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SPORTS
July 23, 2011
"I don't want to piddle in anyone's corn flakes," as my grandma Opal Starner used to say, her prelude to the main event. Folks at Baltimore's transportation department, put your hands over the bowls. I took a ride late last week to see your Nicodemus Bridge makeover. Nice idea, fine execution. But here comes the piddle: you ruined a half-century-old fishing spot for no good reason. The bridge over Liberty Reservoir at the Baltimore County-Carroll County line has been a great fishing spot since Howdy Doody was a 2-by-4.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
We start out at Coyopa post-Tribal Council. Baylor is a little freaked out by how close she got to going home and she's not going to let Josh do the talking for her. John tries to play it that he was trying to protect Val, if only she had played her Idol. Umm, if you're really in an alliance with someone, you don't make them play their Immunity Idol unless you really, really have to. At Hunahpu, Drew points out that their roof isn't the most waterproof, and apparently monsoon season is on the way. But instead of helping weave palm fronds to fix the problem, Drew decides to take a nap. Not a good way to make friends on your tribe, dude.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A federal council took a preliminary step Monday toward protecting deep-sea corals off Maryland and the rest of the mid-Atlantic coast. The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council voted unanimously to seek public input on what should be done to prevent commercial fishing gear from damaging the fragile, slow-growing corals, about which until recently little was known. Research cruises over the past few years have documented their presence in several of the many deep canyons cutting into the eastern edge of the continental shelf, about 70 miles off the coast.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 14, 2014
Rick Snider of Biglerville, Pa., was the top winner in the grand-prize drawing at the Maryland Fishing Challenge Finale last Sunday, walking away with a boat, motor and trailer from Bass Pro Shops and Tracker Boats. "Aside from my kids, grandkids and wife, this is the most awesome thing to ever happen," said Snider, who qualified for the drawing by catching an Angler Award-qualifying 40.5-inch striped bass off Breezy Point in Calvert County from his sailboat. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources presented more than $70,000 in cash, prizes and merchandise at the celebration of fishing attended by more than 2,000 people, including sponsors, contestants and their guests, at Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis.
NEWS
August 24, 2011
Oxford Nautical Festival and Flea Market What: Enjoy a day of visiting the scenic and historic town of Oxford, founded in 1683, in Talbot County on the Eastern Shore. The town's first Nautical Festival and Flea Market offers vendors selling nautically themed items, including arts and crafts, boats, fishing gear, dock accessories, clothing, and marine services. The festival also features book signings, music and a lecture from the curator of the Oxford Museum. In the evening, head to the Masthead at Pier Street Marina for a crab feast at Causeway Park, featuring a performance by Three Penny Opera for the benefit of the Maryland Watermen's Association.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 14, 2014
Rick Snider of Biglerville, Pa., was the top winner in the grand-prize drawing at the Maryland Fishing Challenge Finale last Sunday, walking away with a boat, motor and trailer from Bass Pro Shops and Tracker Boats. "Aside from my kids, grandkids and wife, this is the most awesome thing to ever happen," said Snider, who qualified for the drawing by catching an Angler Award-qualifying 40.5-inch striped bass off Breezy Point in Calvert County from his sailboat. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources presented more than $70,000 in cash, prizes and merchandise at the celebration of fishing attended by more than 2,000 people, including sponsors, contestants and their guests, at Sandy Point State Park in Annapolis.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Candy.thomson@baltsun.com | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
NEWS
By Carrie Madren | July 18, 2011
Camouflaged in waters around many of our rivers and the Chesapeake Bay, lost fishing gear no longer brings in seafood but continues to snag marine life. The gear - crab pots, tangled fishing line or nets - were either abandoned or dropped from a severed line. This derelict gear poses a threat to fish, birds and invertebrates, as well as to water craft with propellers and anchors that can become entangled in line or nets. Part of the problem is monofilament fishing line. According to the BoatUS Foundation, mono-filament can persist for 500 years in the water, accumulating at popular fishing holes.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
For several years, fans of pro basketball and Major League Baseball have had opportunities to attend fantasy camps in which they work out with and learn from the professionals.Now, Bobby Wilson, a South Carolina pro angler, has put together a similar program for bass fishermen. Called Camp Fish-N-Fun, Wilson's fantasy camp is suited to all fishermen over the age of 12, but is aimed at those who follow the professional bass fishing circuits.Wilson has lined up 26 bass pros to eat and fish with campers, and to teach shoreside seminars.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A federal council took a preliminary step Monday toward protecting deep-sea corals off Maryland and the rest of the mid-Atlantic coast. The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council voted unanimously to seek public input on what should be done to prevent commercial fishing gear from damaging the fragile, slow-growing corals, about which until recently little was known. Research cruises over the past few years have documented their presence in several of the many deep canyons cutting into the eastern edge of the continental shelf, about 70 miles off the coast.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
It's hard work catching soft crabs, a fickle livelihood in an increasingly precarious part of the world. Starting before sunup, Smith Island waterman Mark Kitching spends hours repeatedly "scraping" the submerged grass beds that grow abundantly around his home in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay. On a recent morning, he's commuted 45 minutes through the pre-dawn darkness to work north of Holland Straits some 13 miles away. The Cummins diesel engine in his work boat, Miss Anita, provides the power to drag a pair of nets through thick grass beds where Kitching hopes to find soft crabs and "peelers," those young crabs about to shed their shells and form larger new ones.
