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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 22, 2001
WASHINGTON - First ladies and their staffs don't have ordinary professional relationships. Nancy Reagan's press secretary used to perch on the edge of the bathtub in the White House residence, taking notes while Reagan applied her makeup. Barbara Bush's chief of staff used to attempt scheduling miracles, knowing all too well how much Bush hated spending a night apart from her husband. Hillary Rodham Clinton's chief of staff used to meet her boss so soon after Clinton awoke that Clinton's face sometimes still would be lined from the bedsheets.
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NEWS
January 10, 1996
REMEMBER? It wasn't Watergate; it was the coverup. And Richard Nixon could fire H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman in a failed effort to save himself. Now history repeats. It really isn't Whitewater; it's the coverup. And Bill Clinton, you can be sure, cannot fire his wife Hillary.So what to do? Week after week, despite a White House effort in lawyerly stonewalling, the impression grows that the first lady has a selective memory, an active past in litigious matters affecting her husband, an imperious attitude toward possible conflicts of interest and a tendency to drag close associates into the controversies over Travelgate, Whitewater, Madison S&L, Castle Grande, Vince Foster's death and other matters that have congressional committees on the prowl.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 25, 2004
One of the many election-related headlines last week involved Teresa Heinz Kerry, wife of Democratic candidate John Kerry, who questioned whether Laura Bush had ever had "a real job." Heinz Kerry, who quickly apologized when reminded that the president's wife had been a public school teacher and librarian for 10 years, made the remark during an interview for a PBS program to be aired tonight: The First Lady: Public Expectations, Private Lives. Conducted by Margaret Warner, senior correspondent for The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer, and Susan Page, of USA Today, parts of the interview were published last week by both USA Today and The NewsHour.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 27, 2004
At this furiously partisan point in history, first lady Laura Bush and Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton have found twin issues to unite them: the need to help women and children in Afghanistan and to promote the Afghan feature Osama, a harrowing depiction of their plight under the Taliban. (The movie opens today exclusively at the Rotunda.) Senator Clinton, Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, Under Secretary of State Paula Dobriansky, Afghan ambassador to the United States Said Tayeb Jawad and Secretary of Labor Elaine L. Chao presented the film two weeks ago in Washington.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 31, 2002
POTOMAC - Rep. Constance A. Morella, who benefited handsomely from a June fund-raiser attended by President Bush, was aided in a similar fashion yesterday by first lady Laura Bush as she appeared at a campaign lunch in Montgomery County with the 8th District congresswoman and about 250 supporters. It cost $500 to get in and $1,000 for a private reception with the first lady, Morella's campaign said. The fund-raiser with the president netted about $400,000 for the Republican's re-election campaign against Democrat Christopher Van Hollen Jr. Yesterday's event, held at a Potomac home and off-limits to the press, was smaller.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 3, 1998
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- Around here, they're standing by their woman -- Hillary Rodham Clinton.Flying into Northern Ireland yesterday a day ahead of her husband, President Clinton, the first lady received a rousing welcome when she spoke to 600 delegates attending a Vital Voices: Women in Democracy conference.In the spotlight and in command, the first lady talked of women's rights, equal opportunities and the hope that the promise of peace can be fulfilled in Northern Ireland."This is one of the most beautiful places on God's earth," she said to cheers.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - Secret Service agents stood guard under crystal chandeliers, tourists snapped pictures and senators stayed on their very best behavior as Laura Bush made her Capitol Hill debut yesterday - a performance that fit her image as a first lady who is poised and prepared, but only reluctantly political. Appearing in the ornate hearing room of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee, Bush stressed the importance of language and pre-reading skills among infants and toddlers.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2001
Dozens of curious onlookers peeked from street corners and behind yellow police tape in hopes of snapping a picture or getting a handshake, but second-grader R.J. Hargett was unimpressed when he learned the first lady of the United States would be visiting his Brooklyn school yesterday. "He's 7 years old. People don't excite him," said his father, Robert. Then, she showed up. Not only did R.J. and 20 of his classmates at Baltimore's Maree Garnett Farring Elementary hear Laura Bush read a book, teach a vocabulary lesson and introduce a faraway land called Ethiopia.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau | January 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- It's the sort of question Emily Post never had to face: How do you politely disagree with the president's top adviser on health care reform when she's also the president's wife?But legislators, lobbyists and aides realized this week that such a point of protocol was one of many new questions they'd have to grapple with as President Clinton appointed first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton to head a national health care reform task force.Perhaps nothing jolted official Washington more into the reality that this first lady will be like no other than word of Mrs. Clinton making the Rolodex rounds this week, chatting up the likes Rep. Dan Rostenkowski of Illinois.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1998
McLEAN, Va. -- First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton helped the Glendening-Townsend campaign raise $250,000 last night at an event here in the luxurious stone house of a top Democratic fund-raiser.The first lady has been campaigning for Democratic candidates all over the United States.But she said of the Maryland governor's race, "This race is tight and should not be."It should be a runaway, but, you know you're here because we have to get the message out," Clinton said.About 70 people attended the event at the home of Terry McAuliffe, finance chairman for the Clinton-Gore campaign in 1996.
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