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By Lou Cedrone | September 27, 1991
"THE FISHER King" plays, part of the time, as though it were shot in a revolving door. It also wanders all over the place and is perhaps too long for its own good, but if you stick with it (some people did walk out midway), you won't be sorry.You should, in fact, be extremely pleased that you remained with the film, remained long enough to come away with the impression that this is a bizarre, hilarious and very touching film.If one word can be used to describe it, it is sweet. Another is chaotic, but then it was directed by Terry Gilliam, former member of the Monty Python group, a man who has already established a reputation for doing different films ("Time Bandits," "Brazil," "Baron Munchausen")
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | March 13, 2009
NBC is heavily promoting its new Sunday night drama, Kings, as a modern-day version of David vs. Goliath. Actually, it is far more Fisher King Myth and Hero Quest than Old Testament. But, hey, you don't need to be a mythologist to know this is a series without a heart, soul or hardly any entertainment value. Outside of the always-intriguing Ian McShane, of Deadwood fame, there is not an actor to be found in the four hours made available for preview who will make you believe for two seconds in the reality of their characters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | September 27, 1991
Jack Lucas is a shock DJ in New York who thinks he's about to make it big in a TV sitcom. "Well, forgiiiiiiive me!" he keeps repeating from the script -- a phrase that will become a trademark in the mouth of another actor because Jack is not destined to deliver it.What derails Jack's plans is that one of his nerdy listeners takes one of the shock jock's offhand remarks too seriously and, with a shotgun, proceeds to off most of the patrons of a midtown watering...
NEWS
October 28, 1992
A CASE of life imitating art? Or was it?In the 1991 film, "The Fisher King," actor Jeff Bridges plays an egotistical, abrasive "shock jock" on a New York "talk radio" station. On the air, he mindlessly tells one of his nerdy callers that yuppies deserve to die. The listener totes off to a yuppie bar and guns down several patrons.Recently, Howard Stern, the egotistical, abrasive "shock jock," whose show is syndicated from New York to Baltimore, Philadelphia and several other markets, found himself having to ponder the freakish death of a woman he had involved in his radio gags.
FEATURES
By Tom Jacobs and Tom Jacobs,Los Angeles Daily News | September 23, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- When producer Lynda Obst began reading the script for "The Fisher King," she was evaluating it solely for its box-office potential. Her initial judgment: It didn't have much.But as she kept reading, something happened."It got me on a deeper level than my evaluating commercial material," she recalled. "It just got under my skin. I was weeping."I realized I was really late for where I had to be that Saturday afternoon. But I couldn't stop reading the script. So I took it with me [in the car]
NEWS
October 28, 1992
A CASE of life imitating art? Or was it?In the 1991 film, "The Fisher King," actor Jeff Bridges plays an egotistical, abrasive "shock jock" on a New York "talk radio" station. On the air, he mindlessly tells one of his nerdy callers that yuppies deserve to die. The listener totes off to a yuppie bar and guns down several patrons.Recently, Howard Stern, the egotistical, abrasive "shock jock," whose show is syndicated from New York to Baltimore, Philadelphia and several other markets, found himself having to ponder the freakish death of a woman he had involved in his radio gags.
FEATURES
February 20, 1992
Here is a complete list of nominees for the 64th annual Academy Awards announced yesterday:Picture: "Beauty and the Beast," "Bugsy," "JFK," "The Prince of Tides," "The Silence of the Lambs."Actor: Warren Beatty, "Bugsy"; Robert De Niro, "Cape Fear"; Anthony Hopkins, "The Silence of the Lambs"; Nick Nolte, "The Prince of Tides"; Robin Williams, "The Fisher King."Actress: Geena Davis, "Thelma & Louise"; Laura Dern, "Rambling Rose"; Jodie Foster, "The Silence of the Lambs"; Bette Midler, "For the Boys"; Susan Sarandon, "Thelma & Louise."
FEATURES
By Ryan Murphy and Ryan Murphy,Knight-Ridder | September 27, 1991
ROBIN WILLIAMS is wearing a T-shirt that says "Look Don't Stare," but it's hard not to.Moments after sitting down to promote his new movie, "The Fisher King," his quiet persona switches into untamed hobgoblin, and Williams becomes a manic creature, all strange voices, wired mannerisms and lethal observations.Take, for instance, his off-the-cuff riffs on the following topics:On Julia Roberts' breakup with fiance Kiefer Sutherland: "Why'd it fail, babe? Come on, tell me. And can I have the gift back?
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | March 13, 2009
NBC is heavily promoting its new Sunday night drama, Kings, as a modern-day version of David vs. Goliath. Actually, it is far more Fisher King Myth and Hero Quest than Old Testament. But, hey, you don't need to be a mythologist to know this is a series without a heart, soul or hardly any entertainment value. Outside of the always-intriguing Ian McShane, of Deadwood fame, there is not an actor to be found in the four hours made available for preview who will make you believe for two seconds in the reality of their characters.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | September 28, 1991
In the Sept. 28 Saturday section, Lea Gilmore was incorrectly listed as playing the role of Queenie in the TowsonTowne Dinner Theater production of "Show Boat." The role is being played by Sheila M. Ford. The Sun regrets the error.TELEVISIONTuned up for new season "Cars, cars, cars, all over the world . . ." went an upbeat old Paul Simon song lyric, and the universal interest in motorized vehicles is the reason behind the success of "MotorWeek." The consumer-oriented series is produced at Maryland Public Television for weekly dissemination on PBS stations across the nation, and launches its 10th season today (5 p.m. on MPT)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 29, 1992
Is it that time of year again, already? How did 365 days race by so quickly? Time flies when you're having fun, eh, moviegoers? And yes, indeed, tomorrow night is the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Award ceremony, better known as the Oscars, that annual orgy of vulgarity, earnestness, self-promotion, cleavage and whimsy that nevertheless will manage to be as mesmerizing as any movie this year. The key is Sincerity: Once Hollywood learned how to fake it, all good things followed.
