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Tim Wheeler | April 29, 2014
The fish kill affecting Baltimore Harbor and the Patapsco River appears to be over, according to a spokesman for the Maryland Department of the Environment . But state biologists are still unclear why an estimated 7,000 fish turned belly up so early in the year. Biologists went back out on Tuesday to check from the mouth of the river up to Fells Point and Fort McHenry, said Jay Apperson, MDE's deputy communications director.  While biologists revised upwards their original estimate that maybe 1,000 fish had died Monday, they did not see any newly dead or dying fish, he said.
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Tim Wheeler | August 21, 2014
City officials said Thursday they are investigating a fish kill in a Northeast Baltimore creek that flows through Herring Run Park , where users of the park and streamside trail expressed dismay. "This is ridiculous," said Donald Cooper, who stopped while riding his bike to peer at the dead fish littering the stream bottom beneath the Harford Road overpass. Cooper, 52, who lives nearby, said a couple days before, he'd brought his nephew to the park to see the fish, which he said then were "swimming all over the place...Now they're all dead.
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HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
The fish kills that have plagued Baltimore's Inner Harbor and nearby creeks over the past two weeks may have eased with the dip in temperatures, but scientists caution that's not the last we've seen of potentially toxic and even deadly algae blooms in area waters. As summer heats up again, potentially dangerous microorganisms could bloom in the wake of algae blamed for suffocating fish from Dundalk to Annapolis. Officials are keeping tabs on the growth of algae around the Chesapeake Bay that have poisoned tens of thousands of fish — including one type found blooming in a Cecil County river that has in the past killed two dogs and can also be fatal to humans.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 29, 2014
The fish kill affecting Baltimore Harbor and the Patapsco River appears to be over, according to a spokesman for the Maryland Department of the Environment . But state biologists are still unclear why an estimated 7,000 fish turned belly up so early in the year. Biologists went back out on Tuesday to check from the mouth of the river up to Fells Point and Fort McHenry, said Jay Apperson, MDE's deputy communications director.  While biologists revised upwards their original estimate that maybe 1,000 fish had died Monday, they did not see any newly dead or dying fish, he said.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
When Jim Wilson retired from the federal government four years ago, he and his wife moved to Kent Island, where they initially enjoyed watching ospreys fishing in Northwest Creek from their waterfront home. But now, Wilson and most others living around the creek stay out of the murky water, which has turned yellow-green the past two summers. Even the ospreys steer clear of it, he said. Fish kills and stubborn "blooms" of blue-green algae, which at times form a floating scum, plague Northwest Creek.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 30, 1992
Scientists say they have found that "phantom" algae are responsible for mysterious mass kills that have destroyed millions of fish.The toxic algae, which have not been given a scientific name, were found in the Pamlico and Neuse estuaries in North Carolina. They appear in the water as if out of nowhere, kill hordes of fish in estuaries and fish farms by releasing poisons, and just as quickly disappear.Because the algae can survive in everything from fresh water to the salinity of the open sea, the scientists say they suspect that these resilient and powerful killers are likely to be widespread.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1999
Maryland's two-year drought continues to create inhospitable conditions for fish in the Baltimore area, and state officials said yesterday kills of baitfish and yellow perch have spread to four more tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay this week.Charles Poukish, environmental specialist for the Maryland Department of the Environment, said fish kills in the Middle River, as well as in Frog Mortar, Galloway and Dundee creeks, were first reported Tuesday.While the kills so far have been limited to large numbers of silversides, mummichogs, young menhaden and yellow perch, pickerel, catfish and sunfish also have been affected.
NEWS
September 13, 1997
YOUR SEPT. 5 editorial statement regarding Pfiesteria fish kills that ''no scientist or government can solve this problem'' ranks among the most spectacularly wrong-headed opinions ever printed by The Sun.It is clear to everyone except those who wish to bury the truth that the high nutrient content of animal feces entering the water is the highly likely suspect in the Pfiesteria piscicida outbreaks.In North Carolina it comes from the many super-size hog farms around the waterfront; in Maryland it seems related to high-nitrogen chicken manure used as a fertilizer along the narrow Pocomoke River that is slow to flush from tidal action.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
State officials said yesterday that a fish-killing microorganism has been tentatively identified in a river on the Eastern Shore, where watermen have been complaining for months that they're catching fish with sores.But Dorothy L. Leonard, fisheries director, said there isn't enough evidence to say whether the ulcers found on fish in the Pocomoke River were caused by the toxic microorganism, Pfiesteria piscicida, or by something else."We're looking at all the possible causes of these lesions," she said.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | September 18, 2007
The large number of fish kills and toxic algae blooms in the Chesapeake Bay this summer demands "immediate action," the Chesapeake Bay Foundation said yesterday in urging new funding to address the problem. Forty-five fish kills in Maryland's portion of the estuary from June to early August killed tens of thousands of menhaden, perch and other species, according to a new report by the organization titled "Bad Waters." A "significant portion" of the fish kills were linked to the toxic algae Karlodinium, the report says.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
If spring is here, dead fish can't be far behind. State officials are investigating a wide-ranging fish kill spotted Monday, stretching from Fells Point in Baltimore harbor out into the Chesapeake Bay. Authorities have yet to pinpoint a cause, though warm weather tends to bring a die-off in local waters almost every year. Dead fish were seen floating off Fells Point in the city and beyond the Patapsco's mouth at Cox's Point in Essex and near Bodkin Point in northern Anne Arundel County, according to Jay Apperson, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of the Environment.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
When Jim Wilson retired from the federal government four years ago, he and his wife moved to Kent Island, where they initially enjoyed watching ospreys fishing in Northwest Creek from their waterfront home. But now, Wilson and most others living around the creek stay out of the murky water, which has turned yellow-green the past two summers. Even the ospreys steer clear of it, he said. Fish kills and stubborn "blooms" of blue-green algae, which at times form a floating scum, plague Northwest Creek.
