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By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Perky sunflowers, fragrant lavender and vibrant greenery surround a creaky wooden porch full of oddities on an Annapolis side street. A well-used plow, a porcelain wash basin and a cast-iron stove hardly seem germane to a consignment shop filled with high fashion, assorted art and tony accessories, as well as the occasional piece of vintage furniture. Owner Stella Breen-Franklin typically greets shoppers to One Petticoat Lane with an effusive "Wahoo!" and a cup of steamy tea, mint- flavored but never, ever iced, even when temperatures reach triple digits.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
For years, the Orioles were Washington's baseball team of choice. Lawyers and lobbyists would stop at the club's outlet store on Farragut Square on their lunch break and pick up tickets for games at Memorial Stadium or Camden Yards. Washington got its own club, the Nationals, in 2005. But thousands of fans never stopped following the team that was, for many, their first love. In Washington, it seems socially acceptable to be a fan of both the Nationals and Orioles - Carter Phillips is just that.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
For years, the Orioles were Washington's baseball team of choice. Lawyers and lobbyists would stop at the club's outlet store on Farragut Square on their lunch break and pick up tickets for games at Memorial Stadium or Camden Yards. Washington got its own club, the Nationals, in 2005. But thousands of fans never stopped following the team that was, for many, their first love. In Washington, it seems socially acceptable to be a fan of both the Nationals and Orioles - Carter Phillips is just that.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2012
Perky sunflowers, fragrant lavender and vibrant greenery surround a creaky wooden porch full of oddities on an Annapolis side street. A well-used plow, a porcelain wash basin and a cast-iron stove hardly seem germane to a consignment shop filled with high fashion, assorted art and tony accessories, as well as the occasional piece of vintage furniture. Owner Stella Breen-Franklin typically greets shoppers to One Petticoat Lane with an effusive "Wahoo!" and a cup of steamy tea, mint- flavored but never, ever iced, even when temperatures reach triple digits.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | May 31, 1991
In the world of pro sports, Winston Cup stock car driver Derrike Cope sounds almost too good to be true."I don't drink, don't smoke and don't do drugs," he said last night, at P.J. Crickett's while sipping club soda. "I never even tried pot. You can't do that kind of stuff if you're going to do sports. I was probably too good as a kid, but I was always into sports."Baseball was his first love. He was being scouted by the Chicago Cubs and the Orioles, until a home plate collision ruined his knee during his junior year in college.
NEWS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 1995
MOST PEOPLE dream of earning a living doing something they love. Local artist Nancy Kamachaitis- Walker has decided to make her dream a reality. After working for several years in the health-care field, Ms. Kamachaitis-Walker is returning to her first love -- art."The stress of my job in health care was really getting to me and my family," she said. "Art was my love, but medical technology paid the bills."Ms. Kamachaitis-Walker received her degree in medical technology in 1984, but continued her education and interest in art. She graduated from Towson State University with honors in fine art and photography in 1988.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1997
LORAIN, Ohio -- On warm summer nights in the late 1960s, Brad Daugherty would run outside to watch his dad and uncle race their hot rods down the street in Black Mountain, N.C.The power of the engines and the squeal of the tires echoing through his hometown in the foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains left a lifelong impression on Daugherty."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | April 9, 1991
HBO airs a half-hour docudrama tonight that is so enlightened, socially responsible and ultimately moving that you want to stand up and cheer."First Love, Fatal Love," at 8 tonight on HBO, is about a young woman who becomes infected with the AIDS virus while at college.The show opens with a couple of minutes of dramatization from the life of Kim Frey. She's four years out of college, has a good job and her own apartment. As she says in voice-over, "I was really on my way."But one of the messages on her answering machine in that opening sequence is from her doctor.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
Richard Earle "Ricky" Botts, at 19, was a fun-loving ex-Marine Corps recruit who liked to dress well and liked to dance at Club 101 in Towson. But the Bel Air resident couldn't get over the loss of his first love, said his sister, Karen M. Botts.Apparently distraught over the loss of his longtime girlfriend, Mr. Botts plunged to his death about 1 a.m. yesterday from the 20th floor of the Sea Watch condominiums at 115th Street in Ocean City."It was a love that went sour," said Ms. Botts, 24, of Darlington.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 28, 1998
"Why Do Fools Fall in Love," the extraordinary story of 1950s teen idol Frankie Lymon, fairly bursts onto the screen in a kaleidoscope of color, movement, music and tour de force performances.A trip down a musical memory lane set against the backdrop of the brief life of a gifted and tragic young man, "Why Do Fools Fall in Love" moves at a lickety-split pace, combining social history, old-fashioned yarn-spinning and some cathartic female bonding into a compelling tale of love and self-deception.
