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NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,universal press syndicate | January 9, 2000
There's some strategy to making good seafood soup: Use good-quality fish or shellfish, add the ingredients in stages, and don't overcook. Fresh fish and shellfish should be mild-smelling, with no fishy odor or trace of ammonia, and the flesh should feel firm. If you buy previously frozen seafood, be sure it hasn't been defrosted longer than two days. Because a soup made with fish or seafood combines ingredients with varying cooking times, you'll need to add the different items in stages.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
— Amid warnings that slashing the striped bass catch by a third next year could devastate Chesapeake Bay commercial fishermen, Atlantic states regulators agreed Tuesday to consider reducing the catch more gradually over three years. Members of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission made so many other changes to a proposal for protecting Maryland's state fish from a troubling decline that they could not finish reviewing it until Wednesday — and likely put off taking final action by three months, until fall.
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NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
Let's cut to the chase: Any semi-serious chef would be delighted to have a copy of On Cooking: Techniques From Expert Chefs (Prentice Hall, $50). Stuffed with more than 900 recipes and expert tips from big-time chefs like Wolfgang Puck and Alfred Portale and a whole lot of less-well-known names, this heavyweight cookbook is a worthy kitchen addition for anyone who is serious about food. But there's a catch (isn't there always one?). While the book is instructive - there are long passages on basic techniques like filleting fish and grilling meat - this is not for the beginner or perhaps even the advanced beginner.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 31, 2009
In the most sweeping change for Maryland anglers in 25 years, tens of thousands of residents and vacationers who fish in the Chesapeake Bay or wet a line in the Atlantic Ocean or its coastal bays will be required to register with the federal government. The National Saltwater Angler Registry, authorized by Congress, is a new tool for scientists to get a better handle on the numbers of recreational anglers and migratory fish caught - part of their effort to protect species and rebuild dwindling stocks.
FEATURES
By Eating Well | March 3, 1993
Making soup used to be an all-day project, since homemade stock takes hours to prepare. But if you can find a canned stock you can cut hours off cooking time without compromising taste.The following nutritious soups can be prepared in less than an hour. Low-fat milk thickened with a bit of cornstarch gives "Down East" fish chowder body and creaminess -- without the cream. A slightly sweetened chicken broth gives Swedish cabbage soup with meatballs its delicate flavor, which is accompanied nicely by Swedish rye crisps.
FEATURES
By Jimmy Schmidt and Jimmy Schmidt,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 30, 1994
An old French technique for poaching fish in the oven results in a light and delicate texture in just a little splash of moisture. The fish is not only lean and healthy but also absolutely delicious.Here's how it works: You place the fish on a bed of vegetables in a skillet, splash with fish stock and white wine, then cover with parchment. Heat the skillet until the liquids begin to boil, then transfer to the oven to finish cooking.Serve with pan juices finished into a sauce.Why it tastes so good: Cooking fish in liquid preserves that moist, delicate and slightly resilient texture.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
— Amid warnings that slashing the striped bass catch by a third next year could devastate Chesapeake Bay commercial fishermen, Atlantic states regulators agreed Tuesday to consider reducing the catch more gradually over three years. Members of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission made so many other changes to a proposal for protecting Maryland's state fish from a troubling decline that they could not finish reviewing it until Wednesday — and likely put off taking final action by three months, until fall.
FEATURES
By Russ Parsons and By Russ Parsons,Los Angeles Times | February 9, 2000
It's shrimp to the rescue. Recipes for fish soup usually begin by telling you to make a fish stock using bones and scraps you get from your fishmonger. This is good advice; no question about it. The only problem is that finding fish bones and scraps -- heck, even finding a fishmonger -- is getting more and more difficult. For better or worse, most of us buy our fish at the supermarket. Though we have made great gains in accessibility this way, we have suffered the loss of some niceties.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2003
At the turn of the Jewish New Year, who can resist signs of renewal, or even miracles? With the New Year beginning Friday night, imagine the sense of wonder in turning to page 26 of a new cookbook, Kosher by Design, to find a vision in green, orange and white, a triple-layer wedge of delight and delicacy that could proudly be served by the finest cake baker. But wait a minute, it's not a slice of cake. It's ... Gefilte fish? The page heading, Tricolor Gefilte Fish, appears above this picture of loveliness, a disconnect of word and image that perhaps demands translation here.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | January 18, 1995
Fish and citrus fruit. It's a perfect marriage of flavors.And the time is ripe.I long to match citrus with fish, a symbiotic pairing that makes fish taste fabulous. Even "fishy" fish becomes mild-mannered when complemented with citrus.Fried calamari become a delicacy with a generous squeeze of lemon juice.Sauteed scallops can make your palate snap to attention when a splash of orange juice is lightly drizzled on top.Better yet, poach salmon fillets in a mixture of orange juice, shallots and a little fish stock (or clam juice)
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
The Chesapeake Bay's signature seafood species are in better straits than ocean fish because state regulations help to prevent overfishing. But experts say the bay's rockfish, oysters and crabs continue to face a mighty struggle against pollution and loss of habitat. A study in the journal Science, which will be released today, warns that marine life in the ocean is being overfished at such a rapid rate that all species are heading for a "global collapse" by the year 2048.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 2005
Clarification An article in the Dec. 28 issue of Taste featuring the best recipes of 2005 listed Stay-a-bed Stew as one that had appeared in Recipe Finder. The recipe is from The I Hate to Cook Book, by Peg Bracken. Throughout the year we try to bring our readers a wide variety of recipe and food ideas. As 2005 comes to an end, we take a look back through these pages to find our 12 favorite recipes of the year. The recipes we have selected made the cut for a variety of reasons. Perhaps it's the news that the slow cooker has had a rebirth or that a local chef has a new twist on chowder that highlights the bounty of the Chesapeake.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2003
At the turn of the Jewish New Year, who can resist signs of renewal, or even miracles? With the New Year beginning Friday night, imagine the sense of wonder in turning to page 26 of a new cookbook, Kosher by Design, to find a vision in green, orange and white, a triple-layer wedge of delight and delicacy that could proudly be served by the finest cake baker. But wait a minute, it's not a slice of cake. It's ... Gefilte fish? The page heading, Tricolor Gefilte Fish, appears above this picture of loveliness, a disconnect of word and image that perhaps demands translation here.
