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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 10, 1999
"Pokemon" comes straight from the Short Attention Span school of the cinema. With its incomprehensible plot, flat visual style and indecipherably mixed messages (violence is good; no, wait, violence is bad!), this movie seems chiefly to be an excuse to sell even more trading cards, those elusive billets that have turned a generation of youngsters into thieves, mercenaries and compulsive gamblers.But when has cynical marketing ever kept throngs of kids from clamoring for anything? Rest assured, they will demand to see "Pokemon," which presents parents with a dilemma: forbid the little ones to see what amounts to a swollen version of what they can see every Saturday morning anyway?
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2011
For the Jack Abramoff biopic, "Casino Jack," how difficult was it for John David Whalen to get into the heart and head of K Street lobbyist Kevin Ring? The Baltimore-born actor explained Wednesday that it wasn't all that hard. In an ensemble filled with master manipulators and scam artists from Kevin Spacey's Abramoff on down, "Kevin Ring's the innocent, the ingenue, the guy who goes along — he is not headstrong, not greedy, not a mover or shaker. " Director George Hickenlooper included this junior member of Abramoff's team in his cast of tainted characters only after he and screenwriter Norman Snider interviewed Ring about the Abramoff fraud and corruption scandal.
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 9, 1999
If you're the parent of a Pokemon fan, the release of the soundtrack album from "Pokemon -- The First Movie" (Atlantic 83261, arriving in stores today) is a real bad news/good news situation.The bad news is that you're facing an ever-widening array of Poke-product. Not only have the cute little critters spread from Gameboys and trading cards to the TV, thanks to the "Pokemon" animated series, but now they'll be taking over movie theaters and home stereos. Who knows how many other appliances will fall under their sway?
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | September 20, 2009
The 372 students attending Baltimore School for the Arts have never once spontaneously poured out the doors to dance atop the rooftops of cars stalled in traffic. Nor are there jam sessions in the cafeteria, in which tabletops are upended and transformed into percussion instruments, while the cafeteria workers smile benignly. Ah, Hollywood. Ah, "Fame." Those scenes from the 1980 film about life at a performing arts school in New York became a cultural touchstone for Gen Xers. They're often the first thing prospective parents bring up upon meeting the local high school's principal, Leslie Shepard, and they make her simultaneously wince and smile.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 16, 2008
Landmark Theatre Address --645 S. President St. Phone --410-624-2622 Concession stand hours --11:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. daily AMC Columbia 14 Address --10300 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia Phone --410-423-0520 Concession stand hours --Opens 30 minutes before first movie (usually noon on weekdays, 9 a.m. on weekends) and closes 15 minutes after last show The 8-inch-tall bag, $4.50, held about 5 cups. It was already filled and waiting for me, and it was a little dry. The self-service fountain allowed me to add all the butter flavoring I wanted.
FEATURES
By TAMARA IKENBERG | March 24, 2000
Thought last year's grunge hit "The Blair Witch Project" ended with the deaths of its three profanity-spouting, map-losing, witch-hunting rebels? It didn't. "The Blair Witch Project 2" began filming in Maryland this month, according to Andrea Thomas, manager of the Maryland Film Commission. Barbara Garner, an assistant manager at Seneca Creek State Park in Gaithersburg, said Seneca is being used as a location. Much of the first movie was shot there as well, she says. Many people assumed the wooded scenes were shot in Burkittsville, the tiny Maryland town that became associated with the film, spawned a Blair Witch souvenir market and more recently got pillaged by rowdy Blair Witch fanatics.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | January 13, 1991
WALT DISNEY'S BAMBITHE STORY AND THE FILM.Ollie Johnstonand Frank Thomas.Stewart, Tabori & Chang.208 pages. $29.95.Matt Groening, creator of "The Simpsons," recalled in a recent issue of American Film that when he was 2 1/2 years old, his sister took him to his first movie -- Walt Disney's "Bambi" -- and that he has never forgotten it."I enjoyed 'Bambi' immensely . . . but then came the forest-fire scene and I became convinced the theater was going to burn down. I had to be carried out screaming."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 14, 2003
The Jungle Book 2 covers the bare necessities. Several times. "Bare Necessities," you might recall, was the centerpiece song of the original Jungle Book, the 1967 animated feature that was the last film overseen by Walt Disney himself (he died the same year). Thoroughly enjoyable - though the animation wasn't up to Disney standards - the movie succeeded largely on the vocal talents of Louis Prima (King Louie of the apes), Sebastian Cabot (Bagheera the panther), George Sanders (Shere Khan the tiger)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | December 15, 2002
A new question about The Fellowship of the Ring periodically took over discussion of The Two Towers last week during three days of press conferences in New York: Which is the definitive version of the first movie in the Lord of the Rings trilogy? The 178-minute theatrical cut? Or the roughly half-hour-longer presentation on the "special extended edition" of the DVD? Even director Peter Jackson couldn't decide. He initially suggested that the theatrical version did play better in theaters.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2000
BURKITTSVILLE - Witch-seeking fanatics swooped into town carrying video cameras, tromping through residents' yards, even stealing souvenir dirt from the cemetery to auction it off on the Internet. That was the craze created by the movie "The Blair Witch Project" when it opened last summer. Don't blame residents for not leaping in ecstasy tonight - when the sequel opens. "We wish it would just go away," said Debby Burgoyne, who at first invited tourists to use her bathroom last year, because there are no public facilities in town.
