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January 7, 2012
The 38th East Coast Commercial Fishermen's & Aquaculture Trade Exposition will be held Friday through next Sunday at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center in Ocean City . More than 50 vendors are expected to have their wares on display during the weekend event, which is expected to attract commercial fishermen, charter boat captains, aquaculturists, scientists and educators. Among the events held during the weekend will be seminars for aquaculturists and commercial fishing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Mike King and The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Midway through winter, a chilly fog surrounded Theaux Le Gardeur's shop. Hardly anyone would be out on the Gunpowder River that day, he said. But he didn't need the river or sunlight. He stood behind his fly-fishing store clutching three rods: graphite, glass and bamboo. One by one, he tossed them back with his forearm and flicked them forward, eliciting the characteristic swish of fly line cutting through air. Each rod carried the line, bounced back quickly and delivered the fly far ahead of Le Gardeur, depositing the insect imitations onto the slick grass next to Backwater Angler.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Four Maryland men were charged with power dredging for oysters in a sanctuary on Tilghman Island, the state's Department of Natural Resources said Friday. DNR police charged Bartlett Wade Murphy Jr., 39, Benjamin Murphy, 62, both of Tilghman Island, and Willis Leanard Coleman Jr., 59 of Cambridge, and Robert Andrew Walker, 43 of Hurlock, with removing oysters from the Harris Creek Sanctuary. The state is rebuilding reefs within the sanctuary to restore the bay's oyster population.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Four Maryland men were charged with power dredging for oysters in a sanctuary on Tilghman Island, the state's Department of Natural Resources said Friday. DNR police charged Bartlett Wade Murphy Jr., 39, Benjamin Murphy, 62, both of Tilghman Island, and Willis Leanard Coleman Jr., 59 of Cambridge, and Robert Andrew Walker, 43 of Hurlock, with removing oysters from the Harris Creek Sanctuary. The state is rebuilding reefs within the sanctuary to restore the bay's oyster population.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2011
The Department of Natural Resources will announce today that it has made its own large catch — 60 recreational fishermen involved in a variety of illegal activities on Maryland's waterways in the past five months. As a result, the agency has proposed suspending their licenses for anywhere from 30 days to a year depending on the seriousness of the crime. It marks the first time that the DNR has proposed recreational licenses be suspended since the legislature empowered it to do so more than two years ago. Those who are in jeopardy of losing their licenses have been notified by mail and have 30 days to request an administrative hearing.
SPORTS
By Mike King and The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2014
Midway through winter, a chilly fog surrounded Theaux Le Gardeur's shop. Hardly anyone would be out on the Gunpowder River that day, he said. But he didn't need the river or sunlight. He stood behind his fly-fishing store clutching three rods: graphite, glass and bamboo. One by one, he tossed them back with his forearm and flicked them forward, eliciting the characteristic swish of fly line cutting through air. Each rod carried the line, bounced back quickly and delivered the fly far ahead of Le Gardeur, depositing the insect imitations onto the slick grass next to Backwater Angler.
NEWS
By Pat Emory and Pat Emory,Special to The Sun | January 3, 1991
ROCK HALL -- A full moon was just beginning to set on a still-dark Chesapeake Bay yesterday when, for the first time in five years, commercial fisherman Ronnie Fithian and his crew laid off their drift nets just south of the Bay Bridge.It took only a few minutes for the 400 yards of white nylon mesh net to disappear off the stern of the fiberglass workboat. Lead weights quickly pulled it 65 feet down into some of the deepest and warmest waters in the Upper Chesapeake, where schools of rockfish once were commonly found in the dead of winter.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | November 9, 2005
Should fishermen be able to own, buy and sell fish like stocks and bonds - BEFORE they catch them? That's the idea behind individual fishing quotas, the latest market-based environmental solution to get political traction. IFQs, used in New Zealand, Alaska, British Columbia and elsewhere, give individual watermen an exclusive share of the legal catch for a particular species, generally based on what they caught in the past. Fishermen can catch their quota in a few weeks, if they can, and then do something else.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,London Bureau of The Sun | June 25, 1995
NEWLYN, England -- "The Bloody Nut of Newlyn" taught his son well.Michael Williams would laugh at gales and set a course with nothing more than his watch, compass, map and guile, using wire stretched tight to hear the "ping-ping" of a school of fish waiting to be hauled from the sea.Now, the father remains ashore, as the son named Shaun sets sail, carrying on a 250-year-old family fishing tradition now hooked up to satellites and computers and bound by...
