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By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | June 21, 2006
What should I look for when buying fish fillets? It's always trickier to assess the quality of a fish fillet or steak than it is of a whole fish. A fresh whole fish should smell just barely of the sea and should be firm and resilient to the touch. The skin should be shiny and taut. Any time you see a whole fish that you like, you are within your rights to buy it and have the fish monger fillet it for you on the spot. If you are faced with fillets or steaks, look for moist, firm, full flesh that is not pulling apart or flaking where the muscles come together.
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EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | April 18, 2012
Many of us grew up in the Friday night is Fish Night tradition. At our house on the North Shore of Boston, Fish Night could include cod fish cakes, creamed salmon on toast (aka Salmon Wiggle) or, most often, simply fried fish fillets. Not batter involved. Just a dunk in some sunny yellow cornmeal and a saute (in lard and later, vegetable shortening) in the skillet. Mashed potatoes and canned vegetables usually went with. The Friday Fish Night tradition continues, although there really is no longer a reason for it. And cornmeal-fried (in vegetable oil)
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NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | November 1, 2006
Cooking en papillote means baking something -- fish fillets often -- on a bed of aromatic vegetables in a pouch of parchment or foil. The contents of the pouch steam in their juices, their flavors mixing. We love the romance of en papillote: First, you cut a giant heart from the parchment or foil. Then, when you serve, each diner opens his own personal pouch to get a fragrant poof of steam. Very cool. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | October 1, 2008
It's a challenge to make a fish dish for four and stay under a $12 total - unless you use tilapia. I thought this recipe from the new book Two Dudes, One Pan, originally designed for grouper, might work with any white fish, even thin fillets of tilapia. The browned butter and salty capers liven up this pedestrian fish, which cooks quickly. If you can find it on sale, baby bok choy makes a nice accompaniment. Spray with an olive-oil cooking spray and grill for a few minutes on a grill pan. shopping list Tilapia: $7.98 Butter: 32 cents Capers: 80 cents Lemons: $1 Parsley: 5 cents Baby bok choy: $1.50 From the pantry: salt, cooking spray TOTAL: $11.65* Note: Prices are calculated based on the amount of each ingredient used in the recipe.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | February 21, 2007
Like the armchair traveler who is content to read about daring adventures, prepared Asian stir-fry sauces hold out the promise of new and exotic tastes - without the dangers of deciphering ingredient labels in a foreign language. But sadly, when it comes to flavor, something is usually lost in the translation. Unlike classical French sauces and reductions, Asian sauces are relatively simple to pull together. Whisk together a few uncomplicated ingredients and skip the MSG (monosodium glutamate, an allergy trigger for some people)
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,Special to the Sun | February 3, 2002
I like martinis. This is not to suggest that a martini qualifies for "Dinner Tonight" (although I'd be happy to make a case for it) but rather that there's always a lot more vermouth hanging around the house than I need. So why not put it to use in an entree? Poaching -- cooking food by immersing it in just-simmering water -- is as easy and as fast as it gets. It's also a great way to prepare tender fish fillets. Flavoring the poaching liquid (aka water) adds oomph to whatever's being cooked; broth or wine are typical additions.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce | April 16, 2008
This dish came about out of necessity. We first had it at my sister's house when she and my nephews decided to cancel restaurant plans at the last minute and let Aunt Donna prepare dinner based on groceries at hand, which included a bag of quick-frozen tilapia fillets. We loved the quick-fix results, based on the tube of grits my sister described as an impulse purchase from Trader Joe's "to see how it works." Grits and polenta lovers understand how perfection can be achieved by balancing the smooth, chewy texture of this nearly bland starch with the savory bite of seafood.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | February 10, 1991
People from all over the world enjoy vacationing in Florida, and one reason is the great seafood they can get here. Florida is bordered on one side by the Atlantic Ocean and on the other by the Gulf of Mexico, offering a wealth of marine life.Also, during the winter, when farmers in cooler parts of the globe are just planting crops, farmers in subtropical Florida are already harvesting fresh tomatoes, crisp celery and sweet carrots. These products from the sea and land combine in a silky-textured and virtually fat-free soup called Florida red chowder.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 1997
Low-fat, fast and multipurpose, this sauce can be used on almost any variety of grilled, broiled, baked or sauted fish or even on chicken. Make the most of the farmers' market by serving an abundance of produce such as broccoli and corn on the cob with the fish.For the finale of this low-fat meal, offer a refreshing peach Melba with fresh ginger: Top a scoop of low-fat vanilla ice cream or frozen yogurt with sliced fresh peaches.Combine some fresh raspberries with a drizzle of orange juice and a pinch of grated ginger.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Orlando Sentinel | January 22, 1992
For generations, Mediterranean cooks have combined tomatoes, herbs, garlic and olive oil with fresh seafood. This time-honored ingredient mix has been updated in the following recipe for Mediterranean fish.The result is an easy-to-make, robust fish dinner that is low in fat, high in protein. The recipe can be made with almost any kind of fish.The microwave oven cooks fish quickly so the delicate flesh stays tender and doesn't dry out. The zesty topping of herbs and vegetables moistens the fish as it cooks and provides a bit of Italian-flavored juice that soaks nicely into rice, orzo or couscous.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce | April 16, 2008