EXPLORE
By Lane Page | January 30, 2012
The opening scene went something like this: Setting: Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab building 17 cafeteria -- Fall 2009 Rocket Scientist #1: I do community theater. Rocket Scientist #2: I almost minored in theater in college. Rocket Scientist #1: Really? We should start a drama club here. Rocket Scientist #2: I'm in. Rocket Scientist #1: OK, good. For Big Science types at APL, tilting too far to their logical, self-controlled left brains could be hazardous. But that's less of an issue since the curtain was raised on the APL Drama Club by mission designer Chris Dong and fellow space department member Dawn Moessner, a mission design analyst.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2011
Harry R. Hughes, governor of Maryland, 1979-1987 "Our interactions were not always friendly; that is putting it mildly. … I still call him the mayor. I think most people do. … He really loved Baltimore. I don't think he ever got over that. That was his first love. " Parris N. Glendening, governor of Maryland, 1995-2003 Glendening recalled having lunch with Schaefer in Baltimore in early 1994 when Glendening was planning a gubernatorial run: "Schaefer said, 'You know, I'm going to miss this.
FEATURES
By Courtney Pomeroy and Courtney Pomeroy,Sun reporter | June 21, 2008
Oprah Winfrey has flaws just like the rest of us, says her longtime makeup artist Reggie Wells. She's got a puffy upper eyelid and no bridge on her nose, not to mention poor foundation-blending abilities. For 20 years, Wells, a Baltimore native, has been making one of the country's wealthiest women look like, well, a million bucks. Today, he will come home to show women here how they, too, can accentuate their beauty. "...
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | February 14, 2008
All they remember is that they were on an elevator. But what do the details matter now? A year ago, Bill Miller saw her standing there and was dazzled by her beauty. He asked her name and she told him: Jeanne Hamilton. He dropped her a smooth line. "Sounds like a movie actress," he said, grinning like the Cheshire cat. She got off the elevator at Sunrise Senior Living-Brighton Gardens Assisted Living of Pikesville, flushed, intrigued. The next day, she saw him again, and on an impulse, blew him a kiss.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Foreign Reporter | July 1, 2007
MOSCOW -- They met at a gathering of exiles in 1898, two revolutionary-minded activists with a penchant for talking politics and literature. He was attracted by her ideas, her morality, her kind but serious eyes. Felix Dzerzhinsky fell deeply in love. The man who would later direct the first Soviet secret police and orchestrate the purges of the Red Terror is famously known as "Iron Felix," a name befitting his blind devotion to the Bolshevik cause and his utter ruthlessness in eliminating enemies, real or perceived.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | May 14, 2006
How do you say goodbye to a first love? It's something I've often thought about because loyalty is so intricately constructed with several layers of complexity. I don't care what Dr. Phil says, you can delve through politics, religion and relationships and you'll never match the loyalty of a sports fan. But more and more, throughout arenas, stadiums and ball fields, loyalty has evolved into a one-sided concept. That's why I was in the upper deck at Camden Yards on Friday night, Section 338, watching three baseball fans in Row BB and wondering how Chad Carroll was going to say goodbye to a first love.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2001
Golf was not Dennis W. Townsend's first love. But his Towson company is now the owner of an ultra-posh 36- hole course and club in an area of New Jersey known for equestrian sports. Townsend Capital LLC bought the Hamilton Farm Golf Course this week from cash-strapped Lucent Technologies Inc., which had spent more than $40 million to develop it as an exclusive playground for executives of 18 corporations. But faced with financial losses and thousands of layoffs, the telecommunications equipment maker, a spinoff of AT&T Corp.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 22, 2000
Matt Kedzierski is one of the many interesting folks in our neighborhood. At age 28, this Howard County native has had three distinct careers. His first love is his art. He draws meticulous pen-and-ink views of fantasy figures, portraits and images of all things pooches. Kedzierski hopes to have his artwork support him-- a goal since he was a teen-ager. While a student at Atholton High School, he took as many art classes as he could. There have been a few detours: two years at Howard County Community College, and then it was time to earn some money for the rest of his education.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | September 8, 2005
In his restlessness, in his aggravation, there still was poetry. I'm tired of working for Starbucks for no star bucks / My time is worth more than $6.50 an hour. ... It was 1997 and, like countless artists before him, Shihan Van Clief decided to "follow his rainbow" and become a full-time poet. That year, he said so long to his boss and fellow employees at a Los Angeles Starbucks where he served lattes all day. Before that, Shihan (he goes by just his first name) had taught martial arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | June 19, 2005
You Poor Monster By Michael Kun. MacAdam / Cage, 350 pages, $23. This captivating, annoying, fascinating, frustrating, messy, laugh-out-loud tragedy by Baltimorean Michael Kun is all over the map -- of Baltimore, of the 20th century, of the interior landscape of its narrator, attorney Hamilton Ashe, and his slimy, sublime, seductive client, Sam Shoogey, inveterate tale-spinner and improbable liar. Shoogey is as despicable as he is inviting. Ashe is pendantic -- and full of honest yearning.
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