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 13, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- Why is the 1990 recreational season for striped bass ending Sunday at 8 p.m.? The basic reason, according to sources in the Department of Natural Resources and on the Striped Bass Advisory Board, is simple enough: Too many fishermen caught too many fish.But the explanation of why so many fishermen caught so many fish in so little time is a more complicated matter -- and one that has not been fully researched by fisheries managers.BIt seems there are three major factors that will close the fishery 10 days into a five-week season: The population of striped bass in the bay is healthy and large, the rockfish being caught are big and fishing areas in the Chesapeake and its tributaries were not restricted for this first season in more than five years.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2013
Sharing is often considered a good thing. But ask fishermen to share their catch, especially of Maryland's state fish, and things can get testy - with seafood consumers on the hook for how it plays out. Maryland is changing the way striped bass are caught for sale, ending decades of regulating the popular Chesapeake Bay fish by limiting the times when it can be harvested. Starting Jan. 1, commercial fishermen will have individual quotas of striped bass they can catch almost any time, not just in the relative handful of days permitted this year.
SPORTS
By Brian Compere, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
When Charlie Schneider came back one day in June after being out fishing near his Tilghman Island home, he noticed he was getting chills. His left ankle itched and got worse and worse through the evening. It eventually started to throb a bit, and he couldn't sleep. At 2 a.m., he asked his wife to get an ice pack before discovering that his ankle had swollen to twice its normal size. He didn't know what had caused the reaction, but his decision to go straight to the hospital ultimately helped save his legs - and his life.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
The Coast Guard suspended its search Thursday for two men missing in waters about 15 miles off the coast of Assateague Island after their fishing boat sank a day earlier. The broken-down fishing vessel was battling 20-foot waves and 50 mph wind gusts in the Atlantic Ocean when a wave knocked North Carolina fisherman Patrick Small off the deck. From the water, Small saw another wave strike the boat, shearing off the pilot house with two other men inside, he told rescuers. The men, Walter Tate, 80, and his nephew, Stephen Tate, 60, of New Bern, N.C., were deemed lost at sea after a search at first light Thursday found nothing but debris, including the floating front half of the vessel, Coast Guard officials said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
In a move hailed by conservationists, East Coast regulators ordered Friday a 20 percent reduction in the commercial catch of Atlantic menhaden, despite warnings that the cutback would cost some fishermen their jobs and may affect crabbers in the Chesapeake Bay. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, meeting before a packed ballroom of partisans in a Southeast Baltimore hotel, ended years of debate over whether the fish were in trouble and...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Cary deRussy, the former publisher of Fishing in Maryland magazine, died of emphysema complications Oct. 10 at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. The former Mays Chapel resident was 70. Born Wilson Cary Nicholas deRussy in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton, he was a 1960 graduate of St. Paul's School, where he was on the wrestling, cross country and tennis teams. He earned a photography degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1964. Family members said that during the Vietnam War, he joined the CIA and spent two years in Saigon working with the Special Forces.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2012
Richard N. Novotny Sr., former executive director of the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association who also lobbied on behalf of state recreational fishermen, died Sunday of kidney failure at Ivy Hall Geriatric & Rehabilitation Center in Middle River. The longtime Essex resident was 67. "He was highly regarded, and when Rich was in a leadership role, he helped form a strong relationship between [the Department of Natural Resources] and the Maryland Saltwater Sportfishing Association.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | November 13, 1992
Fiery speeches cut through the smoke-filled room as more than 90 sport and tournament fishermen, along with several tackle shop owners, met in Hampstead this week to angrily demand the reopening of Baltimore's reservoirs to boating.By the end of the evening, many of the fishermen had decided to join the local group that sponsored the meeting, to push government officials on reservoir policies and become what one leader called "the anglers' voice."Fishermen from Carroll, neighboring counties, and Pennsylvania, packed the Hampstead Fire Hall for the meeting Wednesday night.
NEWS
By THE BOSTON GLOBE | November 3, 1996
More than 160 Northeastern fishermen, representing at least a third of the region's active groundfishing fleet, have applied to sell their boats to the federal government under a $23 million program aimed at sharply reducing pressure on Georges Bank and other depleted fishing grounds.Officials at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) said they hope to acquire at least 80 of the boats by mid-1997, sinking or scrapping some, while diverting others to research or other nonfishing uses.
SPORTS
January 7, 2012
The 38th East Coast Commercial Fishermen's & Aquaculture Trade Exposition will be held Friday through next Sunday at the Roland E. Powell Convention Center in Ocean City . More than 50 vendors are expected to have their wares on display during the weekend event, which is expected to attract commercial fishermen, charter boat captains, aquaculturists, scientists and educators. Among the events held during the weekend will be seminars for aquaculturists and commercial fishing.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
Something positive resulted from last month's battle with Mother Nature: more places to catch trout this fall. More than 27,000 trout will be stocked throughout the state starting this month. Most of the trout will be either rainbow or golden trout weighing an average of one pound each. There will also be about 1,500 brown trout weighing about a pound each, as well as 300 rainbow and golden trout weighing two to three pounds each. Approximately 1,000 additional trout will be donated by The Freshwater Institute in West Virginia, a research facility.
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