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NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,elizabeth. large@baltsun.com | August 27, 2008
Top 10 Tuesday is a list compiled with the help of readers, past and present reviewers, and other foodies at the paper. It's meant to be a starting point for discussion only, not a definitive list, and the discussions on my blog diningatlarge often get quite ... um ... lively. Last week Dave in Perry Hall wanted to know where he could get great fish and chips. Here's the list we came up with (note that the order is alphabetical): 1 Galway Bay: 63 Maryland Ave., Annapolis 2 Koco's Pub: 4301 Harford Road, Lauraville 3 Life of Reilly: 2031 E. Fairmount Ave., Butchers Hill/Patterson Park 4 Mama's on the Half Shell: 2901 O'Donnell St., Canton 5 McCabe's: 3845 Falls Road, Hampden 6 Mick O'Shea's: 328 N. Charles St., Mount Vernon 7 Nick's Fish House: 2600 Insulator Drive, South Baltimore 8 Red Brick Station: 8149 Honeygo Blvd.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2012
Ordering fish and chips at a place named Basta Pasta might seem like a stretch. But in fairness, the Lutherville restaurant's full name is Basta Pasta Italian & Seafood Restaurant, and it ably handles both fish and pasta. Judging from a recent order of fish and chips, it's clear the fry cook knows his business - the coating on the fresh filet was crisp, without a hint of oil visible. The fish is actually local rockfish, which elevates the classic English street fare to sit-down restaurant status.
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FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 14, 1996
LEEDS, England -- Anything you ever wanted to know about fish and chips you can learn from Arnold Scholes, who has skinned, battered and fried Britain's most famous fast food for 50 years.The man knows his cod and can talk for hours about potatoes. But please, don't get Scholes started on quality of cooking oil, for if there's anything he loathes more than a McDonald's, it's a bag of limp and soggy fish and chips served up by a disinterested fryer."The fryer is letting himself and his trade down by turning out an inferior product," he says.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
The words "beer food" bring to mind items like pretzels, peanuts and pizza. But at Red Brick Station in White Marsh the term means mussels steamed in ale, fish dipped in a beery batter and meat marinated in stout. Here, the beer is often in the food. It works, in part because the beer is fresh. There is a brewery on the premises, between the bar and the dining room. It also works because the kitchen has a nice touch with spices. The concept here is to serve English-style ales and English pub fare.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Matthew F. Lallo, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2012
Ordering fish and chips at a place named Basta Pasta might seem like a stretch. But in fairness, the Lutherville restaurant's full name is Basta Pasta Italian & Seafood Restaurant, and it ably handles both fish and pasta. Judging from a recent order of fish and chips, it's clear the fry cook knows his business - the coating on the fresh filet was crisp, without a hint of oil visible. The fish is actually local rockfish, which elevates the classic English street fare to sit-down restaurant status.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
A smallish Lutherville strip mall is the setting for Sabor , a casual fine-dining restaurant with a Puerto Rican influence brought by chef-owner Rudolfo Domacasse who's worked in several notable Baltimore-area kitchens. We loved dinners there but had never tried the lunch menu. We were pressed for time but were in the neighborhood and decided to risk a slow-food experience. 11:59 a.m. We arrive and within five minutes we had drinks and a pretty good idea what we'd order.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
The words "beer food" bring to mind items like pretzels, peanuts and pizza. But at Red Brick Station in White Marsh the term means mussels steamed in ale, fish dipped in a beery batter and meat marinated in stout. Here, the beer is often in the food. It works, in part because the beer is fresh. There is a brewery on the premises, between the bar and the dining room. It also works because the kitchen has a nice touch with spices. The concept here is to serve English-style ales and English pub fare.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | December 10, 1996
In 18 years of running fishing charters, Capt. Monty Hawkins had never been so disgusted.One day last month, as he fished 15 miles off Ocean City, the skipper of the O. C. Princess saw three spiny dogfish writhing helplessly on the surface of the Atlantic. One of the 60 customers aboard his boat had sliced off their fins and tossed the small sharks, still alive, back in the water."It was the most despicable thing I've ever seen on the ocean. I went ballistic," Hawkins recalled recently. "Wanton waste is against the law for any sort of hunting."
NEWS
April 18, 2007
The Life of Reilly 2031 E. Fairmount Ave., Baltimore -- 410-327-6425 Hours --11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-2 a.m. Fridays-Saturdays Restaurant's estimate --15 minutes Ready in --14 minutes Ryan's Daughter 600 E. Belvedere Ave., Baltimore -- 410-464-1000 Hours --11 a.m.-2 a.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --15-20 minutes Ready in --17 minutes This order, $16.75, fell apart in our hands. The pieces of fish were only lightly breaded and the coating came off in chunks as we picked it up out of the container.
