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First Six Months

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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1994
Major crime in Annapolis declined 8 percent in the first six months of the year compared with the same period last year.Figures released by the Annapolis Police Department yesterday showed that crime was down in every category in the first half of the year, while the percentage of crimes solved was up.Capt. Cassin Gittings attributed to the decline in crime to a number of factors, including severe weather, increased police vigilance and greater community involvement.The calls for service were up 11 percent in the first six months of 1994 compared with the same time in 1993, indicating that residents are becoming more involved in fighting crime, he said.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Baltimore saw 97 homicides in the first six months of 2014, one of the lowest totals at the halfway point in the past 30 years.  Killings are down more than 15 percent from the same time last year, when the city was dealing with a spate of more than 40 shootings in a two-week span , including 20 shot over a single weekend. The city ended last year with the first increase in non-fatal shootings in six years, and the highest murder count in four years . Not so this year.
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BUSINESS
October 30, 1990
Polk Audio Inc.The Baltimore-based manufacturer of high-quality audio speaker systems bounced back from a disappointing fiscal 1990 first quarter, when net earnings fell 50 percent compared to the year-earlier period, to a second quarter in which net earnings rose 61.4 percent, to $506,551, from the $313,814 recorded in the second quarter of fiscal 1989.Net sales in the second quarter were $7,588,916, a 17.5 percent rise over the $6,457,294 during the year-earlier period. Net earnings for the first six months were $683,551, 2.8 percent more than the $664,677 recorded during the first six months of fiscal 1989.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
A decade ago, Taymour Tamaddon was an MBA. student with a background in physics trying to convince Baltimore-based money manager T. Rowe Price to hire him as an intern. Not only did Price give him the internship and hire him later as a health care analyst, but six months ago the company chose Tamaddon to head up the Health Sciences Fund, one of the firm's top-performing funds with $7.4 billion in assets. "It's overwhelming, as you can imagine. Exciting, challenging," he said.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
Fueled by strong demand for business and consumer loans, First Maryland Bancorp's operating income rose 15 percent in the second quarter before a $6.3 million gain on the sale of securities, the company said yesterday.Baltimore-based First Maryland, which is owned by Allied Irish Banks PLC of Dublin, Ireland, made $41.2 million in the quarter that ended June 30, up from with $35.8 million for the comparable period a year earlier.Scott Rankin, a bank analyst at Davy Stockbrokers in Dublin, said First Maryland's performance was in line with expectations.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
Life Technologies Inc. yesterday posted a 3 percent gain in earnings for the second quarter.The Rockville-based supplier to the life science research and biotechnology industries reported earnings of $9.76 million for the three months that ended June 30, up from $9.45 million in the second quarter of 1998.Diluted earnings per share were 39 cents, unchanged from the corresponding period last year and below analysts' expectations of 42 cents a share.Revenue in the quarter was $100.3 million, up from $92.2 million in the second quarter of 1998.
NEWS
By CAROL KLEIMAN and CAROL KLEIMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 9, 2005
Why is enthusiasm about where you work and the people you work for so important? "The more enthusiasm a work force has, the higher the performance of a company," said David Sirota, founder of Sirota Survey Intelligence, a group of industrial psychologists based in Purchase, N.Y., who use survey methods to help companies improve managerial skills. "People come to work wanting to be enthusiastic, and they are - at least in the beginning," said Sirota, who has a doctorate in social psychology and has done behavioral science research for businesses for more than 40 years.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer Ross Hetrick contributed to this article | July 26, 1995
USF&G Corp.'s operating income jumped 15.4 percent in the second quarter to $45 million, the company said yesterday, as premiums increased and business lines showed continued improvement.For the first six months of the year, operating income grew to $84 million, up a whopping 47 percent compared with the period a year ago."It was a good first quarter and . . . a good first half," said Dan Hale, chief financial officer of the $14.2 billion-asset Baltimore-based insurance company.USF&G's stock closed at $15.375 a share, up 12.5 cents, yesterday.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Howard County Police DepartmentSun Staff Writer | August 17, 1995
Robberies, burglaries and thefts shot up during the first six months of this year, continuing a trend toward more frequent serious crimes in Howard County.After releasing a report on crime during the first half of this year, Howard police officials yesterday were at a loss to explain the increase."It's not one thing we can put a finger on," Sgt. Steven Keller, Howard County police spokesman.Seasonal changes, population growth and other factors could be affecting the crime rate, he said.The increase in serious crime in the county continues a more than two-year trend -- one that's part of a regional trend affecting TC other growing suburbs of Baltimore and Washington.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | July 16, 1991
With Westinghouse Electric Corp. reporting that earnings fell 50 percent during the second quarter, Chairman Paul Lego said that there are more tough times ahead for the company. "Our expectations of an early and strong economic recovery have not materialized," Mr. Lego said in releasing Westinghouse's financial results Friday."That, coupled with the fact that many of our businesses customarily lag the economy, will adversely impact our second half" of the year, he said.The 50 percent earnings decline for the second quarter was blamed in part on the flat performance of Westinghouse's big Electronic Systems Group, which is based in Linthicum.
