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By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 21, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President-elect Bill Clinton's casual comment in a Wall Street Journal interview the other day that, while he won't be appointing his wife, Hillary, to an official position, he hopes she'll be sitting in on Cabinet meetings, suggests a quantum leap in the role of the nation's first lady.Other wives of presidents have taken on substantive issues during their White House residencies, but nearly always with special projects they have carved out for themselves in a particular area.
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NEWS
January 10, 1996
REMEMBER? It wasn't Watergate; it was the coverup. And Richard Nixon could fire H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman in a failed effort to save himself. Now history repeats. It really isn't Whitewater; it's the coverup. And Bill Clinton, you can be sure, cannot fire his wife Hillary.So what to do? Week after week, despite a White House effort in lawyerly stonewalling, the impression grows that the first lady has a selective memory, an active past in litigious matters affecting her husband, an imperious attitude toward possible conflicts of interest and a tendency to drag close associates into the controversies over Travelgate, Whitewater, Madison S&L, Castle Grande, Vince Foster's death and other matters that have congressional committees on the prowl.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 22, 2001
WASHINGTON - First ladies and their staffs don't have ordinary professional relationships. Nancy Reagan's press secretary used to perch on the edge of the bathtub in the White House residence, taking notes while Reagan applied her makeup. Barbara Bush's chief of staff used to attempt scheduling miracles, knowing all too well how much Bush hated spending a night apart from her husband. Hillary Rodham Clinton's chief of staff used to meet her boss so soon after Clinton awoke that Clinton's face sometimes still would be lined from the bedsheets.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 25, 2004
One of the many election-related headlines last week involved Teresa Heinz Kerry, wife of Democratic candidate John Kerry, who questioned whether Laura Bush had ever had "a real job." Heinz Kerry, who quickly apologized when reminded that the president's wife had been a public school teacher and librarian for 10 years, made the remark during an interview for a PBS program to be aired tonight: The First Lady: Public Expectations, Private Lives. Conducted by Margaret Warner, senior correspondent for The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, and Susan Page, of USA Today, parts of the interview were published last week by both USA Today and The NewsHour.
NEWS
January 24, 1996
UNPRECEDENTED IS A word that should be used carefully in dealing with an institution as venerable as the American presidency. Yet "unprecedented" is the precise word to describe the issuance of the first subpoena ever issued to a first lady. Let it be emphasized that Hillary Rodham Clinton is not a "target" in a criminal investigation and if she were she would not have been ordered to appear Friday before the Whitewater grand jury. But let it also be emphasized that her subpoena strongly suggests the grand jury is considering possible obstruction of justice -- a serious federal felony.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 31, 2002
POTOMAC - Rep. Constance A. Morella, who benefited handsomely from a June fund-raiser attended by President Bush, was aided in a similar fashion yesterday by first lady Laura Bush as she appeared at a campaign lunch in Montgomery County with the 8th District congresswoman and about 250 supporters. It cost $500 to get in and $1,000 for a private reception with the first lady, Morella's campaign said. The fund-raiser with the president netted about $400,000 for the Republican's re-election campaign against Democrat Christopher Van Hollen Jr. Yesterday's event, held at a Potomac home and off-limits to the press, was smaller.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 3, 1998
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- Around here, they're standing by their woman -- Hillary Rodham Clinton.Flying into Northern Ireland yesterday a day ahead of her husband, President Clinton, the first lady received a rousing welcome when she spoke to 600 delegates attending a Vital Voices: Women in Democracy conference.In the spotlight and in command, the first lady talked of women's rights, equal opportunities and the hope that the promise of peace can be fulfilled in Northern Ireland."This is one of the most beautiful places on God's earth," she said to cheers.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 31, 1999
SYRACUSE, N.Y. -- Along with the live killer-bear show, the best-in-fair guinea pig, the Caribbean high-dive team, the "Dough-Licious" fritters and the cooking-with-cheese demonstration at the New York State Fair yesterday, there stood another main attraction: Hillary Rodham Clinton.The all-but-declared Senate candidate spent a breezy day in upstate New York doing what any hopeful New York politician would do. She threw herself into a sea of nearly 100,000 folks at the fair, offering her best campaign-style pitch as she went.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - Secret Service agents stood guard under crystal chandeliers, tourists snapped pictures and senators stayed on their very best behavior as Laura Bush made her Capitol Hill debut yesterday - a performance that fit her image as a first lady who is poised and prepared, but only reluctantly political. Appearing in the ornate hearing room of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, Bush stressed the importance of language and pre-reading skills among infants and toddlers.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2001
Dozens of curious onlookers peeked from street corners and behind yellow police tape in hopes of snapping a picture or getting a handshake, but second-grader R.J. Hargett was unimpressed when he learned the first lady of the United States would be visiting his Brooklyn school yesterday. "He's 7 years old. People don't excite him," said his father, Robert. Then, she showed up. Not only did R.J. and 20 of his classmates at Baltimore's Maree Garnett Farring Elementary hear Laura Bush read a book, teach a vocabulary lesson and introduce a faraway land called Ethiopia.
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