NEWS
By Kenneth R. Weiss and Kenneth R. Weiss,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 15, 2003
Industrial fishing fleets have systematically stripped 90 percent of the giant tuna, swordfish, marlin and other big fish from the world's oceans, according to a new study that suggests that the virtual collapse of these stocks - such as happened to the cod off New England - is a distinct possibility. Fishing fleets are competing for the remnants of the biggest fish in the oceans, concludes a 10-year research project reported in today's issue of the science journal Nature. "Fishermen used to go out and catch these phenomenally big fish," said Ransom A. Myers, fisheries biologist at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
Let's cut to the chase: Any semi-serious chef would be delighted to have a copy of On Cooking: Techniques From Expert Chefs (Prentice Hall, $50). Stuffed with more than 900 recipes and expert tips from big-time chefs like Wolfgang Puck and Alfred Portale and a whole lot of less-well-known names, this heavyweight cookbook is a worthy kitchen addition for anyone who is serious about food. But there's a catch (isn't there always one?). While the book is instructive - there are long passages on basic techniques like filleting fish and grilling meat - this is not for the beginner or perhaps even the advanced beginner.
FEATURES
By Russ Parsons and By Russ Parsons,Los Angeles Times | February 9, 2000
It's shrimp to the rescue. Recipes for fish soup usually begin by telling you to make a fish stock using bones and scraps you get from your fishmonger. This is good advice; no question about it. The only problem is that finding fish bones and scraps -- heck, even finding a fishmonger -- is getting more and more difficult. For better or worse, most of us buy our fish at the supermarket. Though we have made great gains in accessibility this way, we have suffered the loss of some niceties.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 28, 2005
Clarification An article in the Dec. 28 issue of Taste featuring the best recipes of 2005 listed Stay-a-bed Stew as one that had appeared in Recipe Finder. The recipe is from The I Hate to Cook Book, by Peg Bracken. Throughout the year we try to bring our readers a wide variety of recipe and food ideas. As 2005 comes to an end, we take a look back through these pages to find our 12 favorite recipes of the year. The recipes we have selected made the cut for a variety of reasons. Perhaps it's the news that the slow cooker has had a rebirth or that a local chef has a new twist on chowder that highlights the bounty of the Chesapeake.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | September 19, 1990
Captain Ahab was proved dead wrong when he went after Moby Dick. Captain Nemo encountered considerable misadventure 20,000 leagues under the sea. Now, the 1990 stock market having taken a plunge to the depths, some stalwart captains of investment have begun charting a stock-buying course which they hope is destined to provide a quality catch."
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,universal press syndicate | January 9, 2000
There's some strategy to making good seafood soup: Use good-quality fish or shellfish, add the ingredients in stages, and don't overcook. Fresh fish and shellfish should be mild-smelling, with no fishy odor or trace of ammonia, and the flesh should feel firm. If you buy previously frozen seafood, be sure it hasn't been defrosted longer than two days. Because a soup made with fish or seafood combines ingredients with varying cooking times, you'll need to add the different items in stages.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,Orange County Register | January 18, 1995
Fish and citrus fruit. It's a perfect marriage of flavors.And the time is ripe.I long to match citrus with fish, a symbiotic pairing that makes fish taste fabulous. Even "fishy" fish becomes mild-mannered when complemented with citrus.Fried calamari become a delicacy with a generous squeeze of lemon juice.Sauteed scallops can make your palate snap to attention when a splash of orange juice is lightly drizzled on top.Better yet, poach salmon fillets in a mixture of orange juice, shallots and a little fish stock (or clam juice)
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