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NEWS
June 24, 1993
Fish ladder planned at Lake WaterfordWith the completion of a new $1.98 million dam, the county Department of Parks and Recreation has refilled Lake Waterford and could begin restocking it with catfish soon. Anglers will have to wait until next spring, however, before the lake is restocked with trout, park officials said.Although the dam was completed this month, workers are still building a state-mandated fish ladder over the dam, said Jay Cuccia, assistant to the county park administrator.
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NEWS
June 17, 2013
You would probably have to over the age of 50 to remember when late May and early June meant shad in Maryland. In those days, the spawning season for American shad and river herring brought young and old to the banks of Maryland tributaries to catch their share of fish once so bountiful that they were shipped by the rail car load from Crisfield to Baltimore. Shad filet and shad roe were as big a part of the Chesapeake Bay's seafood bounty as anything on the plate today. They fed the American colonists all along the East Coast.
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NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | May 16, 1991
The Army is helping thousands of migratory fish reproduce.Officials at Fort George G. Meade unveiled a "fish ladder" yesterday that will allow ocean-going fish to swim upstream to their traditional spawning grounds for the first time in 50 years.For five decades, schools of blueback herring, hickory shad and alewife have been thwarted by a dam, which the U.S. Army built across the Little Patuxent River to supply the Odenton base with water.Army contractors built a specially engineered metal and concrete staircase this spring to help the fish cross the dam and continue their 2,000-mile journey from the Atlantic Ocean to the river's upper reaches.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Fish making the spring spawning run from the Chesapeake Bay upstream into the Patapsco River swim about 11 miles of cool, shallow, flowing water before hitting a concrete wall nearly three stories high: the Bloede Dam. The wildlife obstacle and human safety hazard has stood for more than a century in Patapsco Valley State Park, but its days could be numbered. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is continuing a years-long effort to clear the Patapsco of dams that have outlived their original industrial uses and now turns its attention to Bloede.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Fish making the spring spawning run from the Chesapeake Bay upstream into the Patapsco River swim about 11 miles of cool, shallow, flowing water before hitting a concrete wall nearly three stories high: the Bloede Dam. The wildlife obstacle and human safety hazard has stood for more than a century in Patapsco Valley State Park, but its days could be numbered. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources is continuing a years-long effort to clear the Patapsco of dams that have outlived their original industrial uses and now turns its attention to Bloede.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
Lisa Farley and her two daughters braved rain and cold temperatures yesterday morning to do their part in helping a handful of migrating fish complete a 2,000-mile journey from the depths of the Atlantic to their ancestral spawning grounds in the upper reaches of the Patapsco River. Bundled in raincoats and gloves, the family measured the water temperature and helped crank the wheel to open the fish ladder at Daniels Dam on the Patapsco, allowing shad, herring and perch to swim upstream and spawn.
NEWS
June 17, 2013
You would probably have to over the age of 50 to remember when late May and early June meant shad in Maryland. In those days, the spawning season for American shad and river herring brought young and old to the banks of Maryland tributaries to catch their share of fish once so bountiful that they were shipped by the rail car load from Crisfield to Baltimore. Shad filet and shad roe were as big a part of the Chesapeake Bay's seafood bounty as anything on the plate today. They fed the American colonists all along the East Coast.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | March 8, 1994
A few successive warm days early in March bring fishermen out to creeks and river heads on the East- ern Shore where yellow perch fishing is allowed. The trick is to figure where the perch will be moving and when.In a normal year, when water temperatures reach about 38 degrees, the yellow perch school in deep holes of Chesapeake tributaries and prepare for their spawning runs upstream.And even though this has not been a normal year, on Sunday we set out to the Shore in search of Perca flavescens with a handful of jig heads and one-inch grubs and a box of small spinners.
NEWS
November 11, 1992
For decades, the fish were literally up against the wall.Through much of this century, dams designed to harness power and develop water reserves were constructed along Maryland's rivers. The dams did their work beautifully for the human population. But they also kept salt-water (or "anadromous") species such as striped bass, shad, herring and perch from doing what comes naturally -- swimming upstream to their fresh-water spawning grounds.Many species consequently dwindled in the Patapsco, the Patuxent and other rivers, to the dismay of environmentalists and commercial and recreational fishermen.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
TUCKAHOE STATE PARK -- Larry Leasner doesn't know why some kinds of fish swim hundreds of miles upstream to spawn in the spring. But he's helping them anyway, building "fish ladders" that help them scale dams and other blockages in Maryland's rivers."
