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By CANDUS THOMSON | May 4, 2008
Albert Powell raised a big, fat rainbow trout. Charlie Gougeon put that fish in the Little Gunpowder River. Chris Shaw reeled it in. His dad, Robert, enjoyed a nice trout dinner. How's that for chain of custody? It's not often in telling the story of a noteworthy catch - and I've passed along a bunch to you - that one can say with a great degree of certainty how a specific fish arrived at the end of a particular hook and then to a single plate. So, indulge me this one time. Because this is not only a story of how Shaw acquired his bragging rights, but also a story of the extraordinary work done by the biologists and field staff at the Maryland Fisheries Service.
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NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | August 30, 2009
Charles B. Bailey of Hagerstown has a tale to tell, and I agree it's a tale worth telling. He teased it in an e-mail as "A (feel) good fish story," and a good fish story usually says more about the person doing the telling than the story being told. Bailey's story has a hero (himself), described as a dedicated public defender who used a magnet tied to a string to retrieve a revolver that his client had thrown into Antietam Creek after committing an armed robbery. Bailey said he went to extraordinary lengths to get his client a lighter sentence than was given his accomplice, a deal that he said involved getting the weapon off the street.
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SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 23, 2009
OCEAN CITY - Fishing records are as permanent as an ice cube on a city sidewalk in August. In a blink of an eye, marks that once seemed unreachable are gathered in and tossed away. That's not the case in other sports. Sometimes, it takes a plugger like baseball's Pete Rose years to grind out the hits to pass Ty Cobb's long-standing benchmark of 4,191. And challengers to Ted Williams' .406 season average (the last such mark above .400) and Joe DiMaggio's record hitting streak of 56 games - both set in 1941 - learn every year just how formidable those numbers are. Mother Nature has a lot to do with fishing records.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson | August 23, 2009
OCEAN CITY - Fishing records are as permanent as an ice cube on a city sidewalk in August. In a blink of an eye, marks that once seemed unreachable are gathered in and tossed away. That's not the case in other sports. Sometimes, it takes a plugger like baseball's Pete Rose years to grind out the hits to pass Ty Cobb's long-standing benchmark of 4,191. And challengers to Ted Williams' .406 season average (the last such mark above .400) and Joe DiMaggio's record hitting streak of 56 games - both set in 1941 - learn every year just how formidable those numbers are. Mother Nature has a lot to do with fishing records.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaimee Rose and Jaimee Rose,Sun Staff | July 19, 2001
THIS fish story, which is not about bragging men in rubber boots, and does not involve lengthy discussions of lures and lakes and fish this big, is actually true. Baltimore's "Fish out of Water" sculptures have been cropping up on sidewalks around the city since late April. If you haven't seen any of them, we're sorry, and we wonder where you've been. Because this school of fish is now 120 or so strong (and there are just as many fish puns floating about town, it seems). Following is everything you never knew you wanted to know about the finny creatures.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | May 14, 1993
In three hours, a handful of state fishery experts using specialized equipment failed yesterday to duplicate the achievement of a single, 8-year-old boy with a fishing pole: catch a piranha.Michael McManus of Bowie landed an 11-inch piranha Saturday at Allen Pond Park in Prince George's County. Yesterday morning, he and his father, Steve McManus, watched as state Department of Natural Resources biologists sent mild electrical shocks through the five-acre pond, causing stunned fish to float to the surface where they were examined.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
Richard Kelly, 81, a Florida politician who became the only Republican congressman convicted in the Abscam corruption scandal a quarter century ago, died Aug. 22 at a nursing home in Stevensville, Mont., where he had moved in retirement. Mr. Kelly, a former federal prosecutor and judge, was elected to Congress in 1974 and was re-elected twice from a central Florida district that stretched from Orlando to Clearwater. He lost a bid for re-nomination in 1980 after he and six other members of Congress were caught in the Abscam undercover bribery investigation, in which FBI agents posed as Arab sheiks buying influence.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | August 30, 2009
Charles B. Bailey of Hagerstown has a tale to tell, and I agree it's a tale worth telling. He teased it in an e-mail as "A (feel) good fish story," and a good fish story usually says more about the person doing the telling than the story being told. Bailey's story has a hero (himself), described as a dedicated public defender who used a magnet tied to a string to retrieve a revolver that his client had thrown into Antietam Creek after committing an armed robbery. Bailey said he went to extraordinary lengths to get his client a lighter sentence than was given his accomplice, a deal that he said involved getting the weapon off the street.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 28, 1994
The other night I grilled a Maryland rockfish and covered it with salsa. The dish was quite good, but it broke tradition.Back in the days when wild rockfish, or striped bass, were scarce, I was afraid to try new ways to cook it. So year after year, I simply brushed the fish with a mixture of olive oil, lemon juice and a pinch of salt, rolled it in bread crumbs, and put it under a broiler until the meat got flaky.This traditional treatment delivered a wonderful, slightly sweet flavor. But I got bored with it. I was afraid of trying anything new because the fish was hard to get.Recently, however, the bay has been swimming with adult rockfish.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | May 9, 1993
A balky boat engine had delayed the first rockfish trip of the season for three days, but by Monday evening the fuel and ignition problems had been sorted out, and the rods and tackle had been stored aboard in preparation for the following morning.The season was new, the boat was new (to me, at least) and the tackle box was stocked with traditional silver or white No. 21 Tony spoons and a newcomer, a fat, white lure called the Equalizer Bunker spoon.On Tuesday morning, two rods were rigged with big Tonys, one silver with reflector prism tape and the other solid white.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 4, 2008
Albert Powell raised a big, fat rainbow trout. Charlie Gougeon put that fish in the Little Gunpowder River. Chris Shaw reeled it in. His dad, Robert, enjoyed a nice trout dinner. How's that for chain of custody? It's not often in telling the story of a noteworthy catch - and I've passed along a bunch to you - that one can say with a great degree of certainty how a specific fish arrived at the end of a particular hook and then to a single plate. So, indulge me this one time. Because this is not only a story of how Shaw acquired his bragging rights, but also a story of the extraordinary work done by the biologists and field staff at the Maryland Fisheries Service.
