminar at the Canadian Embassy in Washington touting hunting and fishing prospects in the Atlantic provinces of Newfoundland, Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island.
NEWS
November 16, 2003
Maryland needs EPA to take on mercury polluters The Environmental Protection Agency's decision to drop enforcement lawsuits against hundreds of power plants ("EPA abandons air pollution cases," Nov. 6) will not only affect our health and environment, it will also be a serious blow to the fishing industry. Mercury pollution from power plants already hurts Maryland's women, children and fishermen, yet the EPA still refuses to write strong regulations for its emission. A 2002 regional study showed that Maryland had the highest mercury content in its rain of the dozen states studied, and the Maryland Department of the Environment has posted health warnings for mercury covering every lake and river in the entire state.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - Commercial fishing advocates from Louisiana to Rhode Island joined Maryland in objecting to the proposed listing of the Eastern oyster as an endangered species, saying it's unnecessary and would kill the troubled industry. "We believe this petition is a misuse of the Endangered Species Act," said S. Lake Cowart Jr., vice president of the Cowart Seafood Corp. of Virginia. "The Eastern oyster is not in danger of extinction; healthy populations exist in the Gulf Coast states and the north Atlantic, which makes up the majority of its range."
NEWS
November 16, 2003
Maryland needs EPA to take on mercury polluters The Environmental Protection Agency's decision to drop enforcement lawsuits against hundreds of power plants ("EPA abandons air pollution cases," Nov. 6) will not only affect our health and environment, it will also be a serious blow to the fishing industry. Mercury pollution from power plants already hurts Maryland's women, children and fishermen, yet the EPA still refuses to write strong regulations for its emission. A 2002 regional study showed that Maryland had the highest mercury content in its rain of the dozen states studied, and the Maryland Department of the Environment has posted health warnings for mercury covering every lake and river in the entire state.
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