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By Seattle Times | January 18, 1995
The following light-eating recipe, is a delicious new way to use boneless chicken breasts from "Cooking Under Wraps" by Nicole Routhier.Thai-Style Fajitas6 servingsCHICKEN:4 boneless and skinless chicken breast halves (about 1 1/4 pounds)1 medium clove garlic, peeled and minced1 medium shallot, peeled and mincedgrated peel of 1 lime2 tablespoons lime juice1 tablespoon fish sauce1/2 teaspoon sesame oil2 teaspoons brown sugar2 tablespoons minced cilantro6 flour tortillasPICKLED VEGETABLES:1/2 cup rice vinegar2 tablespoons sugar1 tablespoon fish sauce1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes1 large English cucumber, peeled, halved, seeded and cut into 1/4 -inch slices1 large carrot, peeled, halved and cut into 1/8 -inch thick slices1/2 medium red onion, very thinly sliced2 tablespoons minced cilantroCut chicken into very thin strips.
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By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,Chicago Tribune | June 11, 2008
This soup was inspired by some Thai peanut chicken sausage links. Tired of browning sausage whole, then serving it with a vegetable and some pasta or rice, I opted for soup. Taking the links out of their casings, I formed them into meatballs, then browned them. And I threw together some vegetables and seasonings that lent themselves to a Thai-inspired soup. But meatballs take too much time for a weeknight meal. Instead, brown the links, then cut into slices. Joe Gray writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
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By Regina Schrambling | November 19, 2006
Nicole Routhier included this braising recipe in her 1989 cookbook, The Foods of Vietnam. Lavish garlic, a little sugar and a good dose of fish sauce give pumpkin sweetness against that haunting undertone from the fish sauce. Regina Schrambling wrote this article for the Los Angeles Times, which provided the recipe analysis. Vietnamese Glazed Pumpkin Serves 4 to 6 -- Total time: 1 hour 1 (3-pound) cheese or pie pumpkin 1 tablespoon peanut oil 6 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 cup chicken stock 1 tablespoon Vietnamese fish sauce 2 tablespoons sugar freshly ground black pepper steamed rice (optional)
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By Donna Pierce | April 30, 2008
I once heard the founder of Glory Foods, the late Bill Williams, justify cooking with his company's Southern-inspired canned greens in a way that made me forever stop apologizing for shortcuts: "These won't be as good as the `Sunday best' greens you remember your mother making, but I guarantee they'll be the best Tuesday-night greens you ever rushed to prepare." I make the same claim for this recipe laced with my best weekday shortcuts. This quick fix has been known to draw raves from hungry family and friends as a quick weekday dinner.
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By NEWSDAY | April 9, 2006
Rice noodles, fish sauce and chili sauce can all be found in the Asian foods section of most supermarkets. THAI NOODLES WITH TOFU MAKES 4 SERVINGS 8 ounces wide rice stick noodles 1 / 2 cup ketchup 1 / 4 cup sugar 1 / 3 cup Asian fish sauce 1 / 4 teaspoon Asian chili sauce 2 tablespoons natural-style peanut butter 2 tablespoons canola oil, divided 1 (14-ounce) package firm tofu, cut in 3 / 4-inch cubes 1 green bell pepper, cut into thin strips 1 red bell pepper, cut into thin strips 1 cup shredded cabbage 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped peanuts 2 tablespoons cilantro leaves Cook the noodles in plenty of lightly salted boiling water according to package directions (6 to 8 minutes)
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By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | February 27, 2008
Mirin is a sweet, syrupy wine made from rice. It's particularly fine with grilled foods. When brushed over the hot food, the mirin becomes a glossy glaze; think of those skewers of chicken yakitori you get at the local Japanese restaurant. Mirin is low in alcohol and meant for cooking, not drinking. Here, its mild, honeyed flavor enhances the salmon's richness while melding well with the salt of the soy and fish sauces. The sweetness also plays up the smoky char of the grill pan. You can find mirin, fish sauce and soy sauce at Asian and specialty-food markets and, increasingly, in supermarkets.