NEWS
June 1, 2012
Sunday, June 3 Classical concert Sundays At Three Chamber Music Series presents the Monarch Brass Quintet performing "Romantic Brass" at 3 p.m. at Christ Episcopal Church, 6800 Oakland Mills Road in Columbia. The program features the music of Tchaikovsky, Debussy, Dvorak, Mahler, Kamen and Donaudy. Tickets are $15, free for those 17 and younger accompanied by an adult. Information: 443-288-3179 or sundaysatthree.org. Tuesday, June 5 School news The Audit Committee of the Board of Education meets at 8 a.m. in Conference Room ML2 at 10910 Clarksville Pike in Ellicott City.
NEWS
August 24, 2011
Oxford Nautical Festival and Flea Market What: Enjoy a day of visiting the scenic and historic town of Oxford, founded in 1683, in Talbot County on the Eastern Shore. The town's first Nautical Festival and Flea Market offers vendors selling nautically themed items, including arts and crafts, boats, fishing gear, dock accessories, clothing, and marine services. The festival also features book signings, music and a lecture from the curator of the Oxford Museum. In the evening, head to the Masthead at Pier Street Marina for a crab feast at Causeway Park, featuring a performance by Three Penny Opera for the benefit of the Maryland Watermen's Association.
SPORTS
July 23, 2011
"I don't want to piddle in anyone's corn flakes," as my grandma Opal Starner used to say, her prelude to the main event. Folks at Baltimore's transportation department, put your hands over the bowls. I took a ride late last week to see your Nicodemus Bridge makeover. Nice idea, fine execution. But here comes the piddle: you ruined a half-century-old fishing spot for no good reason. The bridge over Liberty Reservoir at the Baltimore County-Carroll County line has been a great fishing spot since Howdy Doody was a 2-by-4.
NEWS
By Carrie Madren | July 18, 2011
Camouflaged in waters around many of our rivers and the Chesapeake Bay, lost fishing gear no longer brings in seafood but continues to snag marine life. The gear - crab pots, tangled fishing line or nets - were either abandoned or dropped from a severed line. This derelict gear poses a threat to fish, birds and invertebrates, as well as to water craft with propellers and anchors that can become entangled in line or nets. Part of the problem is monofilament fishing line. According to the BoatUS Foundation, mono-filament can persist for 500 years in the water, accumulating at popular fishing holes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
We start out at Coyopa post-Tribal Council. Baylor is a little freaked out by how close she got to going home and she's not going to let Josh do the talking for her. John tries to play it that he was trying to protect Val, if only she had played her Idol. Umm, if you're really in an alliance with someone, you don't make them play their Immunity Idol unless you really, really have to. At Hunahpu, Drew points out that their roof isn't the most waterproof, and apparently monsoon season is on the way. But instead of helping weave palm fronds to fix the problem, Drew decides to take a nap. Not a good way to make friends on your tribe, dude.
NEWS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | December 19, 1994
Mark Bozymski stops while shopping to marvel at a glass case that holds fishing gear from decades past -- including a 1940s Pflueger-model bay reel and a 1950s Ted Williams-model reel. Then, kneeling before a display of hooks and sinkers, he finds the chosen one, a one-hook spinner perfect for creeks near his Annapolis home.His pilgrimage, a journey through fishing's past and present, is complete.Mr. Bozymski, 32, can return home satisfied by another trip to T. G. Tochterman and Sons, the revered Eastern Avenue bait and tackle shop that has lured anglers for miles and for generations.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Candy.thomson@baltsun.com | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | December 17, 2009
Another premier Maryland trout stream has become tainted by an invasive algae feared worldwide for its ability to coat the bottom of rivers and lakes and smother the habitat and food supply of fish. Biologists at the Department of Natural Resources announced Wednesday that didymo, known by anglers as "rock snot," was found in Garrett County's Savage River late last month. "There's nothing we can do short of closing the area down, and that's draconian," said Don Cosden, inland fisheries director.
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