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NEWS
November 1, 2013
Thanks for your excellent reporting on the Charles County growth situation ( "State, Charles County at odds over growth plan," Oct. 28). I am conservation director for the Southern Region of the Maryland Bass Nation, a bass fishing organization. The area in and around Mattawoman Creek is one the country's best bass fisheries. Many national and regional bass fishing tournaments are held there, bringing many people to the area who provide revenues to local businesses such as motels and restaurants.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
A federal council took a preliminary step Monday toward protecting deep-sea corals off Maryland and the rest of the mid-Atlantic coast. The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council voted unanimously to seek public input on what should be done to prevent commercial fishing gear from damaging the fragile, slow-growing corals, about which until recently little was known. Research cruises over the past few years have documented their presence in several of the many deep canyons cutting into the eastern edge of the continental shelf, about 70 miles off the coast.
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SPORTS
By Bill Burton | November 13, 1991
In a surprise move, the Department of Natural Resources yesterday declared a third extension of the fall recreational fishery for rock. It will coincide with the previously announced two-day reopener of the charter season Saturday and Sunday.The daily limit in both fisheries will be two a day between 18 and 36 inches, and no permits are needed. The unexpected extension of the recreational fishery is attributed to poor weather last weekend that cut into the expected catch. DNR said both fisheries have not reached their quotas, and reserved comment concerning yet another addition to the recreational fishery should weather once again sour catches to keep anglers short of their total of 456,747 pounds.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
Tucked amid the woods of northern Baltimore County is one of Maryland's natural gems - the Big Gunpowder Falls, a nationally renowned trout stream that draws anglers from far and wide to try their skills and luck in the cold, rushing water. But some fishermen and fishing guides say they're having a harder time getting at this prized outdoor resource - though it's publicly accessible in Gunpowder Falls State Park - because of unusually heavy river flows that make it hard to fish or even stand at times in the water.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1995
The Potomac River from the Route 301 bridge north to Washington has been the best largemouth bass fishery in the region for a number of years, and a recent six-month study by the Department of Natural Resources shows that it is continuing to improve.The creel survey, conducted by DNR's Freshwater Fisheries Division, showed that 70 percent of all anglers fishing above the Route 301 bridge target bass and had an average catch rate of .465 fish per hour. Of the fishermen surveyed, 81 percent said they release their catch.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
The Department of Natural Resources opened a series of public meetings on proposed changes in blue crab regulations here Tuesday night, proposals that were met with mixed opinions from about three dozen recreational and commercial crabbers.Dave Blazer, assistant to the director of DNR's Tidal Fisheries Division, opened the meeting at Annapolis High School by saying DNR wants feedback from the public so that the proposed regulations can be fine-tuned to meet the needs of the user groups.The goals of the proposals, Blazer said, are to allow a "reasonable" fishery for all crabbers, to be conservative in the size of the crab harvest and to ensure that Maryland and Virginia regulations on crabbing work in concert for the benefit of the fisheries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynn Williams and Lynn Williams,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 7, 1991
The FisheryWhere: 1717 Eastern Ave., Fells Point.Hours: Open 11:30 a.m. to midnight Mondays to Thursdays, 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 11:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Sundays.Credit Cards: AE, CB, DC, MC, V.Features: seafood, Spanish cuisine.Non-smoking section? Yes.Call: 327-9340.** 1/2We liked everything on our plates at the Fishery. The seafood was fresh and abundant. Oysters were available, even out of season, and were enormous. Lump crab was laid on with a generous hand.So what's the problem?
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | September 15, 2002
Let's hope today's a washout. Tomorrow, too. Heck, it could rain from now until the end of the mourning dove season's first split on Oct. 19 as far as I'm concerned. That's what we need to help keep Prettyboy Reservoir afloat, put water back into the Gunpowder River tributaries and perk up the trout stock. To look at the Gunpowder right now, you'd swear things were hunky dory. Water gushes over rocks and races downstream. Wading fly fishermen need stout hiking sticks to fight the current.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | January 20, 1991
For a short time last October, rockfish again captured the fancy of Maryland fishermen. In the time since, there has been much ado about a recreational season for stripers this year. It would be split between dates in May and October or November.A fall recreational fishery is virtually certain. What will transpire this spring, however, is questionable.Under the Maryland management plan, which has been submitted to and approved by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, the spring season must be held between May 1 and May 31 -- and fishing efforts must be limited to minimal catches of trophy-size stripers.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
Crabbers, name your price. In an unprecedented move to protect Chesapeake Bay crabs, the state is offering to buy back more than half of the commercial crabbing licenses held by Marylanders. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources announced Thursday that it wants to retire up to 3,676 of the "limited crab catcher" licenses it has issued over the years and is willing to pay for them. The voluntary buyback is the state's most recent bid to protect the bay's iconic crustacean from overfishing as it recovers from a near-disastrous decline.