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By Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid and Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid,Eating Well United Feature Syndicate | May 21, 1995
Bring a Thai salad to a potluck supper, place it on the table with all the other dishes and watch discreetly as people taste it.On their faces there is first a slight pucker, a moment of surprise at the combination of salty fish sauce, hot chilies and sour lime. Then there is pleasure, the delight that comes from eating a morsel of red snapper tinged with a crispy fried leaf of basil, or a tender piece of squid trailing a hint of lemon grass and ginger.The savoriness of Thai salads does not depend on one particular ingredient, but on the blend of salty, sour, sweet and hot seasonings.
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By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
Modern Asian Flavors: A Taste of Shanghai By Richard Wong Quick & Easy Vietnamese: 75 Everyday Recipes By Nancie McDermott Chronicle Books / 2006 / $19.95 This cookbook lives up to its name. A former Peace Corps volunteer in rural Thailand, McDermott returned smitten by Southeast Asian cuisine, and is now a food writer and cooking teacher in North Carolina. The recipes won't overwhelm the everyday chef who lacks expertise and hours of preparation time. The book sticks with the basics of Vietnamese food -- no fusion or pan-Asian here.
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By GAIL FORMAN | May 29, 1994
Spicy foods make you warm when it's cold outside, cool when it's hot. Hot spices awaken the appetite while stimulating the release of endorphins that make you feel relaxed and satisfied. So no wonder Thai cooking, which uses hot spices to perfection, is one of America's most popular ethnic cuisines.In classical Thai cooking a typical daily meal is not divided into courses. Soup, such as the celebrated shrimp with lemon-grass broth, is a beverage eaten throughout the meal. And all dishes are served at once -- perhaps a raw vegetable salad, stir-fried vegetables, spicy curried meat, grilled seafood and steamed rice, or khow.
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By Peter D. Franklin and Peter D. Franklin,Contributing Writer | September 23, 1992
One of the problems American cooks have in trying to duplicate Far Eastern dishes is finding all the ingredients. After all, the Far East is really far.For many reasons, the Chinese seem to have bridged the gastronomic gap better than the Japanese, and the Japanese have gained more ground here than, say, the Burmese or the Thai. Yet it is the latter ethnic group that is gaining culinary attention with the recent publication of several books on Thai cooking. The latest editions are "Real Thai: The Best of Thailand's Regional Cooking," by Nancie McDermott (Chronicle Books, paperback $9.95)
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | February 27, 2008
Mirin is a sweet, syrupy wine made from rice. It's particularly fine with grilled foods. When brushed over the hot food, the mirin becomes a glossy glaze; think of those skewers of chicken yakitori you get at the local Japanese restaurant. Mirin is low in alcohol and meant for cooking, not drinking. Here, its mild, honeyed flavor enhances the salmon's richness while melding well with the salt of the soy and fish sauces. The sweetness also plays up the smoky char of the grill pan. You can find mirin, fish sauce and soy sauce at Asian and specialty-food markets and, increasingly, in supermarkets.