NEWS
By Kevin Eck and Kevin Eck,kevin.eck@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
World Wrestling Entertainment star John Cena stars in his second movie, the action-adventure 12 Rounds, which opens Friday. We caught up with the professional wrestler recently to discuss his acting career. Was acting in a movie easier for you the second time around, after having done The Marine? It was certainly easier, but I don't think it had everything to do with the experience from The Marine. We really just had a very, very good crew. Mark Gordon's production company - he produced Speed, Saving Private Ryan - really stepped in there with Fox to make sure this thing kind of knocked itself out of the park.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach and Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporters | May 2, 2008
Even more than his love of gadgets, more than his appreciation of the comic-book ethos that inspired Iron Man, director Jon Favreau's success in bringing the Marvel Comics superhero to the big screen came down to his success as a mediator. Consider the creative forces he had to bring together. There was Iron Man himself, Robert Downey Jr., an actor of unquestioned talent and commanding presence, but one weighed down by a personal life that hasn't always been his greatest asset. There were the folks at Marvel Comics, gatekeepers of the Iron Man mythology since his creation in 1963, who were bankrolling their first movie (after depending on others for such mega-franchises as Spider-Man, X-Men and Fantastic Four)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 16, 2008
Landmark Theatre Address --645 S. President St. Phone --410-624-2622 Concession stand hours --11:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. daily AMC Columbia 14 Address --10300 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia Phone --410-423-0520 Concession stand hours --Opens 30 minutes before first movie (usually noon on weekdays, 9 a.m. on weekends) and closes 15 minutes after last show The 8-inch-tall bag, $4.50, held about 5 cups. It was already filled and waiting for me, and it was a little dry. The self-service fountain allowed me to add all the butter flavoring I wanted.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 25, 2007
Andy Griffith, 81 a week from tomorrow, confides that "when my wife, Cindy, and I go someplace, and I don't want to be recognized, she says, `Don't talk!'" Hearing him boom across the phone lines from his hometown of Manteo, N.C., you know what she means. Griffith's weathered face has been part of America's pop-culture Mount Rushmore for half-a-century, whether as Mayberry's comic philosopher of a sheriff or the wily cornpone lawyer Matlock. But his rich and loamy voice can open up pockets of memory like a down-home audio version of Marcel Proust's madeleine.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | March 27, 2006
Chris Robinson had been offered the kind of film scripts you would expect an award-winning director of rap and hip-hop videos to receive -- action movies, violent movies, comedies. All predictable, none worthwhile. A native of Harford County, Robinson wanted his first feature film to be like the movies he grew up watching and loving -- films like Diner and Do the Right Thing. He didn't want to make a movie about thugs, and he didn't want to make a movie that was little more than explosions and car chases.
FEATURES
March 17, 2006
THE QUESTION What was your favorite underrated concert movie, one that quietly touched the soul or maybe came and went in a flash of pyrotechnics? WHAT YOU SAY Perhaps the most interesting film that remains essentially an honest study in music icon egoism is Michael Apted's Bring on the Night. The premise is to chronicle the formation of Sting's post-Police band, The Blue Turtles, all the while making the lead singer appear more new-father human and less short-fused totalitarian than Andy Summers and Stewart Copeland might have argued at the time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | May 21, 1993
Attention! Do not look down into your popcorn box for the last few kernels while watching "Hot Shots! Part Deux," even for a few seconds. You will miss at least a couple of gags.Then again, you have seen their like before.Yes, the sequel to "Hot Shots" from director/writer Jim Abrahams follows the 1991 sendup of "Top Gun." It also fits right in with the "Naked Gun" and "Airplane" series, upon which Mr. Abrahams worked with those wild and crazy brothers, David and Jerry Zucker.And like its predecessors, the new movie follows the carpet-bombing theory: Unload a belly-full of sight gags, puns, body function jokes, silly stunts, lampoons of other films and juvenile sexual innuendo, and you will score some belly laughs.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | April 9, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- John Hughes, who wrote and produced ''Home Alone,'' (Chris Columbus directed), is incredulous over the success of the $18.2 million production. It had sold $257.5 worth of tickets as of the middle of last week and is about to become the third-highest grossing movie ever."Who would have guessed it?" he asks, comparing it to his previous efforts, such as "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" and other teen-oriented pictures that have reached plateaus of $70 million -- but never beyond. His newest film, "Career Opportunities," which he also wrote and produced, is, in his view, "a disappointment" because "I didn't have my usual creative control."
ENTERTAINMENT
By A.O. Scott and A.O. Scott,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 2004
Mike Nichols' latest movie, Closer, adapted from a play by the British dramatist Patrick Marber, is about four people, arranged in crisscrossing couples, who spend most of two hours slicing one another to bits with witty and vengeful repartee. In this respect it is a lot like his first movie, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, which in 1966 was adapted from Edward Albee's celebrated play, which remains unequaled in its portrayal of heterosexuality as a form of ritualized verbal blood sport.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 1, 2003
I DON'T know about you, but I was disappointed for Demi Moore when I read that her new movie semi-tanked at the box office this weekend. Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle debuted at $38 million, off $2.1 million from the opening numbers put up by the first movie, which means it sold about a million fewer tickets. Guess Demi will have to put aside any desire she has for public acclaim for her high art. Still, that's not a bad haul for a film riding the promotional back of a 40-year-old mother of three.
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