NEWS
By CAROL KLEIMAN and CAROL KLEIMAN,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 9, 2005
Why is enthusiasm about where you work and the people you work for so important? "The more enthusiasm a work force has, the higher the performance of a company," said David Sirota, founder of Sirota Survey Intelligence, a group of industrial psychologists based in Purchase, N.Y., who use survey methods to help companies improve managerial skills. "People come to work wanting to be enthusiastic, and they are - at least in the beginning," said Sirota, who has a doctorate in social psychology and has done behavioral science research for businesses for more than 40 years.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2004
Certain types of violent crime in Howard County increased slightly in the first half of the year, but the homicide rate and the number of property crimes were lower than during the comparable period last year, according to figures released yesterday by the county Police Department. The figures showed that there were 105 robberies from January to June - 13 more than the same time a year ago. The number of aggravated assaults rose to 144 - 24 more than during the corresponding period last year.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2003
Allegheny Energy Inc., the troubled Hagerstown-based utility owner, faces a transitional year in 2004 in which it will need to cut its $5.75 billion debt by refinancing and selling assets, the company said yesterday as it released weakened earnings for the first half of 2003. Paul J. Evanson, Allegheny's chairman and chief executive, said the company is on track to meet goals set six months ago when he joined a company teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. "We may need to consider selling selective assets and taking other actions to reduce debt levels," Evanson said.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
Life Technologies Inc. yesterday posted a 3 percent gain in earnings for the second quarter.The Rockville-based supplier to the life science research and biotechnology industries reported earnings of $9.76 million for the three months that ended June 30, up from $9.45 million in the second quarter of 1998.Diluted earnings per share were 39 cents, unchanged from the corresponding period last year and below analysts' expectations of 42 cents a share.Revenue in the quarter was $100.3 million, up from $92.2 million in the second quarter of 1998.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 1, 1999
LOS ANGELES -- Blowing past all previous fund-raising records, Texas Gov. George W. Bush announced yesterday that he collected $36.25 million in contributions in the first four months of his presidential campaign.That staggering total is more money than any previous contender has raised over the entire two-year period of a presidential primary campaign. It is nearly nine times as much as Bush's closest Republican rival, Sen. John McCain, was able to raise in the first six months of the year.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1998
Even as Howard County and state officials prepare for county participation in the National Night Out Against Crime this evening, police yesterday released crime statistics for the first half of 1998 that show a dramatic decrease in nearly every offense.Sgt. Morris Carroll, a police spokesman, attributed the decline to better enforcement."We're focusing on targeting those people we think are career criminals," Carroll said.Robberies decreased 14.6 percent, from 89 during the first six months of 1997 to 76 this year.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2003
Allegheny Energy Inc., the troubled Hagerstown-based utility owner, faces a transitional year in 2004 in which it will need to cut its $5.75 billion debt by refinancing and selling assets, the company said yesterday as it released weakened earnings for the first half of 2003. Paul J. Evanson, Allegheny's chairman and chief executive, said the company is on track to meet goals set six months ago when he joined a company teetering on the brink of bankruptcy. "We may need to consider selling selective assets and taking other actions to reduce debt levels," Evanson said.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | July 18, 1996
A jump in trust revenues and fees charged to consumers on their deposit accounts helped push First Maryland Bancorp's earnings up 11 percent in the second quarter to $32.5 million, the company said yesterday.First Maryland earned $62.6 million for the first half of the year, up 8.6 percent from the $57.7 million it earned in the first six months of 1995.But, unlike other large banks that have operations in Baltimore, First Maryland's assets and loans barely budged."Everyone else has been growing," said Alex Hart, a banking analyst with Ferris, Baker Watts Inc. "It is a bit troubling.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
Fueled by strong demand for business and consumer loans, First Maryland Bancorp's operating income rose 15 percent in the second quarter before a $6.3 million gain on the sale of securities, the company said yesterday.Baltimore-based First Maryland, which is owned by Allied Irish Banks PLC of Dublin, Ireland, made $41.2 million in the quarter that ended June 30, up from with $35.8 million for the comparable period a year earlier.Scott Rankin, a bank analyst at Davy Stockbrokers in Dublin, said First Maryland's performance was in line with expectations.
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