FEATURES
By Gary A. Warner and Gary A. Warner,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | June 1, 1997
London is hot, hot, hot these days -- full of exciting new eateries, pulsating bars and great cafes. But you didn't travel to the British capital to eat French food, drink Australian lager or sip espresso in a New York-style coffeehouse. Here, instead, are a ++ few spots that conjure visions of Merry Olde England.Rules is London's oldest restaurant, having opened in 1798. A short walk from Covent Garden, it's the place to go -- especially in the fall for game dishes including partridge, rabbit, deer and pheasant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2010
A smallish Lutherville strip mall is the setting for Sabor , a casual fine-dining restaurant with a Puerto Rican influence brought by chef-owner Rudolfo Domacasse who's worked in several notable Baltimore-area kitchens. We loved dinners there but had never tried the lunch menu. We were pressed for time but were in the neighborhood and decided to risk a slow-food experience. 11:59 a.m. We arrive and within five minutes we had drinks and a pretty good idea what we'd order.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
Hank's Tavern & Eats is the fun beer-drinking cousin in the Chef Geoff family of restaurants, a group of white-tablecloth establishments in D.C. and northern Virginia. It opened in 2008 in University Town Center, one of those walkable developments that combine residences, movie theaters, retail shops and restaurants without feeling like a movie-set Main Street. A large bar dominates the cavernous space, and plenty of televisions along the walls are tuned in to sporting events, but Hank's isn't one of those sports bars serving nothing but gloppy dips and deep-fried everything.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
Yes, Your Majesty, British food has come to Little Patuxent Parkway. The Brits, represented by Union Jack's, have taken over space once occupied by Italians, the departed restaurant That's Amore, and are serving up bangers, cottage pies and pints next to The Mall in Columbia. This operation, which opened about six weeks ago, is a sprawling gastro-pub. The bar alone has room for 40, the patio, which on pleasant days offers a sunny view of the Little Patuxent Parkway, seats 120. The whole restaurant accommodates close to 400, I was told.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Often when a restaurant reinvents itself, it smacks of desperation. But, it turns out, not in the case of Corks in Federal Hill. Before it closed at the end of the summer for renovations, Corks was one of those fine-dining restaurants that have a good reputation but people forget about because newer, trendier places get all the buzz. When it reopened after two months, it had a nifty redo by Patrick Sutton Associates and a more casual, less expensive, cheese-centric menu. When I last ate there six years ago, the back dining room was a private room.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,elizabeth. large@baltsun.com | August 27, 2008
Top 10 Tuesday is a list compiled with the help of readers, past and present reviewers, and other foodies at the paper. It's meant to be a starting point for discussion only, not a definitive list, and the discussions on my blog diningatlarge often get quite ... um ... lively. Last week Dave in Perry Hall wanted to know where he could get great fish and chips. Here's the list we came up with (note that the order is alphabetical): 1 Galway Bay: 63 Maryland Ave., Annapolis 2 Koco's Pub: 4301 Harford Road, Lauraville 3 Life of Reilly: 2031 E. Fairmount Ave., Butchers Hill/Patterson Park 4 Mama's on the Half Shell: 2901 O'Donnell St., Canton 5 McCabe's: 3845 Falls Road, Hampden 6 Mick O'Shea's: 328 N. Charles St., Mount Vernon 7 Nick's Fish House: 2600 Insulator Drive, South Baltimore 8 Red Brick Station: 8149 Honeygo Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | December 13, 2007
Two well-regarded Irish restaurants - Galway Bay in Annapolis and Killarney House in Davidsonville - have recently acquired a sibling in the form of Brian Boru, which opened in September in Severna Park. Like the other two local members of the Irish Restaurant Co. (there's an inn in Massachusetts as well), Brian Boru serves an Irish menu heavy on potatoes, corned beef, lamb and seafood. -- Poor:]
TRAVEL
By LORI SEARS | February 12, 2006
Scottish and Irish Music Festival Lads and lasses can catch three days of live entertainment at the Scottish and Irish Music Festival and Fair at the Valley Forge Convention Center in King of Prussia, Pa., on Friday, Saturday and Feb. 19. The 14th annual festival opens with a Celtic concert with Maura O'Connell, Rathkeltair and Ashley MacLeod at 7:30 p.m. Friday. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., and there will be vendor booths set up at the show. The festival continues Saturday and Feb. 19 with live music from Brother, Searson, Seamus Kennedy, the Brigadoons, Andy Cooney, the Jimmy Kelly Band, DidgeriDrew, Seven Nations and many others.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
Yes, Your Majesty, British food has come to Little Patuxent Parkway. The Brits, represented by Union Jack's, have taken over space once occupied by Italians, the departed restaurant That's Amore, and are serving up bangers, cottage pies and pints next to The Mall in Columbia. This operation, which opened about six weeks ago, is a sprawling gastro-pub. The bar alone has room for 40, the patio, which on pleasant days offers a sunny view of the Little Patuxent Parkway, seats 120. The whole restaurant accommodates close to 400, I was told.
NEWS
April 18, 2007
The Life of Reilly 2031 E. Fairmount Ave., Baltimore -- 410-327-6425 Hours --11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-2 a.m. Fridays-Saturdays Restaurant's estimate --15 minutes Ready in --14 minutes Ryan's Daughter 600 E. Belvedere Ave., Baltimore -- 410-464-1000 Hours --11 a.m.-2 a.m. daily Restaurant's estimate --15-20 minutes Ready in --17 minutes This order, $16.75, fell apart in our hands. The pieces of fish were only lightly breaded and the coating came off in chunks as we picked it up out of the container.
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