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By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1998
Pre-first: watered-down first grade or souped-up kindergarten?A gift of time or a theft of opportunity?A gentle boost for students not quite ready for school or an elitist strategy by parents trying to ensure that their children are at the top of their class?Wedged between kindergarten and first grade, pre-first can be all of the above, depending on one's perspective.In the Baltimore area, pre-first was a private-school creation, adopted by some schools more than 20 years ago to address the needs of youngsters with birthdays late in the year or with developmental clocks running slightly behind their chronological age.More recently, the idea of delaying the start of school for some youngsters has gained currency among public school parents, some of whom postpone the start of kindergarten by a year or send their children to kindergarten for two years.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 17, 2014
Thirty-five years ago, when the number of homeless people in Baltimore was noticeably on the rise, several reasons were given: mental illness and deinstitutionalization, the city's relatively high unemployment rate, drug addiction, family dysfunction and evictions, the lack of affordable housing and the problem of ex-offenders being released from prison without a welcoming destination. At the same time, more and more people, including children, were showing up for lunch and dinner at a growing number of soup kitchens.
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NEWS
By S. Mitra Kalita and S. Mitra Kalita,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1996
The difference between kindergarten and first grade is clear to Ryan Wingate."I get to eat in the cafeteria," the incoming first-grader at High Point Elementary School in Pasadena said yesterday as he colored on a paper plate.Ryan, who turns 6 in September, was among about 25 children and their parents who attended a workshop on getting ready for first grade yesterday.Eating lunch, riding the bus and learning to read ranked high on the children's lists of what they looked forward to in the first grade.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Dorothea Arvin Rawlings, a former teacher at Barclay Elementary/Middle School, died of cancer March 9 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The West Baltimore resident was 73. Born Dorothea Arvin Simmons in Baltimore, she was raised on Calhoun Street at Edmondson Avenue. She attended Booker T. Washington Junior High School and was a 1959 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. After attending Baltimore City Community College, she earned a bachelor's degree at Coppin State University.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Dorothea Arvin Rawlings, a former teacher at Barclay Elementary/Middle School, died of cancer March 9 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The West Baltimore resident was 73. Born Dorothea Arvin Simmons in Baltimore, she was raised on Calhoun Street at Edmondson Avenue. She attended Booker T. Washington Junior High School and was a 1959 graduate of Frederick Douglass High School. After attending Baltimore City Community College, she earned a bachelor's degree at Coppin State University.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,Staff Writer | June 14, 1993
It seems as if Jo Bembe has been crying for the past two weeks.First it was over the Sunday brunch her co-workers held for her. Then it was the 200 yellow "Congratulations" balloons in her room, and the banquet with Mayor Alfred A. Hopkins, and the Mass where her students sang songs about her.The last good cry she had was on Friday while standing outside St. Mary's Elementary School. Mrs. Bembe was busy directing traffic, receiving bouquets of flowers from parting students and ending a teaching career that lasted more than four decades, most of it at St. Mary's.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2001
He knows each one of their faces, knows which ones excel at math and which need to review their addition and subtraction. He knows their mothers, their fathers, their dogs. He knows when to push and when to let the fifth-grade frenzy take over for a while. Robert A. Bell knows these children better than some of their parents do. He has been their teacher at Edmondson Heights Elementary School in Baltimore County for five years, since the first grade. He has held on to the same class longer than any known public schoolteacher in the country.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | July 14, 2000
Mary Jo Lohmeier heard the talk. The owners of Richter Scale, the potential star of her stable, were considering retiring the horse to stud. She told them that the decision was theirs but that the determined Richter Scale was doing better than he had ever done. The owners listened. They chose sportsmanship over almighty breeding dollars and kept the horse training. Tomorrow, Richter Scale could reward them handsomely by winning the prestigious Frank J. De Francis Memorial Dash at Laurel Park.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1998
They must stand on their tiptoes to peer through the windows in the door to Room 8. They sometimes have to use both hands to turn its doorknob. But for 21 first-graders at Reisterstown's Cedarmere Elementary School, this is where it begins.Sure, for years at home, many of them have been listening to stories and noodling around with letters. In kindergarten last school year, they were supposed to master the alphabet and start putting letters together to form words.But this year -- first grade -- they will formally embark on the long, sometimes tricky path toward cracking the code: figuring out the countless ways in which letters become words and words gather into sentences.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing Writer | November 27, 1992
When Sol Rom was a little boy growing up in Mexico, he had a hard time staying in school.His school was not like an ordinary school. It was a big old church in Juarez, Mexico. It had large windows with small openings.He remembered the singing birds and the buzzing bees and how they beckoned to him to come out and play."I remember when I went to first grade, there were so many children," recalled the 64-year-old Baltimore County resident. "They would sit on the windowsills of the big windows in the old church.