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
Lisa Farley and her two daughters braved rain and cold temperatures yesterday morning to do their part in helping a handful of migrating fish complete a 2,000-mile journey from the depths of the Atlantic to their ancestral spawning grounds in the upper reaches of the Patapsco River. Bundled in raincoats and gloves, the family measured the water temperature and helped crank the wheel to open the fish ladder at Daniels Dam on the Patapsco, allowing shad, herring and perch to swim upstream and spawn.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2001
AFTER MORE THAN 225 years away, can you go home again? That's the question I've been pleasurably researching this spring on Barren Creek, a little tributary of the Nanticoke River. Millions of Marylanders pass it, unknowing, where it crosses, no more than 20 feet wide, under U.S. 50 just east of Mardela Springs, about 40 miles from Ocean City. Every April it carries one of spring's great enthusiasms, spawning runs of 9- to 12-inch river herring, uniquely imprinted to make their way back to Barren Creek, where they were born, after winters roaming the coastal ocean.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
TUCKAHOE STATE PARK -- Larry Leasner doesn't know why some kinds of fish swim hundreds of miles upstream to spawn in the spring. But he's helping them anyway, building "fish ladders" that help them scale dams and other blockages in Maryland's rivers."
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | March 8, 1994
A few successive warm days early in March bring fishermen out to creeks and river heads on the East- ern Shore where yellow perch fishing is allowed. The trick is to figure where the perch will be moving and when.In a normal year, when water temperatures reach about 38 degrees, the yellow perch school in deep holes of Chesapeake tributaries and prepare for their spawning runs upstream.And even though this has not been a normal year, on Sunday we set out to the Shore in search of Perca flavescens with a handful of jig heads and one-inch grubs and a box of small spinners.
NEWS
June 24, 1993
Fish ladder planned at Lake WaterfordWith the completion of a new $1.98 million dam, the county Department of Parks and Recreation has refilled Lake Waterford and could begin restocking it with catfish soon. Anglers will have to wait until next spring, however, before the lake is restocked with trout, park officials said.Although the dam was completed this month, workers are still building a state-mandated fish ladder over the dam, said Jay Cuccia, assistant to the county park administrator.
NEWS
November 11, 1992
For decades, the fish were literally up against the wall.Through much of this century, dams designed to harness power and develop water reserves were constructed along Maryland's rivers. The dams did their work beautifully for the human population. But they also kept salt-water (or "anadromous") species such as striped bass, shad, herring and perch from doing what comes naturally -- swimming upstream to their fresh-water spawning grounds.Many species consequently dwindled in the Patapsco, the Patuxent and other rivers, to the dismay of environmentalists and commercial and recreational fishermen.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2001
AFTER MORE THAN 225 years away, can you go home again? That's the question I've been pleasurably researching this spring on Barren Creek, a little tributary of the Nanticoke River. Millions of Marylanders pass it, unknowing, where it crosses, no more than 20 feet wide, under U.S. 50 just east of Mardela Springs, about 40 miles from Ocean City. Every April it carries one of spring's great enthusiasms, spawning runs of 9- to 12-inch river herring, uniquely imprinted to make their way back to Barren Creek, where they were born, after winters roaming the coastal ocean.
SPORTS
October 9, 2010
Four readers have written or called to ask when the state and its partners are going to pull the plug on Simkins Dam near Ellicott City, the second of three impediments to American eels and other fish on the Patapsco River. Serena McClain of American Rivers says the big kickoff is Oct. 21 at 10:30 a.m. NOAA's No. 1 fisheries guy, Eric Schwaab, who fished the river both as a kid and when he was deputy secretary of the Department of Natural Resources, will be there to make the earth move.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | May 16, 1991
The Army is helping thousands of migratory fish reproduce.Officials at Fort George G. Meade unveiled a "fish ladder" yesterday that will allow ocean-going fish to swim upstream to their traditional spawning grounds for the first time in 50 years.For five decades, schools of blueback herring, hickory shad and alewife have been thwarted by a dam, which the U.S. Army built across the Little Patuxent River to supply the Odenton base with water.Army contractors built a specially engineered metal and concrete staircase this spring to help the fish cross the dam and continue their 2,000-mile journey from the Atlantic Ocean to the river's upper reaches.
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