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By New York Times News Service | June 20, 1994
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. -- For months, a special prosecutor has worked with little public display on a variety of questions involving the Whitewater case. But today, one aspect of that investigation will assume a more visible role as the prosecutor, Robert B. Fiske Jr., and his team of lawyers conduct their first trial.The case involves two men accused of conspiring to defraud the Small Business Administration.Whether this otherwise garden-variety trial involving defendants peripheral to the overall Whitewater investigation will disclose any new details of the operations of the Whitewater Development Co. depends on the possible testimony of David Hale, a former municipal judge cooperating as part of a plea agreement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Executive producer Barry Levinson urges viewers to think of his HBO film "Phil Spector" as a two-person play - not a docudrama about the first murder trial of the rock producer. "It really is a two-person piece," Levinson said in a telephone interview last week. "And if you're looking for some kind of docudrama, which we are more familiar with on television, this isn't it. " The two persons, Academy Award-winners Al Pacino as Spector and Helen Mirren as his defense attorney, Linda Kenney Baden, can fill a screen like few others.
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SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,Evening Sun Staff | August 2, 1991
Kids from the Rebounders and Gym Plus clubs were going through their gymnastics exercises to the delight of the noontime crowd at Harborplace. Later, Henry Rosenberg was talking about "raising awareness" for the sport and, undoubtedly, the display had done wonders.Then came the speaking portion of the news conference to officially launch the countdown to the U.S. Olympic Gymnastics Trials here next June. The crowd began to disperse.Take note. If the Trials to pick Uncle Sam's 16-person gymnastics squad for next year's Summer Olympics in Barcelona, Spain, are to be a rip-roaring success at the Baltimore Arena, just run the kids out for noontime shows a dozen times or so.Rosenberg, chairman of the local organizing committee, said the event's budget will come to about $250,000 and, already, Crown Central Petroleum and USAir are in as major sponsors.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2012
It took jurors only about an hour Wednesday to find brothers Travers and Tremayne Johnson not guilty of setting a pit bull on fire — a fraction of the 20 hours jurors spent in the twins' first trial, unable to agree on a verdict. Family members were overjoyed. But the not guilty verdicts on the four charges against each brother were bittersweet for the Johnsons and their relatives, who have maintained throughout the trials that the twins are innocent. "That they defamed someone's character at such a young age is very troubling," said Camille Mills, a cousin of the defendants who joined their mother and siblings in court.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1997
Prosecutors trying to get Scotland E. Williams convicted in a second trial in the 1994 slayings of two Washington lawyers will be allowed to use again one of their most important pieces of evidence.Anne Arundel County Circuit Judge Pamela L. North ruled yesterday that photocopies of shoe prints taken from Williams in prior unrelated arrest may be used in the slayings trial."It is a very important piece of evidence to us," said Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee, adding that he was "very gratified" by the ruling.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 23, 2004
FAIRFAX, Va. -- Convicted sniper John Allen Muhammad -- who briefly acted as his attorney in his first trial and told jurors he was at the fatal shooting of the man he was accused of killing -- has considered a reprise of the lawyer role for his second capital murder trial. His attorneys informed a judge presiding over the case of that possibility during a bench conference in July, according to a transcript of the discussion that was unsealed yesterday. "I take it what you're telling me is that I need to have my Feretta warning close," Fairfax County Circuit Judge Jonathan C. Thacher said in the bench conference, referring to the warning a judge must give a defendant who wants to act as his own attorney.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2000
The prosecutor in Alpna Patel's manslaughter trial abruptly ended the state's case yesterday without calling two critical witnesses from the first trial, surprising defense attorneys who scrambled to retool their strategy. After two days of testimony,Assistant State's Attorney William D. McCollum concluded his case against the Canadian dentist accused of stabbing her physician husband, Viresh Patel. The unexpected announcement - which came 12 hours after he told the court Wednesday he would call three witnesses yesterday - caused Patel's attorney, Edward Smith Jr., to ask the judge to throw out the manslaughter charge for lack of evidence.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2011
Defiant to the end, Kenneth D. Perry was found guilty Tuesday of killing two women 12 years ago in the presence of two children, one of them his son. The 45-year-old defendant, who seemed unrepentant and contentious during much of the weeklong trial in Baltimore Circuit Court, snickered as the jury was sent home and then blamed his lawyer, Janice Bledsoe, for his conviction. "You got me good, counselor," Perry said. "You really got me good, Ms. Bledsoe. " The attorney, who had only barely masked her exasperation with her client's behavior while trying to represent him, moved away and sat at the prosecution table as Perry continued muttering.