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | October 8, 2006
Readers who picked up the Sept. 27 edition of The Sun were greeted at the top of Page One with a blown-up photo of a very toothy fish accompanied by a provocative headline: "A piranha in Dundalk." The next day The Sun began receiving what eventually became a flood of reader e-mails claiming that the Page One piranha was all teeth and no bite - in fact, a red-bellied pacu, a vegetarian cousin of the meat-eating fish. The paper's editors were skeptical at first, because the fish in question had been identified as a piranha by biologists at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources and at the National Aquarium in Washington.
NEWS
August 7, 2006
Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine deserves praise for his recent decision to restrict the harvest of menhaden. At first blush, placing an annual cap of 109,020 metric tons may not seem all that restrictive, but it required a commitment to the Chesapeake Bay's well-being and a political will sorely lacking in Virginia's legislature, which failed to pass the limit earlier this year. Menhaden isn't the region's most popular recreational species; it's too small, oily and bony for human tastes. But striped bass regard them much the same way Popeye's pal Wimpy looked upon hamburgers - research suggests stripers prefer to eat menhaden over most anything else.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | April 23, 2006
Some mornings when you wake up, the primal lizard part of your brain screams that you simply must go fishing before work. Otherwise you're liable to act on that fantasy of chasing a co-worker around the office with a nail gun. (Come on, admit it.) But after reading the paper and drinking coffee, you get dressed and head for the office, anyway. Not me. Not Friday. With the weekend forecast predicting nastiness, my little car turned off Route 29 in Howard County and drove straight to the parking lot at Centennial Lake.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
Richard Kelly, 81, a Florida politician who became the only Republican congressman convicted in the Abscam corruption scandal a quarter century ago, died Aug. 22 at a nursing home in Stevensville, Mont., where he had moved in retirement. Mr. Kelly, a former federal prosecutor and judge, was elected to Congress in 1974 and was re-elected twice from a central Florida district that stretched from Orlando to Clearwater. He lost a bid for re-nomination in 1980 after he and six other members of Congress were caught in the Abscam undercover bribery investigation, in which FBI agents posed as Arab sheiks buying influence.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | August 1, 2004
OCEAN CITY - Some people come here for the sun and sand. Some come because it's a family tradition. But this week, several hundred people are here because they hope to hook a million bucks. At the White Marlin Open, six-figure checks are the norm, and last year's winner, Doug Remsberg, walked off with $1.3 million for a 78.5-pound white. That's $16,611 a pound. "Not your average supermarket fish, is it?" says Jim Motsko, founder and director of the 31-year-old event, believed to be the largest and most lucrative billfish tournament in the world.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 26, 1999
This month the Baltimore Playwrights Festival is presenting works by its two most-produced playwrights -- Joe Dennison, whose anthology of one-acts can be seen at the Spotlighters, and Kathleen Barber, whose drama "Caz" opened Thursday at Fell's Point Corner Theatre. "Aquarium," Dennison's well-crafted bill of one-acts, is framed by a piece called "Prologue/Epilogue," in which two affable actors (James Edward Lee and Bruce Godfrey) grapple with performing a two-man version of Samuel Beckett's "Waiting for Godot."
NEWS
May 25, 1992
Fishing in the Sea of LifeThis is a fish story. No, this is not a story about the one that got away or the one you took home for supper last night. This is a story about some of the fish that swim in the "sea of life" and some of the people who champion them. There are the "halo fish," "political fish," "tax fish," "doomsday fish" and "reality fish.""Halo fish," supported by the Michael Oleskers of the world, aimlessly splash around in their school trying to hold their halo high for all to see. The tremendous energy they expend, constantly adjusting their halos, trying to convince everyone to believe what they espouse.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | June 29, 2003
It was about 18 months ago in a dreary Annapolis cafeteria that anglers and state fisheries biologists talked about the equally dismal state of the flounder population. Things, we were told, were not looking good. Crummy, in fact. Flounder pounders would just have to wait for the stock to replenish itself. Reaching a spawning biomass of 53,200 metric tons was critical. "We have a long way to go until flounder reach that target," warned Phil Jones of the Department of Natural Resources.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 30, 2003
Only an "m" separates Neo, the hero of The Matrix Reloaded, and Nemo, the hero of Finding Nemo, but an ocean of vitality and exuberance divides the Matrix sequel from the Pixar studio's latest work of computer-animation genius. Finding Nemo marks the first time that a Pixar team has tackled the murdered-parent, threatened-child scenario of borderline maudlin Disney classics such as Bambi. But co-director/co-writer Andrew Stanton has the wit to parallel the stories of a motherless clownfish, Nemo, and his over-protective father, Marlin, and to poke fun at familial bonds even as he celebrates them.
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