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First Thanksgiving

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NEWS
By Lisa Anderson and Lisa Anderson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2006
NEW YORK -- One autumn day in 1621, newly arrived Pilgrims joined native Wampanoag Indians in Massachusetts' Plymouth Colony to share a harvest meal of thanksgiving, including roast turkey, pumpkin pie and an Indian-supplied delicacy, popcorn. From kindergartners acting in their first pageant to grandparents presiding over the family feast, most Americans know the story of Thanksgiving cold. And most of them would be wrong. It's time to talk turkey about Thanksgiving. While long immortalized in painting, poetry and song - and annually reinforced by chocolate turkeys, buckle-hatted Garfields on Hallmark cards and school re-enactments of the blessed banquet - the "first Thanksgiving" that gave rise to America's holiday tradition never occurred, at least not in the way most of us picture and understand it. There is no historical link between the harvest meal in 1621 and America's Thanksgiving narrative.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Emma Schkloven and The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
It's a great time of year, but it can also be one of the most stressful - especially if you're organizing (and cooking!) Thanksgiving dinner on your own for the first time. Your parents keep calling with suggestions to the menu, your cousin really wants you to deep-fry that turkey - and how on earth do you incorporate veganism into such a meat-centric holiday? There's just so much to do, and not enough time in the day to fit it all in. Don't panic. A professional is stepping up to provide some advice.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1996
CHAMPLAIN, Va. -- Americans steeped in all the folklore surrounding the "First Thanksgiving" at Plymouth, Mass., in 1621 may have trouble remembering anything about an older English settlement in Virginia.But the fact is, adventurers and planters near Jamestown had been building their colony for 13 years before the Mayflower reached America.Since 1607, they had been struggling for a safe and prosperous living amid the thriving, and often hostile, Indian community in whose country they had settled.
NEWS
November 27, 2008
It's that time of year when we give thanks for the former colleague who had the bright idea to forgo the heartfelt, mostly predictable appreciation of family and fortunes on this uniquely American holiday and instead reflect on the writing of the Thanksgiving editorial, no easy task. To our colleague's great chagrin, an earlier editorialist - also struggling, no doubt - had the very same idea on how best to serve up the holiday editorial. This year, we continue the tradition, reprinting a version of that piece with a few tweaks and lots of nods to Baltimore Sun editorial writers past and present.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Joe Mathews and Norris P. West and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1995
From Hungary, British Guyana, France and Venezuela, they came as immigrants to this country in search of refuge, education, romance, economic security and their children's future.Whatever they left in their native countries, they found something here that made them want to call it home.Today is their first Thanksgiving as American citizens.Ilona Lantos, Jung-Shik Son, Yonette Thompson, Pascale Fleischer and Hector Guaita Manzano were among the 3,201 Marylanders who were naturalized during a ceremony at the USAir Arena on Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN STAFF | March 25, 2001
"Popped Culture: A Social History of Popcorn in America," by Andrew F. Smith (Smithsonian Institution Press, 264 pages, $16.95) Popcorn is, well, light stuff. But few entertainment food forms are as deep in America's character as it is. This volume is a comprehensive, scholarly but utterly enchanting exploration of the explosive fluffy kernels from their earleist beginnings (back in Western Hemisphere prehistory) to the present. Popcorn became a major American thing in the early 1800s - and no, there is not a shred of evidece that it was present at the first Thanksgiving.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dorothy Fleetwood | November 2, 1995
Two years before the Pilgrims arrived in Plymouth, Mass., a band of Englishmen sailed up the James River and landed somewhere near what is now Berkeley Plantation at Charles City County, Va. On Dec. 4, 1619, the men took part in a celebration of Thanksgiving. This first Thanksgiving Day is commemorated each year at the Berkeley site on the first weekend in November.Gates will open at 9 a.m. Sunday for this year's Virginia Thanksgiving Festival. It will be a full day of activities for all ages with Native American dancing, cultural demonstrations, crafts, a 17th century magician, puppet shows, period music and military band concerts.
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | November 24, 2006
For some St. John's College students who gathered yesterday at the college president's house for dinner, it was their first Thanksgiving away from home. And for others it was their first Thanksgiving - period. But for almost all of the 50 or so who gathered, it was a different kind of Thanksgiving. There was no football and no fussing about who should set the table or who sits where. Instead, the dinner hosted by Christopher Nelson at his West Annapolis home was a feast with meaning, enhanced by lofty readings about the nation's early history.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2002
Madut Agau and Adaw Makeir have lived in the United States for only five months, but the Sudanese refugees already have much to be grateful for on their first Thanksgiving. If they made a list, it would include simple pleasures they probably have in common with other Westminster residents: Makeir appreciates her electric baseboard heaters, which will keep them comfortable during a colder winter than they're used to. But ranked higher on that list would be good friends from Westminster Church of the Brethren, which adopted them; the education they provide to their four young children; and the safety they enjoy.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | November 28, 1991
Jeanie Jodoin wiggled in her seat, readjusting her paper bonnet and the large white collar attached to her dress. It was time for the Thanksgiving feast, and the 6-year-old needed optimum mobility."