This dish came about out of necessity. We first had it at my sister's house when she and my nephews decided to cancel restaurant plans at the last minute and let Aunt Donna prepare dinner based on groceries at hand, which included a bag of quick-frozen tilapia fillets. We loved the quick-fix results, based on the tube of grits my sister described as an impulse purchase from Trader Joe's "to see how it works." Grits and polenta lovers understand how perfection can be achieved by balancing the smooth, chewy texture of this nearly bland starch with the savory bite of seafood.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | February 21, 2007
Like the armchair traveler who is content to read about daring adventures, prepared Asian stir-fry sauces hold out the promise of new and exotic tastes - without the dangers of deciphering ingredient labels in a foreign language. But sadly, when it comes to flavor, something is usually lost in the translation. Unlike classical French sauces and reductions, Asian sauces are relatively simple to pull together. Whisk together a few uncomplicated ingredients and skip the MSG (monosodium glutamate, an allergy trigger for some people)
NEWS
By Donna Deane and Donna Deane,Los Angeles Times | November 5, 2006
It's a brown butter kind of fall. That is to say, the nutty flavor and butterscotch aroma of butter that is cooked until it turns hazelnut brown are turning up on more than a few dinner plates. Making brown butter is simple: Melt unsalted butter in a small saute pan over medium heat, cooking it until the water cooks off, then turn down the heat and continue cooking, whisking constantly, until the solids turn golden brown. The whisking ensures even browning. If you have a light-colored pan, that's the one to use, as it makes it easy to see the browning.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | November 1, 2006
Cooking en papillote means baking something -- fish fillets often -- on a bed of aromatic vegetables in a pouch of parchment or foil. The contents of the pouch steam in their juices, their flavors mixing. We love the romance of en papillote: First, you cut a giant heart from the parchment or foil. Then, when you serve, each diner opens his own personal pouch to get a fragrant poof of steam. Very cool. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | June 21, 2006
What should I look for when buying fish fillets? It's always trickier to assess the quality of a fish fillet or steak than it is of a whole fish. A fresh whole fish should smell just barely of the sea and should be firm and resilient to the touch. The skin should be shiny and taut. Any time you see a whole fish that you like, you are within your rights to buy it and have the fish monger fillet it for you on the spot. If you are faced with fillets or steaks, look for moist, firm, full flesh that is not pulling apart or flaking where the muscles come together.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 28, 2006
Many of my friends are talented on more than one level. Take, for example, my pal Elinor Lipman, a successful novelist as well as a gifted cook and hostess. She infuses her cooking with the same creativity and crispness that she pours into her witty fiction. Whenever I've eaten at her house, I've not only loved the food, but marveled at how she invents or adapts her recipes. Lately, she and I have engaged in recipe swaps, e-mailing one another new dishes with personal comments and notes attached.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | May 4, 1994
Fish is one of those items that often intimidates cooks pressed for time.Tilapia fillets are recommended here because they are usually less expensive than orange roughy or flounder and are becoming more common in the grocery store. A very mild farm-raised fish, tilapia pairs easily with a great variety of toppings. Farm-raised // catfish also have a mild flavor that works well with this recipe. If you aren't a fan of cilantro, substitute freshly chopped parsley in the sauce. Start the artichokes first, since they require the longest cooking time.
NEWS
By Donna Deane and Donna Deane,Los Angeles Times | November 5, 2006
It's a brown butter kind of fall. That is to say, the nutty flavor and butterscotch aroma of butter that is cooked until it turns hazelnut brown are turning up on more than a few dinner plates. Making brown butter is simple: Melt unsalted butter in a small saute pan over medium heat, cooking it until the water cooks off, then turn down the heat and continue cooking, whisking constantly, until the solids turn golden brown. The whisking ensures even browning. If you have a light-colored pan, that's the one to use, as it makes it easy to see the browning.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,Special to the Sun | February 3, 2002
I like martinis. This is not to suggest that a martini qualifies for "Dinner Tonight" (although I'd be happy to make a case for it) but rather that there's always a lot more vermouth hanging around the house than I need. So why not put it to use in an entree? Poaching -- cooking food by immersing it in just-simmering water -- is as easy and as fast as it gets. It's also a great way to prepare tender fish fillets. Flavoring the poaching liquid (aka water) adds oomph to whatever's being cooked; broth or wine are typical additions.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 10, 2000
SOMETIMES A good sauce can save supper. Or so I am told. Even though this never happens to me, let's pretend something was cooked much too long. Let's say the something was a fillet of fish and that instead of closely monitoring its progress as it sat on the barbecue grill, you instead played catch with your kid in the alley. Continuing this make-believe scenario, let's say that when you returned to the grill you began grilling a mango instead of removing the fish from the fire. That's right, a mango.
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