NEWS
By JULIE BYKOWICZ and JULIE BYKOWICZ,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
A forensic scientist testified yesterday at the triple-murder trial of two Mexican immigrants that a newly discovered "blue granular substance" from the crime scene could not be identified - meaning what could have been new evidence is more likely a nonstarter. Policarpio Espinoza, 24, and Adan Canela, 19, are on trial for a second time in Baltimore Circuit Court on charges that they murdered three young relatives in May 2004. Their first trial ended last summer in a hung jury. Prosecutors asked the Baltimore Police Department crime lab to re-examine several pieces of evidence in October, after the mistrial, and a lab worker testified Wednesday that she spotted a blue substance on several articles of clothing from the crime scene in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
The second animal-cruelty trial of brothers Travers and Tremayne Johnson, whose first Baltimore proceeding ended in mistrial, was postponed Monday shortly before jury selection was set to begin, because witnesses were unavailable. It's the fourth time the retrial has been delayed since May. The new trial date is set for Feb. 1 — nearly a year after the first trial ended. "A key witness in the state's case has had a family emergency and is not going to be able to testify for approximately two weeks, possibly longer," prosecutor Jennifer Rallo told the judge, according to a video recording of the morning proceeding reviewed by The Baltimore Sun. The teen-aged twins, who are in custody on unrelated charges, are accused of setting fire to a pit bull, who didn't survive despite the efforts of rescue workers, who nicknamed the dog Phoenix.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | April 3, 2012
From Luke Broadwater: A key witness in the case against Travers and Tremayne Johnson, who are accused of burning a pit bull puppy named Phoenix, abruptly refused to testify Tuesday, causing a judge to sentence her to six months in jail. Tiera Goodman, 25, of the 800 block of Braddish Ave., witnessed Phoenix as she was fatally burned in 2009, and testified during the first trial, which ended in a hung jury, that she saw the 20-year-old Johnson twins running from the scene. But Goodman, who is incarcerated on unrelated charges and initially identified the Johnsons to receive a $1,000 reward, charged her attitude from helpful to obstinate Tuesday.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2011
The second animal-cruelty trial of brothers Travers and Tremayne Johnson, whose first Baltimore proceeding ended in mistrial, was postponed Monday shortly before jury selection was set to begin, because witnesses were unavailable. It's the fourth time the retrial has been delayed since May. The new trial date is set for Feb. 1 — nearly a year after the first trial ended. "A key witness in the state's case has had a family emergency and is not going to be able to testify for approximately two weeks, possibly longer," prosecutor Jennifer Rallo told the judge, according to a video recording of the morning proceeding reviewed by The Baltimore Sun. The teen-aged twins, who are in custody on unrelated charges, are accused of setting fire to a pit bull, who didn't survive despite the efforts of rescue workers, who nicknamed the dog Phoenix.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
Jury selection is set to begin Monday in the second animal-cruelty trial of Travers and Tremayne Johnson, twin brothers accused of setting fire to a pit bull in 2009. Their first trial was held in February and ended in a hung jury after three days of deliberation, with 11 members voting to convict and a single holdout saying she was unsure of the brothers' guilt. They're accused of dousing a young female pit bull in accelerant in May 2009, setting her alight and leaving her for dead on a West Baltimore street.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2011
The man accused of fatally shooting a Towson gas station owner in a murder-for-hire scheme is due in court this week - the first trial under Maryland's revamped death penalty law, legal experts say. And the trial of Walter P. Bishop Jr., scheduled to begin Tuesday with jury selection in Harford County Circuit Court, could eventually test Maryland's definition of a capital case, as his lawyers argue that police improperly obtained a crucial piece...
NEWS
May 4, 2011
The thrust of Gregg Bernstein's campaign against longtime incumbent Baltimore State's Attorney Patricia Jessamy was that her office was badly managed and too often produced incompetent performances in the courtroom. In that context, his pledge to personally try cases if he was elected — in part to share the prosecutorial load but also to show the lawyers on staff how it's done — served as an important symbol of confidence and hands-on leadership. A successful private defense attorney and former federal prosecutor, he promised to get convictions in cases that his predecessor wouldn't touch.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2011
Defiant to the end, Kenneth D. Perry was found guilty Tuesday of killing two women 12 years ago in the presence of two children, one of them his son. The 45-year-old defendant, who seemed unrepentant and contentious during much of the weeklong trial in Baltimore Circuit Court, snickered as the jury was sent home and then blamed his lawyer, Janice Bledsoe, for his conviction. "You got me good, counselor," Perry said. "You really got me good, Ms. Bledsoe. " The attorney, who had only barely masked her exasperation with her client's behavior while trying to represent him, moved away and sat at the prosecution table as Perry continued muttering.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 18, 2005
NEW YORK - L. Dennis Kozlowski, the former chairman and chief executive officer of Tyco International, and his top lieutenant were convicted yesterday on fraud, conspiracy and grand larceny charges, bringing an end to a three-year case that came to symbolize an era of corporate greed and scandal. Kozlowski and Mark H. Swartz, Tyco's former chief financial officer, were convicted by a New York State Supreme Court jury in lower Manhattan on all but one of 31 counts of grand larceny, conspiracy, falsifying business records and securities fraud.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,Los Angeles Times | October 14, 2007
GUANTANAMO BAY, Cuba -- A complex of canvas Quonset huts arrayed like dominoes has risen on an abandoned airfield here, where just a year ago the Pentagon envisioned a $125 million permanent judicial center in which terrorism suspects would be brought to trial. The battlefield-style Expeditionary Legal Complex, which can be quickly dismantled once the war-crimes tribunals of the Guantanamo detainees are over, reflects the shrinking mission of the controversial procedures created by the Military Commissions Act of 2006.
NEWS
October 2, 2009
At the behest of Mayor Sheila Dixon's legal defense team, the theft and perjury charges against the mayor will be separated into two trials. Her lawyers aren't talking about the strategy behind the shift, but other attorneys tell The Sun's Annie Linskey that trying the charges separately might make Ms. Dixon look less culpable - it lessens the possibility of a cumulative effect on jurors in which a profusion of charges might make her seem guilty -...
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun Reporter | June 19, 2008
GREENBELT - The courtroom was filled with familiar faces. The judge, the two prosecutors, the defense attorney and the defendant - all had faced each other before. The only thing different was the jury. As the retrial of former Prince George's County schools chief Andre J. Hornsby got under way yesterday, Assistant U.S. Attorney Michael Pauze made the same broad-stroke accusations that he had at Hornsby's previous trial, which ended in November with a deadlocked jury. But Pauze, in an encore he had not envisaged, appeared determined yesterday to establish a firmer, more credible case, to drive his points home with greater clarity, lest a similar fate befall Hornsby's new trial.
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