NEWS
By Nia-Malika Henderson and Nia-Malika Henderson,sun reporter | November 24, 2006
For some St. John's College students who gathered yesterday at the college president's house for dinner, it was their first Thanksgiving away from home. And for others it was their first Thanksgiving - period. But for almost all of the 50 or so who gathered, it was a different kind of Thanksgiving. There was no football and no fussing about who should set the table or who sits where. Instead, the dinner hosted by Christopher Nelson at his West Annapolis home was a feast with meaning, enhanced by lofty readings about the nation's early history.
NEWS
By Lisa Anderson and Lisa Anderson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2006
NEW YORK -- One autumn day in 1621, newly arrived Pilgrims joined native Wampanoag Indians in Massachusetts' Plymouth Colony to share a harvest meal of thanksgiving, including roast turkey, pumpkin pie and an Indian-supplied delicacy, popcorn. From kindergartners acting in their first pageant to grandparents presiding over the family feast, most Americans know the story of Thanksgiving cold. And most of them would be wrong. It's time to talk turkey about Thanksgiving. While long immortalized in painting, poetry and song - and annually reinforced by chocolate turkeys, buckle-hatted Garfields on Hallmark cards and school re-enactments of the blessed banquet - the "first Thanksgiving" that gave rise to America's holiday tradition never occurred, at least not in the way most of us picture and understand it. There is no historical link between the harvest meal in 1621 and America's Thanksgiving narrative.
NEWS
By CHRIS LANDERS and CHRIS LANDERS,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 20, 2005
As area residents tuck into their traditional Maryland crab cakes and sauerkraut this Thanksgiving Day, they might want to take a moment away from all the palaver about pilgrims and Plymouth Rock to reflect on the Maryland statesman who really created the national holiday celebrated Thursday - John Hanson of Charles County. Or so say Hanson supporters. Actually, there is considerable disagreement among historians on who established the holiday. Hanson served as "President of the United States in Congress Assembled" under the Articles of Confederation in 1781 and '82. The Articles preceded the U.S. Constitution as an organizing document among the colonies.
NEWS
November 27, 2003
ON THIS FIRST Thanksgiving after Tropical Storm Isabel, thousands of Marylanders will find it impossible to celebrate the harvest of their lifetime labor. What remains of it is a scarred landscape of condemned homes and shuttered businesses, scattered communities and upended lives. Isabel's unwelcome tide washed away the material comforts of Harry Wujek's waterside retirement at Millers Island in southernmost Baltimore County. All of his wife's clothes, his first-floor furniture, all the tools he'd inherited from his father and planned to leave to his sons, 14 broken-out windows -- the insurance claim catalogs 40 items per page, more than 50 pages so far. A nomad since the September 18 storm, he has lived with his son, in a motel, now in an apartment.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2003
John and Kirstie Lorsch sat on a Penn Station bench yesterday with their two young daughters, savoring the relative calm - certain to disappear today - as they awaited a train taking them to see relatives in Boston. David and Elizabeth Green thought they, too, had planned a perfectly good Thanksgiving escape. That is, until an airline tried to tell them that their 3-year-old daughter had canceled the family's tickets to California in a phone call three weeks ago. The Lorsches and Greens - one couple content, the other beside themselves - are among thousands of Marylanders navigating a holiday obstacle course this week.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
It would seem odd to go turkeyless on Thanksgiving, but we'd make do. My mother-in-law's rolls, though, are another matter. If they went missing at the holiday table, a mass revolt would ensue. As she has accumulated grandchildren, Ann Waldron, a 78-year-old biographer and mystery writer, has also gained a young cult following for her yeasty rolls. Last year, as the turkey roasted and a pleasing chaos enveloped our home, the grandkids gathered around Ann, who instructed them in the art of baking Mildred Allen's Fool-Proof Rolls, named for the member of her childhood church in Birmingham, Ala., who, long ago, reluctantly divulged the recipe.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom Linthicum and By Tom Linthicum,Sun Staff | December 24, 2000
"The Times of Their Lives: Life, Love and Death in Plymouth Colony," by James Deetz and Patricia Scott Deetz, W.H. Freeman and Company. 366 pages. $24.95. And so, turkey-sated reader, what is your vision of the first Thanksgiving? Severe, teetotaling, black-clad Pilgrims assuming pious poses and offering thanks to God before feasting on turkey while a handful of noble savages observe? How about life in general in 17th century Plymouth Colony? More of the same, with Puritanical laws enforcing straight-laced behavior while men toiled selflessly and women stood meekly by?
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | November 17, 1996
Thanksgiving is a time of traditions, and there is no tradition more meaningful than the annual U.S. Department of Agriculture warning about fatal food-dwelling bacteria.This year, I'm pleased to report, the department has outdone itself: For the first time ever, the department has officially advised Americans not to stuff their turkeys.Many alert readers sent in an Associated Press item in which the acting director of the Agriculture Department's Meat and Poultry Hot Line -- whose name is (I am not making any of this up)
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