NEWS
By Mary K. Tilghman | August 26, 2013
Susan Menefee and Erin Brice stood near the front door of Relay Elementary School, blinking back tears as they waited for the first day of school to begin. They weren't scared first-graders - or even the mothers of scared first-graders. Brice's twins, Sam and Mikaela, are in third grade this year. "Every year I cry," she said. Menefee's son, Sam, is in the second grade "It's just leaving your kids," she said. "I was excited yesterday, but today…. "It's scary and sad, but exciting," she said.
EXPLORE
December 29, 2012
Students at Parr's Ridge Elementary School, in Mount Airy, recently raised $1,351 to donate to the American Red Cross in support of victims of Superstorm Sandy victims. Students raised the money by participating in "Penny Wars," which had grade levels competing against each other to see which grade could collect the most money. First grade won and earned extra play time. Fifth-grade math classes and a fourth-grade class at Mount Airy Elementary School helped count the money.
EXPLORE
June 2, 2011
Yard-sailing. It sounds so … nautical. Everyone likes a good yard sale. I was just speaking with a neighbor about "one man's junk being another man's treasure. " The Reservoir High School football program, in association with various members of the local community, are sponsoring a community-wide yard sale at the high school June 25 from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. Your spot in the sale — a parking space — will set you back $15, $20 for two spaces or $30 for three. I think you see the pattern.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 3, 2009
Margaret Lorraine "Raine" Dugger, a retired city first-grade teacher who lived in Ashburton for two decades, died Nov. 26 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Gilchrist Hospice Care. She was 86. Margaret Lorraine Whyte was born in Baltimore and raised in the 200 block of Etting St. in West Baltimore. After graduating in 1940 from Douglass High School, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1948 from what was then Coppin Teachers College, located on Mount Street. In 1965, she earned a master's degree in education from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | December 9, 2007
David Keelan gives Ken Ulman a "B+" for his first year as Howard County executive, which might seem unremarkable, except that Keelan is a Republican blogger and a sometime critic of Democrats like Ulman. "He's being very deliberate and very careful," Keelan said, and "he's got a pretty good staff in place." Ulman began his second year in office Wednesday. Keelan's only complaint, he said, is that Ulman made an 11th-hour campaign promise last year to block the proposed 23-story condominium tower in Columbia but didn't actively support County Council legislation intended to stop it. With one year in office under his belt, Ulman, 33, is getting good marks from several observers both inside and outside government, though not without some criticism, too. "He certainly has been active," said Republican Del. Gail H. Bates, who worked in county government as a top aide to former GOP County Executive Charles I. Ecker during the 1990s.
NEWS
By SARA NEUFELD and SARA NEUFELD,SUN REPORTER | June 13, 2006
First- and second-graders in Baltimore public schools showed gains on a national test administered by the school system this spring, officials announced yesterday. In reading, first-graders scored on average in the 46th percentile of the Stanford 10 standardized test, meaning they outscored 46 percent of children in a national sample. That's up from the 41st percentile last year. Second-graders scored in the 43rd percentile, up from the 41st last year. Math scores were higher still. First-graders scored in the 53rd percentile, up from the 46th.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | July 24, 2001
PRESIDENT BUSH'S education reform plan includes federal support for efforts to enable all children to read by the end of the third grade. Early literacy has become a national crusade. Poor readers rarely catch up if they fall behind early. In fact, the newest research shows that reading by seven - in the first grade, with age-appropriate fluency and comprehension - is the first crucial milestone. The landmark 1998 report of the National Research Council, "Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children," explains that "students become readers" during first grade.
NEWS
October 29, 2000
The Carroll County Volunteer Firemen's Association held its fifth annual Carroll County Prevention & Life Safety Poster Contest awards program Oct. 21 for elementary-school children. At a reception for children and their parents, the committee, led by Debbie Gartrell-Kemp, presented awards to children who entered a poster. Winners honored were: Grand prize: first grade, Falesha Lewis from Charles Carroll Elementary; second grade, Christina Staines from Mount Airy Elementary; third grade, Shannon McHale from Sandymount Elementary; fourth grade, Nicholas Vidi from Winfield Elementary; fifth grade, Chris Schultz from Sandymount.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2004
Lockers need to be labeled, the calendar needs to be posted, and the nametags need to be laminated for the desks. But Natalie Herrick, who is starting her first year of teaching, is most excited about Monday, when she will meet her pupils. Yesterday was her first full day at Mount Airy Elementary School, where she is one of seven first-grade teachers and the only new one. Her day started with an orientation for all teachers in the cafeteria, but Herrick was concerned about getting her classroom prepared for the pupils, who will be back in less than a week.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2004
Lockers need to be labeled, the calendar needs to be posted, and the nametags need to be laminated for the desks. But Natalie Herrick, who is starting her first year of teaching, is most excited about Monday, when she will meet her pupils. Yesterday was her first full day at Mount Airy Elementary School, where she is one of seven first-grade teachers and the only new one. Her day started with an orientation for all teachers in the cafeteria, but Herrick was concerned about getting her classroom prepared for the pupils, who will be back in less than a week.
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