NEWS
By Marge Perry and Marge Perry,Newsday | March 25, 2007
Flank steak is lean, flavorful, and fast and easy to cook. Because it is lean, it should be cooked with care: It is at its most moist and flavorful served medium rare. Regardless of how you cook it, flank steak should be cut across the grain into very thin strips before serving. While the ingredients list for this recipe may be long, the time it takes to prepare this dish is very short. PAN-SEARED FLANK STEAK WITH THAI DRESSING Serves 4 1 tablespoon sugar 1 tablespoon lime juice 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons water 1/8 teaspoon Asian chile paste (or to taste)
NEWS
By Regina Schrambling | November 19, 2006
Nicole Routhier included this braising recipe in her 1989 cookbook, The Foods of Vietnam. Lavish garlic, a little sugar and a good dose of fish sauce give pumpkin sweetness against that haunting undertone from the fish sauce. Regina Schrambling wrote this article for the Los Angeles Times, which provided the recipe analysis. Vietnamese Glazed Pumpkin Serves 4 to 6 -- Total time: 1 hour 1 (3-pound) cheese or pie pumpkin 1 tablespoon peanut oil 6 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 cup chicken stock 1 tablespoon Vietnamese fish sauce 2 tablespoons sugar freshly ground black pepper steamed rice (optional)
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 19, 2006
The zingy fresh flavors of Thai cuisine really fascinate me, but I've hesitated a little about cooking Thai at home, thinking it was too complicated. Then I saw several recipes for laab - sometimes spelled larb, laap or lob - and realized I could easily make one of the first Thai dishes I ever tasted. My chicken version is really speedy, and it's low in fat. While it's often served with steamed sticky rice, I usually eat it as a casual wrap using Boston lettuce leaves. The contrast of spicy chicken and cool mint and lime, slightly chewy chicken and tender greens never fails to please me. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which supplied the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
Modern Asian Flavors: A Taste of Shanghai By Richard Wong Quick & Easy Vietnamese: 75 Everyday Recipes By Nancie McDermott Chronicle Books / 2006 / $19.95 This cookbook lives up to its name. A former Peace Corps volunteer in rural Thailand, McDermott returned smitten by Southeast Asian cuisine, and is now a food writer and cooking teacher in North Carolina. The recipes won't overwhelm the everyday chef who lacks expertise and hours of preparation time. The book sticks with the basics of Vietnamese food -- no fusion or pan-Asian here.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | April 9, 2006
Rice noodles, fish sauce and chili sauce can all be found in the Asian foods section of most supermarkets. THAI NOODLES WITH TOFU MAKES 4 SERVINGS 8 ounces wide rice stick noodles 1 / 2 cup ketchup 1 / 4 cup sugar 1 / 3 cup Asian fish sauce 1 / 4 teaspoon Asian chili sauce 2 tablespoons natural-style peanut butter 2 tablespoons canola oil, divided 1 (14-ounce) package firm tofu, cut in 3 / 4-inch cubes 1 green bell pepper, cut into thin strips 1 red bell pepper, cut into thin strips 1 cup shredded cabbage 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped peanuts 2 tablespoons cilantro leaves Cook the noodles in plenty of lightly salted boiling water according to package directions (6 to 8 minutes)
NEWS
By Marge Perry and Marge Perry,Newsday | March 25, 2007
Flank steak is lean, flavorful, and fast and easy to cook. Because it is lean, it should be cooked with care: It is at its most moist and flavorful served medium rare. Regardless of how you cook it, flank steak should be cut across the grain into very thin strips before serving. While the ingredients list for this recipe may be long, the time it takes to prepare this dish is very short. PAN-SEARED FLANK STEAK WITH THAI DRESSING Serves 4 1 tablespoon sugar 1 tablespoon lime juice 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons water 1/8 teaspoon Asian chile paste (or to taste)
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By Ruth Cousineau and Ruth Cousineau,Eating Well Magazine | July 8, 1998
Even after the health revolution, you can still enjoy beef without losing your head."Steakhouse Sales Sizzle," "Beef Is Back," proclaim the headlines, as story after story details the resurgence of red meat on the American food scene. We are, it seems - despite health recommendations to eat less - a country crazy for beef. According to the latest figures available from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, per-capita beef consumption was 63.9 pounds in 1997, higher, indeed, than any other meat, including chicken.
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS | December 14, 2005
Something about skewers just says casual. Combine casual with chicken - especially boneless, skinless chicken breasts - and dinner is guaranteed to be quick and easy. This skewered chicken gives a nod to more traditional grilled Indonesian chicken satay. But because we want dinner on the table fast, we've got no time to marinate before we cook. Instead, rub the chicken with a simple spice rub to add one layer of flavor, then season its dipping sauce more highly than usual. If you've got time, you can certainly grill these.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | July 4, 2004
While teaching in Cleveland this spring, a good friend and former chef I had not seen in several years invited me to lunch. The talented cook served a light main course he called Pacific Rim Salad. A glorious entree with Asian flavorings, the salad was assembled with a trio of greens -- romaine, basil and mint -- that were combined with cucumbers, shallots, bell peppers and grape tomatoes. These ingredients were tossed with a distinctive sweet and sour dressing made of lime juice, sugar and Thai fish sauce accented with bits of ginger root, garlic and red pepper flakes.
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