FEATURES
February 20, 1992
Here is a complete list of nominees for the 64th annual Academy Awards announced yesterday:Picture: "Beauty and the Beast," "Bugsy," "JFK," "The Prince of Tides," "The Silence of the Lambs."Actor: Warren Beatty, "Bugsy"; Robert De Niro, "Cape Fear"; Anthony Hopkins, "The Silence of the Lambs"; Nick Nolte, "The Prince of Tides"; Robin Williams, "The Fisher King."Actress: Geena Davis, "Thelma & Louise"; Laura Dern, "Rambling Rose"; Jodie Foster, "The Silence of the Lambs"; Bette Midler, "For the Boys"; Susan Sarandon, "Thelma & Louise."
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | December 27, 1991
THE MOVIE industry seems to save the best for last. Four of the Top 10 films of the year, as judged here, were released in recent weeks. One has not yet made it to this city but because it has been screened in advance and has already opened in other cities, we'll include it among the ''Top 10.''The best of 1991 (only one man's opinion) are:''Hamlet'' -- Mad Max as the Melancholy Dane? Yes, and Mel Gibson, under the direction of Franco Zeffirelli, did exceptionally well.''City Slickers'' -- A very amusing comedy starring Billy Crystal as one of three New Jersey citizens who go on a vacation to a dude ranch where they take part in a cattle drive.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | September 28, 1991
In the Sept. 28 Saturday section, Lea Gilmore was incorrectly listed as playing the role of Queenie in the TowsonTowne Dinner Theater production of "Show Boat." The role is being played by Sheila M. Ford. The Sun regrets the error.TELEVISIONTuned up for new season "Cars, cars, cars, all over the world . . ." went an upbeat old Paul Simon song lyric, and the universal interest in motorized vehicles is the reason behind the success of "MotorWeek." The consumer-oriented series is produced at Maryland Public Television for weekly dissemination on PBS stations across the nation, and launches its 10th season today (5 p.m. on MPT)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | September 27, 1991
Jack Lucas is a shock DJ in New York who thinks he's about to make it big in a TV sitcom. "Well, forgiiiiiiive me!" he keeps repeating from the script -- a phrase that will become a trademark in the mouth of another actor because Jack is not destined to deliver it.What derails Jack's plans is that one of his nerdy listeners takes one of the shock jock's offhand remarks too seriously and, with a shotgun, proceeds to off most of the patrons of a midtown watering...
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 27, 1991
"THE FISHER King" plays, part of the time, as though it were shot in a revolving door. It also wanders all over the place and is perhaps too long for its own good, but if you stick with it (some people did walk out midway), you won't be sorry.You should, in fact, be extremely pleased that you remained with the film, remained long enough to come away with the impression that this is a bizarre, hilarious and very touching film.If one word can be used to describe it, it is sweet. Another is chaotic, but then it was directed by Terry Gilliam, former member of the Monty Python group, a man who has already established a reputation for doing different films ("Time Bandits," "Brazil," "Baron Munchausen")
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | March 29, 1992
Is it that time of year again, already? How did 365 days race by so quickly? Time flies when you're having fun, eh, moviegoers? And yes, indeed, tomorrow night is the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Award ceremony, better known as the Oscars, that annual orgy of vulgarity, earnestness, self-promotion, cleavage and whimsy that nevertheless will manage to be as mesmerizing as any movie this year. The key is Sincerity: Once Hollywood learned how to fake it, all good things followed.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | December 27, 1991
THE MOVIE industry seems to save the best for last. Four of the Top 10 films of the year, as judged here, were released in recent weeks. One has not yet made it to this city but because it has been screened in advance and has already opened in other cities, we'll include it among the ''Top 10.''The best of 1991 (only one man's opinion) are:''Hamlet'' -- Mad Max as the Melancholy Dane? Yes, and Mel Gibson, under the direction of Franco Zeffirelli, did exceptionally well.''City Slickers'' -- A very amusing comedy starring Billy Crystal as one of three New Jersey citizens who go on a vacation to a dude ranch where they take part in a cattle drive.
FEATURES
By Ryan Murphy and Ryan Murphy,Knight-Ridder | September 27, 1991
ROBIN WILLIAMS is wearing a T-shirt that says "Look Don't Stare," but it's hard not to.Moments after sitting down to promote his new movie, "The Fisher King," his quiet persona switches into untamed hobgoblin, and Williams becomes a manic creature, all strange voices, wired mannerisms and lethal observations.Take, for instance, his off-the-cuff riffs on the following topics:On Julia Roberts' breakup with fiance Kiefer Sutherland: "Why'd it fail, babe? Come on, tell me. And can I have the gift back?
FEATURES
By Tom Jacobs and Tom Jacobs,Los Angeles Daily News | September 23, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- When producer Lynda Obst began reading the script for "The Fisher King," she was evaluating it solely for its box-office potential. Her initial judgment: It didn't have much.But as she kept reading, something happened."It got me on a deeper level than my evaluating commercial material," she recalled. "It just got under my skin. I was weeping."I realized I was really late for where I had to be that Saturday afternoon. But I couldn't stop reading the script. So I took it with me [in the car]
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