NEWS
February 21, 2013
As a concerned mother and environmentalist, I want to thank The Sun for its recent article on pollution in the Chesapeake Bay ("Report finds widespread contaminants in the bay," Jan. 22). Meaningful efforts to significantly improve the bay must address pesticide runoff. The Pesticide Use Reporting Bill would require certified pesticide and fertilizer applicators to report usage data to a centralized database. Centralizing such information would benefit public agencies in their response to fish kills, dead zones and human health outbreaks.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
The fish kills that have plagued Baltimore's Inner Harbor and nearby creeks over the past two weeks may have eased with the dip in temperatures, but scientists caution that's not the last we've seen of potentially toxic and even deadly algae blooms in area waters. As summer heats up again, potentially dangerous microorganisms could bloom in the wake of algae blamed for suffocating fish from Dundalk to Annapolis. Officials are keeping tabs on the growth of algae around the Chesapeake Bay that have poisoned tens of thousands of fish — including one type found blooming in a Cecil County river that has in the past killed two dogs and can also be fatal to humans.
NEWS
June 7, 2012
The Sun got it right in its recent editorial entitled "Dollars and scents," (June 1) discussing the economic impact of the declining health of our harbor and our bay. As algal blooms and resulting fish kills happen year after year, citizens and regulators start to think that it's a normal phenomenon, caused only by high temperatures and extreme weather events. But we cannot pretend that this is normal, particularly when the science presents an urgent situation. Once the recent algal bloom began, the water samples taken in the harbor showed an increase in levels of chlorophyll and nutrients.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
On the wave of unwanted publicity over unruly youths downtown, owners of businesses around the Inner Harbor were probably none too thrilled to have the smell of dead fish wafting through the air last weekend. Naturally, they brushed it off as having no impact on tourism - but you can bet that the odor was about as welcome as another Pat McDonough press conference. The likely culprit was mahogany tide, an algae that feeds on excess nutrients. This creates huge blooms that eventually die, rot and suck the oxygen out of the water, leaving other forms of aquatic life to suffocate.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
Scientists have discovered in Maryland and Delaware waters the same microorganism responsible for red tides and fish kills in Japan and Norway. It is the first time the organism, Chattonella verruculosa, has appeared in U.S. coastal waters. The organism was found in samples from coastal bays in both states, but the concentrations in Maryland were lower than those in Delaware and were not at toxic levels, according to Rob Magnien, director of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources' tidewater ecosystems division.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | December 3, 1991
Sneaky little algae that pop up from the mud of a bay, attack fish with a deadly toxin, then quickly retreat may explain some mysterious fish kills in the Chesapeake and other East Coast waters.North Carolina researchers recently discovered the new species -- nearly by mistake -- then found it at the scene of a crime: a major fish kill in May in Pamlico Sound along the coast of North Carolina. While scientists have not yet looked for the algae species in Chesapeake Bay waters, it has sparked their curiosity because it could explain numerous fish kills, particularly of menhaden, in the Chesapeake and tidal portions of its tributaries.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
Dead fish continued to surface Tuesday in Baltimore-area waters, though the conditions that scientists believe have been causing the weeklong die-off may be moderating slightly. State investigators estimated there were 10,000 fish floating in Stoney Creek in northern Anne Arundel County and in its tributaries, Back Cove, Beehive Cove and Nabbs Creek, according to Samantha Kappalman, spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of the Environment. She emailed that "several thousand," mostly menhaden, were bunched up by the Fort Smallwood Road bridge.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
A powerful stench was in the air Saturday at the Inner Harbor as 12-year-olds Alison Chase and Marissa Westerbeke hunched over the water's edge, studying tiny crabs floating to the surface. The girls were in town from Connecticut for a relaxing annual vacation with Alison's family, but the pervasive smell of dead fish and rotting plant matter — caused by a massive algae bloom — had them totally grossed out. "It's, like, sad and disgusting," said Marissa. "It's gross.
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