NEWS
By Gerald W. Winegrad | May 8, 2014
The recent bad news on the serious decline in female blue crabs (" May 1) and the subsequent editorial ("Singing the blues," May 5 ) calling for much tighter harvest restrictions should be a wake-up call for all who care about the Chesapeake Bay. The winter dredge survey found one of the lowest crab levels in 25 years of sampling. The harvest in 2013 was the lowest in more than 20 years. At the root of this decline are two factors: overharvest and poor environmental conditions.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
Thanks for your excellent reporting on the Charles County growth situation ( "State, Charles County at odds over growth plan," Oct. 28). I am conservation director for the Southern Region of the Maryland Bass Nation, a bass fishing organization. The area in and around Mattawoman Creek is one the country's best bass fisheries. Many national and regional bass fishing tournaments are held there, bringing many people to the area who provide revenues to local businesses such as motels and restaurants.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 19, 2013
There's new help on the way for what used to be the Chesapeake Bay's most important fish, though how much good it will do remains to be seen. The Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council has enacted a first-ever cap on how many American shad and related fish that ocean-going fishing trawlers can catch by accident when going after other species such as Spanish Atlantic mackerel. Shad once thronged the Chesapeake every spring when they made their spawning runs up the bay's rivers from the Atlantic Ocean, but centuries of overfishing, pollution and habitat loss from construction of dams and other obstructions depleted them to the point that Maryland closed its fishery for them in 1980.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
From Virginia, New Jersey and points in between, busloads of fishermen are coming to Baltimore for a showdown Friday over how much to curb the industrial-scale harvest of a small, oily fish that figures prominently in the seafood industry, though no one eats it directly. It also is an important food source for fish and wildlife in the Chesapeake Bay and beyond. After decades of study and debate, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, which regulates near-shore fishing, is meeting here to adopt a first-ever plan to limit the catch of menhaden, the most intensely harvested fish on the East Coast and second-biggest catch nationwide.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
As fish farming grows to feed a world hungry for protein, there's a hitch - the seas are being scoured of the little wild fish to feed the big captive ones destined for the dinner table. Researchers in Baltimore think they may have hit upon a remedy, one that moves aquaculture closer to truly being sustainable. Working at the Institute of Marine and Environmental Technology, a branch of the University System of Maryland, scientists have developed a plant-based fish food that even finny meat eaters like striped bass gobble up. The fish raised on such a nearly vegetarian diet also are healthier to eat, they say, with fewer of the worrisome chemical contaminants that show up in wild or even many farm-raised fish.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Richard N. Novotny Sr., former executive director of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association who also lobbied on behalf of state recreational fishermen, died Sunday of kidney failure at Ivy Hall Geriatric & Rehabilitation Center in Middle River. The longtime Essex resident was 67. "He was highly regarded, and when Rich was in a leadership role, he helped form a strong relationship between [the Department of Natural Resources] and the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 17, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- The charter-boat season for striped bass will close Saturday at 8 p.m., William P. Jensen, director of fisheries for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Tidewater Administration, said yesterday."
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 17, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- On the rockfish front, there is good news and bad news for fishermen.The good news is that there almost certainly will be a spring fishery in Maryland this year. The bad news is that almost certainly there will not be enough fish to go around.But in the case of rockfish, a species recovering from stock depletion caused in large part by overfishing and loss of suitable habitat, what is detrimental to fishermen this year will be to their benefit in the future.Monday, the Department of Natural Resources laid out its preferred plan for a spring trophy fishery on migratory stocks of rockfish.
NEWS
May 21, 2012
The Chesapeake Bay and our coastal areas have always been a staple of Maryland. Throughout the years, I've witnessed the literal and figurative ebb and flow of the tides in hopes that someone would take the initiative to protect the future of our state's abundant fishing and recreational opportunities. I believe that the recently introduced Fisheries Investment and Regulatory Relief Act of 2012 (FIRRA) would provide the funding needed to ensure that our rich Maryland fishing traditions remain strong and our coastal communities continue to be a place for Maryland residents and visitors to enjoy.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 15, 2012
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler says he's considering going to court if the interstate panel that regulates Atlantic coast fishing for menhaden doesn't cut back enough the catch of a Virginia-based fleet that takes the lion's share of the forage fish. Speaking at a Chesapeake Bay scientific symposium in Baltimore on Monday, Gansler said he was "working with" the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission as it ponders tightening harvest limits on menhaden. Called by some "the most important fish in the sea," menhaden are a food source for many other fish and wildlife, including ospreys and striped bass, Maryland's state fish.
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